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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 04, 2015 by

Numbers that matter most in your job search

The numbers that matter most in your job search, part three of a webinar series by Amanda Augustine, provides college students, graduates, and entry-level job seekers with powerful statistics, facts, and figures to help them develop an effective job-search strategy.

This three-part webinar series features Amanda Augustine (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jobsearchamanda), Career Management Expert who helps recent college graduates and accomplished professionals reach their full career potential. The webinar is moderated by Andrea McEwen-Henderson (https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreamcewen), former National Account Manager for College Recruiter.

Key takeaways:

  • Make sure what employers read about you online is consistent with whom they meet in person and read about on your resume. Take steps to secure your personal online accounts and flesh out your professional profiles.
  • Research a company thoroughly so you have a good sense of company culture before setting foot in the interview room.
  • If you find a job online you’re interested in, apply sooner rather than later. In the world of job seeking, early applicants are more likely to land jobs.
  • Don’t apply to a job without first checking to see if you know someone who works or used to work at that company. An employee referral can make all the difference in your job search.
  • Your resume only gets six seconds to make the right impression with a potential employer. Make sure your resume is crafted to capture attention.
  • Never rely on only one source for job leads—diversify.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Questions:

  1. How do I “secure” my personal brand?

If you are posting information for your personal brand and not for your professional brand, use separate profile photos. Use separate screen names as well; this way, your personal profile will not appear in searches conducted using your legal or professional name.

  1. Networking seems to be important for the job search. How can I expand my network?

Everyone has a network already, whether they realize it or not. Begin by cultivating the network you already have. Do an advanced search on LinkedIn, for example. When you’re ready to expand, take advantage of opportunities to connect with people with similar interests.

  1. What are some ways I can learn about a company’s company culture?

Job seeking and dating are very similar. Think about ways you might scope out a first date! Peruse company websites, “about us” sections, and social media sites. There’s a huge transparency trend today in many companies’ cultures; use this to your advantage as a job applicant.

  1. How do I make sure my resume passes the 6­-second test?

When crafting your resume, don’t just write a recipe. Think about tailoring your resume to the specific job you’re applying for, considering which specific skills are applicable to that position.

Amanda Augustine is a Career Management Expert who helps recent college graduates and accomplished professionals reach their full career potential. Her goal is to get professionals into the right jobs sooner through personalized job search and career guidance. Amanda offers consulting, speaking engagements, and training sessions to all professionals ready to advance their careers. Follow Amanda on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JobSearchAmanda, on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/jobsearchamanda, at http://www.jobsearchamanda.com/, or on The Ladders.com at http://www.TheLadders.com/AskAmanda.

Posted June 10, 2014 by

Writing a Resume to Find an Internship or a Job? 15 Tips You Can Apply

If you need some help writing your resume to find an internship or a job, check out these 15 tips in the following post.

For a large portion of my career, I’ve served as a hiring manager. In that role, I’ve reviewed an estimated five thousand resumes, perhaps more. I’ve hired sales people, tech experts, managers, marketing people and editors. While my experience may not be as extensive as some long-time HR professionals, odds are pretty good that I’ve

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Posted January 30, 2014 by

College Recruiter, How Would You Run Career Services?

Each college and university should examine whether their career services office is properly preparing its students for success in the real world.  If you’re a college recruiter, would you run career services like one recruiter in the following post?

Think of the years spent teaching a child good manners, how to ride a bike, brush their teeth, clean their room. With these in mind, think about this: Can personal career management be learned in a few short weeks at the end of the senior year? We’ve missed out on teaching young adults that

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Posted November 08, 2013 by

How Using Soft Skills to Tell a Story Can Enhance Your Resume to Find an Entry Level Job

While having the hard skills and qualifications can be the foundation of your resume when seeking an entry level job, possessing the soft skills to tell the story of you as a candidate could take the document to another level.  The following post shares how using soft skills to tell a story can enhance your resume to help you find a new job.

International Talent Management Strategist Dorothy Dalton recently wrote a compelling blog post: “The Hard Truth About Soft Skills,” which absolutely nails the value of soft skills in a career story resume. Dalton describes how resumes that come to her attention often do so based on the “high incidence of hard skills in the text,” but goes on to

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Posted December 11, 2012 by

Boost Your Career: Do What The Popular Kids Did In High School

CollegeRecruiter.comEven if you were not one of the most popular students in high school, you can learn lessons from those who were and apply them to your career.  Learn more in the following post.

Those cheerleaders, class presidents and smiling sports stars were so popular in high school, and they’re more successful in their careers, too.

They earn more than the rest of us even 35 years after high school is over, according to new research from the National Bureau of Economic Affairs.

