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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 01, 2016 by

Keeping it old school on social media

Even in the digital age, there’s something warm and fuzzy about throwing it back to the good old days and keeping it old school when using social media. Maybe this seems ironic, but it makes a lot of sense; whether you’re searching for jobs, networking professionally, or connecting with friends, it helps to apply the same communication skills you use when interacting face to face to your online communication via social media. Recruiters and talent acquisition leaders—your future bosses—are looking for employees who exhibit great communication skills. If you can apply the following five tips to your use of social media, you’ll definitely improve your odds of landing internships and entry-level jobs.

This Tuesday Tip video, featuring Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, offers five suggestions for college students and recent grads for using social media old school style.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. If you can’t show Grandma, don’t show anybody.

When using social media platforms, particularly platforms which are image-heavy like Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, avoid posting photos (or posting comments or status updates) containing images or words you wouldn’t show or share with your grandma. If your grandma is a hipster, this rule doesn’t apply to you. Think about the stereotypical grandma who might be offended at the notion of seeing her grandson’s photos of a wild party. That’s the grandma we’re referencing here.

If that mild-mannered, conservative grandma wouldn’t want to see it or read about it, chances are your potential employers don’t want to see it or read about it either. So don’t share it on social media. Remember that just because you think you have your privacy settings locked down doesn’t mean they’re truly secure. Your friends can always tag you in photos. Facebook is publicly traded. And your friends and contacts can also take screen shots of what you post before you realize you need to delete the scandalous content. So play it safe and follow the grandma rule, particularly prior to and during your job search.

2. No phones allowed.

If you’re a traditional college student, your parents can probably tell you lots of stories about what it was like to attend parties and other college functions sans cell phones. Most wild college functions were never documented; the only records that exist of the crazy things that happened at sorority houses in the 80s and 90s live in the memories of the people who attended.

Take notes from the old folks on this one. The benefit to turning off your cell phones at the door of functions with your friends is that you won’t wind up posting any scandalous photos on social media, only to regret those posts later. It might seem fun to share the photos now, but when you begin searching for a job or internship, and employers Google you and find said photos, you’ll wish you’d followed the “no phones allowed” rule once in a while. You might want to suggest to your friends that they follow suit and turn off their phones, too. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find that you have more fun when you aren’t worried about taking selfies or being caught doing something silly.

3. Pay attention; you’re creating a brand.

When sharing, posting, liking, or communicating in any way with your contacts on social media, remember that you’re creating a brand for yourself. As The Police so aptly put it, “I’ll be watching you.” Your contacts—particularly recruiters and potential employers—are watching you. People often pay more attention to your online activity than what you might think. Be sure that you mindfully interact online and treat others with courtesy and kindness. Portray the image of yourself you want others to see. Brand yourself intentionally because if you don’t, you’re still creating a brand; it will just be a personal brand you’ve created haphazardly.

When you interact through social media, commenting thoughtfully on photos and status updates also lets your contacts know that you care about their content. This helps build genuine relationships. This is another way to apply old school communication principles to your online interactions.

4. Request a meeting with professional contacts.

After you’ve interacted with a professional contact online for a while, don’t be afraid to make the suggestion that you meet face to face, to ask for your contact’s phone number, or to request a Skype visit. Taking the next step toward more personal face-to-face interaction is always preferable because it gives you the opportunity to get to know your contact better. Professionals—whether employers or mentors—understand that you are networking in order to gain understanding about your career field and to seek job opportunities. Make your intentions clear when requesting a visit. If you are attempting to learn more about the career field, tell your contact that. If you want to learn about the company your contact works for, state that when you request to meet for coffee.

Most people are open to this type of request if they have time in their schedules. Even if they can’t meet face to face, they can often visit over the phone or online. Moving from social media, like Facebook messaging or direct messaging on Twitter, to a phone call, is a positive step toward building a lasting professional relationship.

5. “As offline, so online.”

This tip comes straight from marketing guru Samantha Hartley, owner of Enlightened Marketing. In the world of social media and electronic communication, people tend to interact more abruptly and to leave their manners at the door. This is a major faux pas if you want to maintain healthy professional relationships with your friends, professional contacts, and coworkers (and land jobs in the future).

Remember that when interacting on social media and through email, it’s just as important to treat people with courtesy, respect, and kindness as it is offline (face to face). As offline, so online.

For more Tuesday Tips and suggestions about using social media effectively in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

 

Posted April 10, 2014 by

25 Things Not to Do When Interviewing for an Entry Level Job

Now that you have earned an interview for an entry level job, don’t blow it by doing these 25 things in the following post.

Job seekers work hard to get a job interview. Once they get the interview, though, it is clear many don’t understand the need to impress, to fit into an existing culture or to compete well. A recent CareerBuilder study of over 2,200 hiring managers and human resources representatives showed some amazing behavior on the part of

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Posted May 03, 2013 by

How Recent College Grads Can Negotiate Starting Salaries

Professionals shaking handsIn a recent study, nearly half of employers reported they would pay recent college graduates $30,000 to $49,999 this year, and 25 percent reported they would pay $50,000 or more. When asked what they would be willing to negotiate when extending a job offer to a recent college graduate, 27 percent of employers said they would consider increasing starting salaries and a significant number said they would also be willing to negotiate other hard benefits such as tuition reimbursement and bonuses or soft benefits such as flexible schedules and telecommuting opportunities.

