• Job seekers, here’s how to defend yourself against a bad reference

    April 20, 2018 by

     

    If you are going to interview for a job, or if you already have, you are one step closer to when that employer will call your references. They will likely call all the references you provided, but don’t assume they will only look into those people. If you’re worried that the employer will contact someone who has a biased or negative perception of you, we have some advice. You can prepare for it and defend yourself appropriately.  Continue Reading

  • Consider launching your career in the public sector: Interview with the SEC’s Jamey McNamara

    April 17, 2018 by

     

    If you looking for an internship or full-time entry-level job, you will find many opportunities within government agencies. A public sector career can feel different from a career in the private sector. To sort out the differences and help you understand whether to pursue a government job, we asked Jamey McNamara, the Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer at U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). McNamara draws his advice here from years of experience developing employees and leaders, in recruitment and retention, performance management, compensation and benefits, and labor relations.  Continue Reading

  • What to do with my degree: Entry-level communications jobs and salaries

    April 06, 2018 by

     

    The biggest misconception about majoring in Communications is that it’s a fluff major, or it’s for students who don’t really want to study. In reality, though, the field of communications – which encompasses public relations, marketing, mass communication, journalism, and advertising – is a versatile major that opens the door to a wide variety of careers. It’s not a fluff choice; it can be a very smart choice. Here we dive into entry-level communications jobs and the salaries you can expect. Continue Reading

  • Job search advice: What to audit on your social media, and how to use recruiters’ tactics on themselves

    April 04, 2018 by

     

    The recent movie everyone’s watching about Facebook data and Cambridge Analytica should make job seekers hyper aware of the information they post online. Political analysts might build psychological profiles, but what do you think recruiters do to find the right candidates?

    Some entry-level job seekers are surprised when they discover that recruiters search online for information about them. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter says he finds this interesting. Some candidates get uncomfortable “when they discover that potential employers have looked at social media, talked with people not listed as references, and more.” But think of it this way, says Rothberg: you likely “have no qualms about looking at social media, talking with people who aren’t recruiters or hiring managers about that potential employer.” Continue Reading

  • Entry level business jobs: Your business major isn’t a shoo-in.

    September 27, 2017 by

     

    Business is the most popular major on college campuses today. Many students believe a business degree gives them the best shot at employment and a successful career, but according to the Washington Post, many employers disagree. Below we provide a list of entry level business jobs, but first, business majors should read what you are probably lacking and how to make yourself more employable. Continue Reading

  • Growing Your STEM Career

    October 20, 2016 by

    Love your science careerGuest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    The STEM workforce is crucial to America’s global competitiveness. STEM graduates have more career opportunities now than any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, a global chemical company, examines ways that recent college grads can establish a strong foundation to join the next generation of scientists and engineers. The first post in this series examined the different education paths to consider when preparing for a STEM and the second post examined the STEM career opportunities available. 

    STEM employment will increase rapidly: about 13 percent between 2012 and 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that STEM jobs will outgrow non-STEM jobs by almost two to one.

    If you are planning a career in STEM, you should know which areas are expected to have the most job openings. For instance, the fastest-growing STEM undergraduate degrees in 2013 were statistics, computer information technology, administration and management, and environmental health engineering, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

    Once you’ve landed your STEM job, how do you advance your career?

    Forward-thinking companies recognize the importance of creating a strong internal talent pipeline in order to fill the skills gap, and seek to attract and retain employees with growth potential. Many businesses now provide unique opportunities for employees to design their career in a variety of ways and explore multiple job functions within a variety of disciplines, rather than limit professional development to a linear career ladder.

    A great way to learn about other jobs is to immerse yourself in the company as a whole, and look for opportunities to participate in projects or interests that are outside of your job description. Some companies offer employees the chance to work with different groups and take on new responsibilities, exposing them to other roles from both an upward and lateral perspective. For example, BASF offers leadership development programs to help employees master new skills and discover additional talents. We organize these programs as rotational assignments, which provide entry-level hires with diverse working experiences. This is a good way to build their skills and professional network through cross-business training programs in areas such as marketing, engineering and supply chain management.

    Get creative

    Previous generations typically followed a linear career plan. However, today’s workforce seeks career experiences that are diverse, engaging and innovative. BASF offers unique non-linear career journeys, described as “career roadmaps” rather than “career paths.” For example, a manufacturing engineer working in plastics can use his or her product knowledge to switch over to a marketing position. Mid- or senior-level employees in the same field may have had very different career journeys that landed them in similar positions.

    It’s important to take ownership of your career goals, rather than adhering to the conventional belief that you need to perform at a certain level to reach a certain role by a particular age. Businesses today are empowering employees to embrace the freedom to creatively pursue their career goals. Through formal mentoring programs along with advanced training and education opportunities, companies are helping employees shape their aspirations and continue to develop their skills both on and off the job.

    It’s important to have regular conversations with your supervisor to set career goals for yourself and track your performance. If you discover a passion in an area outside your particular realm, see how you can work together to integrate new responsibilities into your role or transition into a new position.

    The STEM industry offers great flexibility to explore new interests and opportunities on and off the job. If you are an entry-level employee, be sure to keep an open mind and be willing to try new things. You may be surprised by where your career takes you.

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • Interviewing student veterans

    October 11, 2016 by

     

    Are you interviewing a student veteran for a job at your company? Congrats! Veterans bring a set of skills that can stand above the other students you are interviewing.