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Boost Your Career: Do What The Popular Kids Did In High School

Posted August 10, 2012 by

How Recruiters and Hiring Managers can Help Candidates Make an Informed Career Decision: Part 2

Joe Murphy

Joe Murphy of Shaker Consulting Group

The founder of Checkster, Yves Lermusi and I had a chance to speak at TaleoWorld.  Yves has spent most of his career examining the talent space.   I asked him what we can do to help the candidate make a more informed decision.  He suggests we give the candidate feedback from the results of pre-employment assessments and background checks.  Click play to hear what he has to say, then continue reading below the video. (more…)

Posted May 02, 2012 by

Reinvent Your Career and Job Search – Part 2

A great wind is blowing and that gives you either imagination or a headache” – Catherine the Great

Career Alley In Part 1 of this article, we covered reinventing your career (Reinvent Your Career and Job Search – Part 1). Today’s post focuses on reinventing your job search. Similar reinventing your career, there countless reasons why you would (and should) reinvent your job search. Maybe you’ve been our of the job search market for a few years (or longer) and need to adjust to the ever changing online job search process. Or maybe your current job search is not yielding results. Possibly you don’t need to totally reinvent your search, maybe just tweak it. Whatever the reason, today’s post will provide some advice and links to the “how” part. Research – Where do you want to work? – First thing you should do is decide where you want to work (as in the company). You should make a list of the companies where you would love to work. This is, of course, the end result of lots of research. While you probably have an idea of your short list, you will (and should) need to do additional research to build out your list. There are tons of resources for your research. Following are a few links. (more…)

Posted May 02, 2012 by

Reinvent Your Career and Job Search – Part 1

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” – Confucius

Career AlleyI ran into an old friend (metaphorically speaking) that I used to work with very early in my career. We hadn’t been in contact for probably 12 years or so even though we spent 11 years (across two companies) working together way back when. When we worked together, he was not your average guy. He was a very successful business man, near the top of his field. A typical “type A” personality, but if he liked you he would go out of his way to help you. Anyway, long story short, I spotted him on LinkedIn and he then sent a message letting me know the new things he was doing (very different from what he was doing when we worked together). I pressed him a bit for more information on one of his new ventures (because it seemed so different from what I would expect) and he told me that every so often you need to reinvent yourself. And you know what? He’s right. Sometimes we are forced to reinvent ourselves (industries change, companies disappear, skill sets become irrelevant due to changes in technology, etc.) and sometimes change is just part of our natural progression. So, whether you’re reinventing yourself because of your own personal “evolution” or are changing due to a forced “revolution”, take some time to map out the best way to get to your destination. Reinvent Your Career:Before you reinvent anything, the first question you should ask is “why?”. There are millions of reasons why, but in the interest of time, I’ve tried to narrow it down to some of the most common reasons. The second question you should ask is “how?” and there are a few links below to cover that as well. (more…)

Posted April 12, 2012 by

The recession is over, but my career is dead!

I keep reading about how the recession is over and the job market is improving, but my situation couldn’t be worse.  I’ve been working over 60 hours a week for the last 2 years and am doing the work of 3 people.  Prior to 2008 I got calls from headhunters all the time, but my phone is still silent.  I feel like my career is dead but I still need to work for a long time.  What can I do? (more…)

Posted October 29, 2010 by

Leading Businesses Launch Training Initiative to Prepare U.S. College Students and Young Professionals for the Workforce

Today, Business Roundtable and HR Policy Association announced the release of JobSTART101: Smart Tips and Real-World Training, an online course for college students and recent graduates that introduces the professional skills necessary to succeed in the workplace. Even in a time of soaring unemployment, a survey revealed that 61 percent of U.S. employers report difficulty in finding qualified workers to fill vacancies at their companies. JobSTART101 addresses the gap between employers’ needs and workers’ skills by helping students understand the real-life challenges and expectations of the workplace.

The United States needs a well-equipped workforce that is prepared for the challenges of today’s job market. However, many college graduates do not have an opportunity to learn what employers expect and have not developed the professional skills that will help them succeed after they are hired.

“While our nation remains focused on job creation, it’s equally important to focus on ensuring that our workforce has the skills and training needed to succeed in today’s economy. Business leaders are concerned that many entry-level employees lack the communication and analytical skills that are necessary for sustained job success,” said William D. Green, Chairman and CEO of Accenture and Chairman of Business Roundtable’s Education, Innovation and Workforce Initiative. “JobSTART101 helps prepare new employees meet the challenges of the job market which is essential to building a competitive workforce.”

JobSTART101 is a first-of-its-kind course that’s free and available to college students and recent graduates nationwide. The course includes interactive components such as videos and course workbooks that cover topics ranging from how to communicate and solve problems to how to develop a professional persona that helps drive a career for long-term success. It is designed to be engaging and fast-paced, with the option for students to complete the entire course in approximately 90 minutes or tackle the six topical modules one at a time.

“A student or young professional who spends 90 minutes with this course will be a more productive employee and experience greater satisfaction in his/her first job without having to undergo extensive – and expensive – coursework or training,” says Alexandra Levit, an expert on business and workplace issues and the online instructor for JobSTART101.

Prior to today’s release, a group of college students provided feedback on the course. Six institutions participated in the pilot evaluation: California State University at East Bay, Coppin State University, DeVry University, Duke University, Northern Virginia Community College and University of Michigan. The majority of students reported that the course engaged their interest and included useful information and relevant examples that would help prepare them for situations they would face at work.

The need for JobSTART101 was identified by The Springboard Project – an independent commission of thought leaders convened by Business Roundtable – who recommended specific actions that would help Americans get the education and training they need to succeed in the evolving economy. The experts urged employers to better communicate workforce needs and expectations to students and increase American’s workplace readiness and competitiveness.