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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 04, 2016 by

Stay-at-home mom to CEO: Transferring skills to the workplace

During one of our one-on-one meetings, Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, laughed as I described some of my potty training woes with my toddler.

“Just continue to lower your parenting expectations, and you’ll be fine.”

This sage advice has saved me from numerous mommy meltdowns. Faith Rothberg is not only a wonderful workplace mentor, but she’s also a mentor for young moms as well. Faith was recently featured in an article about returning to the workplace by OptIn as well.

Faith, a mother of three children, two of whom no longer reside at home, is a true parenting expert. She chose to stay home to care for her children after establishing her own career in the field of information technology after earning her MBA at the University of Michigan. Before earning her stay-at-home mom (SAHM) status, she worked for Ford Motor Company as a programmer, a manufacturing information technology consultant for KPMG, and for Wells Fargo as a project manager. Faith’s family photos adorn the walls of her house—even her home office—and she doesn’t hide the fact that her family comes first.

Yet as CEO of College Recruiter, an online recruitment media company named one of the world’s top career sites by Forbes, WEDDLE’s, and Business.com, how does Faith strike a balance between work and family? How did she transition back into the workplace after staying home with her children for 13 years? How did her SAHM experience provide her with transferable skills which now benefit her as CEO?

I recently interviewed my boss, Faith Rothberg, to ask her these very questions and more.


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Faith made the decision to stay home with her children after her second son was born. She admits she didn’t feel she was doing well as a mom or as a professional at this time in her life. The biggest surprise she had at this time was how hard it felt to be home every day and how many decisions she was faced with making all day long while caring for her children. She realized right away that she was building better multitasking skills, decision-making, and problem-solving skills as a parent. These are transferable skills that certainly aid her now in the workplace.

Many stay-at-home moms struggle when deciding whether to re-enter the workplace. “I don’t know if you ever know exactly that it’s the right time. When I made the decision to come back and start in our business . . . it was really good timing for the business, and it was almost good timing for me,” Faith candidly shares.

She admits she was worried she would not be able to be as available for her children. There was certainly an emotional component which was difficult during the transition back to work.

Faith suggests that parents who stay home with their children should remain active in their communities and at their children’s schools. Parents can volunteer in the classroom, on committees, and in non-profit organizations in order to round out their resumes to avoid major gaps with absolutely no experience.

Faith offers three tips for stay-at-home moms considering a return to the workplace.

  1. Evaluate what you want to do.

Often what you were doing before you had children isn’t what you want to do now (when returning to the workplace). You may have had a great paying job before having children, but now you may have different goals or objectives. Take some time and either work with a career coach or take career assessments online to reevaluate your goals. Get a career mentor and seek advice and guidance.

  1. Once you know what you want to do, update your resume.

You’ll have a gap on your resume during the time you stayed home with your children, and you may not have professional work experience to list on your resume during this gap. Use the volunteer experience and community involvement to fill in the gaps on your resume.

  1. Network.

Network with other children’s parents and with the spouses of those other stay-at-home parents. Network back with your former coworkers. Use LinkedIn and other social media sites. Send your resume to your contacts and friends and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

For more tips related to transferable skills, transitioning back into the workforce, and searching for jobs, visit our blog and follow us on social media at LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

 

 

Posted March 06, 2015 by

Getting a few pointers from the educators in the USA

Girl pointing to map of United States and smiling at viewer

Girl pointing to map of United States and smiling at viewer. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The USA is a country with a well-established education system that is proving its efficiency. Here are a few takeaways from the US system of education.