    If you are like many hiring managers, you have limited experience interviewing vets, and are not extremely familiar with what military experience looks like. It’s important to make sure you don’t ask anything inappropriate. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your interview while remaining sensitive and legal.

    What NOT to ask

    • Unless you are hiring for a Federal agency or work with Veteran Preference Points, don’t ask about their discharge status.
    • You cannot ask if they will be deployed in the future, even if their resume says they are in the Reserves.
    • Do not ask about potential disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act states that an employer may only ask disability-related questions after the applicant has been offered a job.
    • “Do you have PTSD?” (First, check your biases about vets and PTSD, and second, any question that relates to their mental health is legally off limits.)
    • “Did you get hurt in combat?” or “Do you expect your injury to heal normally?”
    • “Have you ever participated in a drug or alcohol rehabilitation program?”

    Instead, you can ask…

    • Behavior-based questions that help you truly understand their previous experience
    • Questions about their goals (be smart and avoid the cliche “Where do you see yourself in the future?”)
    • “How did you deal with pressure or stress?”
    • According to the Office of Disability Employment Policy, you may ask, “Have you ever been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol?” The answer to this question should direclty relate to their ability to perform the job.

    Veterans Day is November 11. Reach out to student veteran groups as part of your college recruitment this fall, and you may be impressed with what you find.

  • Preparing for a career in the STEM Industries

    October 06, 2016 by

    Guest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    1272644The workforce in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, or STEM, is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Today’s STEM graduates have more career opportunities available now than at any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, the world’s leading chemical company, will examine ways that college students and new graduates can establish a strong foundation that equips them to join the next generation of scientists and engineers.

    STEM disciplines have increasingly experienced talent shortages over the years. Recent data show that for every 1.9 available STEM jobs, there is only one qualified STEM professional available for hire. The resulting impact on the global economy is striking, given how many industries are part of the STEM supply chain. In fact, according to a recent report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), by 2018, there could be 2.4 million unfilled STEM jobs.

    If you are considering a career in any of the STEM disciplines, do you know which education path will best prepare you? There are many programs at four-year universities, two-year colleges, community colleges, junior colleges and vocational-technical colleges. With so many choices, it might be overwhelming to determine what’s right for you, but the good news is that you can establish a strong foundation for success through many different ways.

    Build a strong foundation

    While we always appreciate an advanced degree, at BASF we also seek candidates who have non-traditional backgrounds that offer a transferable, yet distinct, set of skills and abilities, such as active or former military personnel. We believe hiring diverse employees results in an engaged, high-performing workforce that drives long-term success. If you are pursuing a technical career, junior colleges and certificate programs can provide you with the trade skills many companies require.

    Expand your network

    There are many collaborative educational partnerships that exist between businesses and schools today. See if your school offers education tracks or career fairs to set you up with connections following graduation. Most STEM related companies interview and hire students before they graduate, working closely with colleges to get a jump on the competition.

    Some companies, including BASF, recruit high-potential candidates through internship programs. Internships are a great way to build first-hand experience, gain practical insights into a particular company and larger industry, and help you apply the skills you learned in school. While possessing strong science and math skills might seem obvious, young professionals in the STEM fields also need well-developed interpersonal skills, as well as presentation, public speaking, organizational skills and great attention to detail.

    After college, what’s next? For advice on the myriad career opportunities in STEM available to new graduates today, check back next Thursday to read “Exploring STEM Career Opportunities for Young Professionals.”

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • Student veterans: Do you think you know them?

    October 04, 2016 by

     

    Most organizations say they are interested in recruiting student veterans, and many large companies have whole teams dedicated to veteran recruitment. Yet we often see a disconnect between these teams and the college recruitment teams.  Some college relations teams don’t know what to do with student veterans so they refer them to the military recruitment team. The military recruitment team often doesn’t know what to do with students and so they refer them over to the college relations team. Continue Reading

  • Networking isn’t all about you

    August 19, 2016 by
    Business photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    How do you handle networking opportunities? Is it a one-way or a two-way street? The mistake you can easily make is that networking is all about you. Because you’re so focused on landing an internship or an entry-level job, no one else seems to matter. Having that perspective is a mistake.

    Networking is about communicating with professionals or other job seekers and building relationships with them. If you’re not just talking but taking the time to listen to someone else, you can learn valuable information to benefit your career. Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, explains why networking isn’t all about you and offers good networking tips.

    “We live in a culture obsessed with personal branding, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The problem occurs when the only thing professionals focus on is themselves. Don’t attend networking events to tell your story alone; focus on listening, as well. After all, networking should be a dialogue, not a monologue.

    It all comes down to authenticity. Are you joining professional groups and meeting people to only serve your career and to be the loudest, most talkative person in the room? If so, you will get nowhere fast.

    Show a genuine interest in meeting new people, sharing ideas, asking questions, and developing strong relationships. Nobody wants to associate with selfish, egotistical blowhards who try controlling every conversation.

    Being authentic also requires gratitude. Many young professionals forget to thank whoever takes time to talk to them. Express how much you appreciate each person’s time and energy. This leaves them with a positive impression of you and solves another common networking mistake, which is failing to follow-up.

    Most people assume their contacts will seek them out on their own. Don’t leave it to chance. Instead, be proactive, and connect online and schedule follow ups with a simple email or a request for a lunch meeting. Take charge, be humble, and maintain a level of professionalism.”

    Find more networking advice on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

    Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

    Michael Moradian is the Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, an honor society that recognizes academic achievement and provides valuable resources and tools to its members. Connect with Michael and HonorSociety.org on Twitter at @HonorSocietyorg.