The percentages of employers who said they would negotiate benefits with recent college graduates being considered for entry-level jobs were: (more…)

Posted May 02, 2013 by

Only 5% of Fortune 500 Employers Allow Job Applications Via Mobile Devices

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

I admit it. I have a lot of pet peeves. I’m generally a positive person and appreciative of the beauty of our world and the beauty within others, but some things really tick me off. One of those is how incredibly horrible it is for job seekers to search for and especially apply to jobs using their cell phones and other mobile devices. Quite simply, the candidate experience is atrocious.

My friends, Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads, recently released a new white paper on how employers are using mobile recruitment market. The verdict: some progress but a whole lot of room for improvement. The white paper was based on a survey of human resource executives from large organizations and builds on a similar survey conducted two years earlier. This time, Mark and Gerry reported that a larger percentages of the companies surveyed have activity in mobile recruiting. For example: (more…)

Posted January 07, 2013 by

When, Why and How to Use Mobile Technology in Your Recruitment Efforts

Man watching webinarVirtually every member of Gen Y — today’s college students and recent graduates — and about 90 percent of Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers care enough about only one electronic device to carry it with them virtually everywhere they go: their cell phones.

Most young adults see their cell phones as important to carry with them as their wallet and keys and the significance of their cell phones has only grown as most of those young adults have graduated from feature to smartphones like iPhones, Androids, and Blackberrys. Indeed, some studies are now projecting that in 2013 the large majority of college students and recent graduates will own smartphones.  (more…)

Posted August 23, 2012 by

5 Tips for Securing Your Work Laptop and Mobile Devices

Young Male Thief Holding LaptopHow secure is your information at work? Of the 26 percent of workers who reported having office laptops, 61 percent said they have critical, sensitive information stored on them. According to CareerBuilder’s latest nationwide study, a significant number of workers may be putting their company or themselves at risk by failing to secure their laptop, sharing passwords or clicking on links from unknown sources. The study was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from May 14 to June 4, 2012 and included more than 3,800 workers nationwide.

What type of proprietary information is stored on laptops?

In addition to office-related data and documents, a notable percentage of workers said their laptops currently house a variety of personal files. When asked to identify the type of sensitive information that can be found on their office computers, workers with laptops pointed to: (more…)

Posted August 01, 2012 by

41% of Students Usually Have 3+ Devices Connected to Internet At Same Time

College students on laptops, tablets, and smartphonesThere’s little doubt that there’s been an explosion in usage of bandwidth on college campuses nationwide due to the rapid increase in number of smartphones, tablets, and digital media players used by students. It was only a couple of years ago when few students had smartphones or iPad-type tablets but now almost all have one or both.

The rapid growth in these Internet connected devices has led to significant bandwidth problems for information technology departments at the colleges and universities. Consider: (more…)

Posted December 05, 2011 by

How Employers Should Text Message Passive Candidates

Two of my favorite recruiting industry experts, Jim Stroud of The Recruiters Lounge and Michael Marlatt of mRecruitingcamp recently sat down for a conversation about whether employers should use cell phone text messaging (SMS) to reach passive job seekers, how they employers should text those candidates, and some tips and tricks to use to help ensure a successful campaign: (more…)

Posted August 28, 2010 by

Video: Taking Your Recruiting Message Mobile: Why, How, and When

I had the pleasure of delivering this 75 minute presentation a couple of months ago in San Diego, California at the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) 2010 annual conference. The description of the presentation was as follows:

Learn why your organization needs to have a mobile recruitment marketing strategy and how best to implement it so you can recruit the candidates you need and stay within your budget.

Virtually every member of Gen Y and about 90 percent of Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers care enough about only one electronic device to carry it with them virtually everywhere they go: their cell phones. If your organization’s web site and recruiting message are not fully accessible to your most sought after candidates on their mobiles then those candidates will end up becoming employees of your competitors. In this highly interactive and humorous presentation, learn why your organization needs to have a mobile recruitment marketing strategy and how best to implement it so you can recruit the candidates you need and stay within your budget.

Posted December 03, 2008 by

You’ll Always Know Where You Are With an Entry Level Job at TeleNav

I have a first generation iPhone, and despite the fact that it uses cell towers and Wi-Fi hotspots instead of GPS for location, I have still become entirely dependent on using my phone to find my way. It’s blatantly obvious that the cell phone is the convergence point for all kinds of technology – cameras, video cameras, computers, GPS devices, voice recorders, address books, and video games now exist in one device. The next step is tying location awareness into all of these functions, and that’s what Sunnyvale, CA based TeleNav is all about. They were the “first to launch a GPS navigation and mobile workforce management service on a cell phone in North America,” and they’re also the “fastest growing company in Silicon Valley” according to Deloitte. They’re partnered with “every significant wireless carrier and device manufacturer,” and they’re primed to make the most of the GPS chips that are now found in most phones. Continue reading about TeleNav…
Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job