Affordability – access to education for everyone

The system of education in the United States of America is one which is considered a very successful and efficient one. Where there is always room for improvement and the USA’s education system has its faults, there are a lot of things that can be learnt from it. One of the most notable of the USA’s system of education is the access to education for all children. Education is free in the United States of America, as well as transportation to school. It is compulsory for all children to attend school. Since 1918, all states in the USA require children to complete elementary school. (more…)

Posted January 20, 2015 by

How Bilingualism and Multilingualism Help a Student in Education

Hello in Different Languages

Hello in different languages. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If a student speaks a different language he would perceive in a different world. Many theorist have written in the articles that being a bilingual or multilingual is better than a being a monolingual because to survive with a monolingual is not enough in the competitive world because over 5000 languages are spoken in the world which means that about 25 languages are spoken per state.

Therefore for a communication process between the individuals, the noise is not only a barrier but also the monolingual is also a big hurdle.  According to the David Crystal research in 1997 that two children from every three children will grow up with a bilingualism environment such as in Asia, Europe, etc. anywhere in the world. (more…)

Posted August 27, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Looking for Flexible Jobs? 4 Opportunities to Consider

For some recent college graduates, flexible jobs could be a better option than working in the corporate world.  The following post has four opportunities for grads to consider.

You‘ve probably heard plenty about lifestyle businesses lately. It’s the new world of entrepreneurship: Sitting on a beach somewhere taking client calls from all over the world. As much as you would love to find yourself in that position, you may still be hesitant to dive headfirst into entrepreneurship. After all, there is still a lot of self-directed

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Posted July 01, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Want to Impress Your Bosses on Your Entry Level Jobs? 8 Habits that Will Catch Their Eye

For young professionals who would like to make an impression on their entry level jobs, the following post shares eight habits that will get their attention.

Growing up, you were probably told to study hard, get good grades, go to college, and find a job with a respectable company, where you could spend 30 or 40 years working your way up the corporate ladder. And for the millions of you who have chosen that path, there is good news. You don’t always have to

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Posted April 30, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Worried about Losing Your Recent Graduate Jobs? Here is What You Can Do

Young professionals who hear about their recent graduate jobs being at risk should take a look at the following post to learn what they can do in this situation.

By Michael VanBruaene, Big4.com Guest Blogger When you see and sense that you may be terminated in the near future, there are actions you can take to prepare for the termination and position yourself to successfully move forward.  It’s important that you have a mind-set that positions you to be effective

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Posted March 20, 2014 by

Think You’re Overqualified for Some Entry Level Jobs? How to Still Compete for Employment

Just because you might believe you are overqualified to apply for some entry level jobs, that does not mean you can’t compete for them.  Learn more in the following post.

Overqualified: It’s a dreaded word no one wants stamped on their resume. But you can take several steps to help you land a job, even if your experience level rivals your potential boss’s. (Click here to tweet this thought.) Whether you’re looking for a job that’s a step down from a previous position

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Posted February 19, 2014 by

Writing a Cover Letter for an Entry Level Job? Tell Your Own Story

The next time you write a cover letter for an entry level job, consider telling a story to help make the case for why you’re the best candidate for the position.  Learn more in the following post.

Rather than start a cover letter in typical, ho-hum fashion, lead with a personal story that either happened at work or on your free time. It can be dramatic, interesting, unique (like Amanda Munster’s genius savings plan for a first home), exciting or downright unusual. If the anecdote relates directly to the job you’re

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Posted February 12, 2014 by

Are You a Mom and an Internship Finder? Consider Virtual Internships

If you’re a mom and an internship finder, a virtual internship might be perfect for you.  Learn more in the following post.

Featured: Not Featured I received an email from a student who was also a mom asking about the types of internships she could do. When you’re a mom, you have different priorities and a different schedule. Typically, you might also be looking for some flexibility and you might be interested in internship

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Posted February 05, 2014 by

Why You Should Celebrate Your Mom Going Back to School

Smiling mother with school belongings carrying her daughter

Smiling mother with school belongings carrying her daughter. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If your mother wants to go back to school, she is part of a nationwide trend. Many mothers are returning to the classroom after their children are grown. The National Center for Education Statistics found that women over the age of 40 make up nearly 11 percent of the undergraduate student body at colleges and universities throughout the United States. (more…)