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Posted July 02, 2016 by

What can you do with a golf management degree?

What Can You Do with A Golf Management Degree?

To your friends and family, it seems like a dream job. “What do you mean, you are taking golf course management? You really mean you get paid to play golf, right? What a great job!” While it might seem to others that a student in a golf management degree program only plays golf all day, the truth is that the degree opens up a number of interesting careers paths in the golf industry.

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Director of Golf

The director of golf manages all of the golf operations at a course or country club. The job description varies depending on the company. However, every golf director must know the game inside out, including the rules and etiquette. They are also familiar with all elements of groundskeeping, including knowing grass varieties and maintenance best practices. Managing staff, dealing with members, organizing events and running a profitable retail operation are all responsibilities for the director of golf.

Golf Course Superintendent

If you ever wonder how important a golf course superintendent is, listen to how much blame they get from golfers every day. The superintendent is the person that takes care of the maintenance and operation of the course. They must maintain all of the turfgrass and plants; manage personnel; forecasts expenses and set budgets; help maintain good relationships with members; apply pesticides; and make sure the golf course is compliant with environmental regulations.

Golf Travel and Tourism

According to a recent study, 84 percent of golfers plan to travel in the next year, and a whopping 80 percent plan to play golf during their stay. Golf tourism is a vibrant segment of the golf industry. You may work as a brand ambassador at a resort or course, organize golf trips for companies and organizations, or manage golf travel firms that cater to the lucrative golf demographic. There are also positions in the travel departments of corporations, in the hospitality division of professional tours and in the travel offices of local and national governments around the world.

Equipment Manufacturer Manager

The golf industry is fueled by golfer’s unquenchable thirst for new clubs, balls and clothing that will help them gain just a few more yards. With a golf management degree, you are well-positioned to play a leadership role at an equipment manufacturer, retailer or channel partner. You’ll help market and sell equipment and services to courses, retail stores and resellers at every level.

We’ve only touched on a few of the interesting career paths you can take with a golf management degree. In addition to what we’ve discussed here, you can also use your degree to become a teaching professional, a club professional, a high school or collegiate coach, social media manager, equipment developer and tester, project leader, course designer and much more. You are only limited by your resourcefulness, persistence and creativity in creating the perfect job in the golf industry for you.

The Keiser University College of Golf & Sport Management is a regionally accredited, not for profit institution in West Palm Beach, Florida that trains students to work in the golf and sporting industries through five different degree programs.When it comes to golf, our staff understands what it takes to succeed. 

 

Posted June 04, 2016 by

Top 10 degrees that positively impact the world

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Most young people are college-bound and want to change the world. Here are the top 10  degrees that will help you have a positive impact on the world.

1. English

BA’s in English get a lot of flak for being one of the “useless” college degrees, but as many hiring managers should be able to tell you, English majors are equipped with critical thinking and communication skills that are useful in nearly every profession. Who knows? You might write a novel that brings to light and makes people think about a serious societal issue.

2. Business

This one will only have a positive impact on the world if students don’t allow themselves to become indoctrinated into the system. The business world needs innovators who will adapt to a changing world, keep ethics in mind, and care about people as much as their profit margins.

3. History

History majors are educated to be well-rounded thinkers, researchers, observers, writers, and, best of all, they understand the implications of history and how to apply the lessons it teaches us about the modern world.

4. Environmental Studies

It is no secret that environmental issues are one of the greatest challenges of our time. If you choose to major in environmental studies, you can embark on a path that will lay one or more of these issues to rest.

5. Psychology

Psychologists save lives, literally, by listening and helping others though the most trying times of their lives.

6. Film Studies

Like many other artistic pursuits, filmmakers have the ability to reach the general public and present them with new and challenging ideas.

7. Education

Many students cite a favorite teacher as the sole reason for pursuing a certain profession because that teacher inspired them.

8. Nursing

Nurses have more hands-on experience in saving people’s lives than most other professions.

9. Economics and Mathematics

The people who know how to handle and keep track of money truly run the world. Whether you help keep a good company in the black or help people with their investments, the impact of smartly-managed money can be enormous.

10. Civil Engineering

Whether you’re designing a bridge or a skyscraper, our society would not have gotten very far without good infrastructure. Civil engineering programs prepare students to build the societies of the future.

So when choosing what you want to major in and which degrees to pursue, remember that college is not necessarily about job training. It’s about allowing students to discover their talents and themselves.

Lizzie Weakley, freelance writer

Lizzie Weakley, freelance writer

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio, who went to college at The Ohio State University where she studied communications. She enjoys the outdoors and long walks in the park with her husky Snowball. Follow Lizzie on Twitter @LizzieWeakley and on Facebook at facebook.com/lizzie.weakley.

 

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted October 03, 2014 by

3 Tips for Choosing Your Major with Confidence

Colorful direction sign of majors

Colorful direction sign of majors. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Choosing a major can seem like a daunting task. You are young and you may not know too much about how you want your future to be. You may not know too much about yourself yet, actually. College is a time of growth and discovery. But, you’ll have to pick something, and here are some tips to make your choice with greater confidence. (more…)

Posted June 11, 2014 by

College Students, Choose Your Major Carefully to Improve Your Chances of Landing Entry Level Jobs

Depending on the majors they choose, college students may have an easier or more difficult time finding entry level jobs.  In the following post, take a look at the best and worst college majors for summer 2014.

So much goes into choosing a major. Our passions and aptitudes, input from parents and mentors, and career options once you’ve earned that degree such as: Which majors do employers look for most? For my career choice, will it be difficult to find a job? Within my career field, where are

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Posted July 31, 2013 by

College Students, Unsure about an Entry Level Job or Career Just Yet? Don’t Stress

While some college students may know exactly what entry level job and/or career they want, others may need more time to figure it out, and that’s okay.  Learn why in the following post.

Career confusion can happen at any age. It may start during childhood, when a teacher says you can be whatever you want to be when you grow up and then crushes your dreams by explaining that “mermaid” is not a viable career option. My personal career panic set in during a high school career assessment. As my classmates were

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Why It’s OK to Be Confused About Your Career

Posted October 08, 2012 by

Choosing a Major: Is the Job Market Your Only Concern?

College student thinking about choosing a majorWith the exception of the lucky few, most of us can probably narrow our options down to about five possible college majors. To help us choose between these five, we have a host of rumors and speculation about the job market, our own intellectual curiosity, and other people’s life stories. Our parents will happily tell us what to do, and they want the best for us, but as parents, they have a very limited view of what that means. (They want us never to struggle financially, for example, though after the fact, a struggle like that can represent one of the most important and vivid chapters of our lives.)

Many of us know which option we find most appealing when money is removed from the equation. But the more we lean toward that option, the more stridently we’re warned away from it on the grounds that it may not provide a steady income. This leaves us with the remaining four, which include one or two that seem crushingly boring despite their promise of lifelong stability. But is this an acceptable trade off? And what if that promise isn’t as well founded as it seems? (more…)

Posted July 30, 2012 by

The College Major—Making the Right Choice for the Right Reasons

While college is very much about living in a dorm room, eating various forms of microwavable food, and staying up for 24 hours straight in the library, it is also about discovering your passions, exploring your every academic interest, and learning who you want to be in your professional future. That being said, one of the most difficult and unnerving aspects of our college days is the process of choosing a major. As young 18 to 20 year olds, nothing is more daunting than thinking about the academic topic that seemingly decides the rest of your future. Today, students are faced with even more difficult decisions and challenges than ever before. As our national and global economy continue to falter, student loan debt mounting at an all-time high, and jobless numbers staying steadily high, even more pressure is being put on young undergrads to make the “right” choice. Don’t be blindsided by crashing economies and lucrative careers, consider these tips to choose the right major for the right reasons. (more…)

Posted November 23, 2010 by

Business, Engineering, and Computer Science 2011 Grads Most Sought After by Employers

Marilyn Mackes of the National Association of Colleges and EmployersEmployers are most interested in hiring new college graduates with bachelor’s degrees in the business, engineering, and computer science fields, according to results of a new survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Nearly 62 percent of the organizations taking part in NACE’s Job Outlook 2011 survey cited plans to hire accounting graduates. Other popular degrees at the bachelor’s degree level included:

  • Finance degree (57 percent of respondents);
  • Electrical engineering degree (53.5 percent );
  • Computer science degree (53 percent);
  • Mechanical engineering degree (53 percent); and
  • Business administration degree with a specialization in accounting, finance, and management (52 percent).

(more…)

Posted October 14, 2010 by

36% of College Grads Wish They Had Picked a Different Major

A tight job market may have some workers pondering their educational paths and heading back to the classroom. According to a new survey, 36 percent of workers with college degrees said they wish they had chosen a different major in college. More than one-in-four (26 percent) said the market for jobs in their chosen field worsened from the time they entered college and when they graduated. This survey was conducted among more than 2,000 workers with college degrees between August 17 and September 2, 2010.

While more than half (56 percent) of all workers with college degrees reported they found a job in their desired career path within one year of graduation, others’ pursuits still haven’t come to fruition. Nearly one-in-five (19 percent) of all workers with a college degree still have not found a job in their desired field.

More than one-in-four workers (27 percent) who graduated from college ten years ago or longer reported they still haven’t found a job related to their college major. Twenty-one percent said it took them three years or longer to find an opportunity in their desired career path while one-in-ten (12 percent) said it took five years or longer.

“The job market has been challenging for all workers, regardless of degree level, and has prompted many to think about learning skills for high demand and emerging jobs,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “Many employers, particular in areas such as healthcare, engineering, IT and communications have open positions and can’t find skilled candidates to fill them. College students and workers considering going back to school should take note of areas with growth opportunities and more abundant hiring.”

Building new skill sets is a priority for more than one-in-ten (13 percent) workers who said they have plans to go back to school this year to make themselves more marketable.

Haefner offers the following tips for workers who want to pursue more education:

  • Talk to HR – If you’re currently employed, many organizations offer some type of learning program. Whether it’s classes taught on-site at your company, courses and seminars across the country or reimbursement for graduate school programs, your HR department can help you decide what is the best fit for your goals.
  • Leverage the Web – Sometimes, you don’t even have to leave your home to hone your skills. Many sites offer a wide variety of learning opportunities, such as CBInstitute.com, or consider applying to an online university.
  • Take advantage of local resources – Many local libraries and community centers offer classes in everything from basic Internet skills to foreign languages. Ask around your community to see what opportunities exist.