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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 28, 2018 by

Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Students and Grads

 

We have eleven resume tips to help students and grads write a professional resume that not only gets past the machines and attracts the eye of a recruiter, but stands out against other job seekers. Our Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Entry Level dive into these tips:

  1. Be specific about yourself. A big mistake you can make is to describe yourself generically
  2. The right format. Take advantage especially of the top half of your resume.
  3. Getting past the machines that scan your resume. Don’t assume a pdf is okay, and don’t try any tricks.
  4. Tips for women. You might be surprised at the research.
  5. Tailoring your resume. Another big mistake is to submit the same resume for many jobs.
  6. Tips for veterans. Learn how to market your military experience.
  7. Video resumes. When and how should you use them?
  8. Tips for engineers. We got some good tips from a recruiter at Intel.
  9. Proofread. Proofread, proofread.
  10. Following up after submitting the resume. You’re not done after you hit “apply”.
  11. Resumes for your second job out of college. Learn tips for what to change on your resume.

Read the Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Students and Grads

Get your dream job by following these resume tips

Posted November 28, 2017 by

What to do in an interview, and 7 things NOT to do

 

Entry-level job seekers, if you are invited to a job interview, you’ll definitely want to prepare. We have lots of advice on the College Recruiter blog about what to do in an interview, what to say, and how to dress, but today we will go further and discuss what not do as well. Vicky Oliver, author of “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions” and other bestselling career books, has advice to avoid blowing your chance at the job. Here are seven things you should avoid: (more…)

Posted October 24, 2017 by

Find a winter internship: A Guide of Do’s and Don’ts

 

If you need an internship this year, try learning from people who have failed or succeeded at finding one.

Your advisor says an internship will open doors and build your skills. But you’re busy with everything else, and you might not even know what to look for in an internship. What doors do you even want to open? And what skills do you even want to build?

We put together a guide of “Do’s and Don’ts” to help you find an internship that is right for you. It’s based on real stories that we heard from recruiters at Intel and The New England Center for Children. (We changed the names but the stories are about real applicants.) (more…)

Posted September 07, 2017 by

Online jobs for students and other tips to balance school and work

 

Balancing school and work is a game of time and money. First, you need to create a budget (this is easy) to figure out how many hours per week you have to work in order to pay your bills. Then, manage your priorities by thinking through how many hours you have each week and what you have to accomplish. If balancing everything  stresses you out, there are solutions. If you haven’t thought about online jobs for students, or about asking for a raise, we have tips for you below.

First, create a budget for yourself

The point is to know how many hours you have to be at work each week.

This is easy, really. (more…)

Posted August 29, 2017 by

Infographic: Tips from EY campus recruiter to find jobs for new graduates

 

If you are beginning your last year of college, don’t put off the job search. Looking for a job can easily start to feel like a full-time job itself. Luckily, there are things you can do that fold into your daily or weekly lives that will help you land a job by the time you graduate.

We spoke with Jill Wilson, who is part of EY’s U.S. Campus Recruiting team. She has some concrete tips for seniors to take this coming year in bite sizes, so you can find a job that you love without having to panic. This is part two of our conversation. Last week we discussed why it’s a bad idea to wait until April to start your job search, and what are the big items that seniors should check off during the year to land a job they love. (more…)

Posted July 13, 2016 by

Career assessments: Valuable at all stages of one’s career

Job candidate reading assignment in assessment center

Completing a career assessment can help job seekers at all stages of their career.

A career assessment is a great way for college students to learn more about the type of career they could pursue, based on their personality, interests, goals, and aspirations. But career assessments can also be beneficial for college students completing an internship, new college grads, and entry-level employees looking to make that next step in their career.

The reason is simple: “Learning about oneself is an ongoing, lifelong search,” says Stephanie P. Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team (MCPT), a Downers Grove, Illinois-based company that provides college students and families with a variety of financial and academic/career planning resources.

There are a variety of popular career assessments that have value at all stages of one’s college and professional career. The staff at My College Planning Team uses a combination of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® and the Holland Code Test. They also use and favor the YouScience assessment, an assessment that helps students reveal their paths to education and career success.

Taking a career assessment can be of value, but taking a career assessment and working with a college career counselor, career coach, or other career services professional to expand on those results can add real value.

“Self-assessment based largely on what the computer program identifies you as can be misleading, frustrating, and downright false,” says Kennedy. “Career counselors and educational consultants are trained to interpret these assessments and are skilled in presenting them in a customized manner.”

The team at MCPT excels in working with students who may want to learn more about how to get the most out of an assessment.

“While the assessment tools are efficient and highly respected in our field, the value of those assessments comes from our customized processing of the results with each person,” says Kennedy.

It’s never too late to take a career assessment. And it’s even more beneficial to complete a career assessment and get further analysis and guidance by partnering with a career professional who can help you plan your career based on the results of these assessments. Like Kennedy said, learning is lifelong. A thorough career assessment with a qualified counselor can be very helpful.

“For most people, the task of career exploration will not end with high school graduation, or with college graduation,” says Kennedy. “The tools of career assessment can aid you in your career exploration and decisions throughout your lifetime.”

For more tips on career assessments and other job search advice, stay connected by following College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Stephanie Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team

Stephanie Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team

Stephanie Kennedy is co-founder of My College Planning Team. She holds a M.S. in Counseling and College Student Development. A former admissions counselor, her team now helps students identify their passions and find the colleges that are the best fit academically, socially, and with career focus. Kennedy has worked at the University of Miami, Northeastern University, Texas A&M University, Stonehill College, and others. She has read hundreds of college applications and assisted thousands of students in their college adjustment and educational path. With her hands-on perspective, she guides students and families in a successful college search that goes far beyond the acceptance letter.

 

Posted March 05, 2016 by

What is career counseling

Photo of Veranda Hillard-Charleston

Veranda Hillard-Charleston, guest writer

Do people believe their current career trajectories feel like a hopeless game of grasping at straws? Maybe they’ve been thinking, “I don’t know what I want to do with my life” or “I don’t know what jobs I can get with my major/degree.” Having a long list of “I don’t knows” in the career department certainly doesn’t lead to increased life satisfaction. Luckily, there’s a solution: career counseling.

What is career counseling?

Career counseling is a goal-oriented process targeted at helping people gain better insight about themselves and what they want out of their careers, education, and lives.

According to Boise State University, the counseling element is one-step in a lifelong process of career development. Therefore, the object of career counseling is not to guide people in making better career decisions today. Instead, the focus of this process is to equip people with the self-knowledge and expertise needed to improve their careers and life decisions over their lifespan.

A career counselor is generally a master’s level professional with a background in career development theory, counseling methods, assessments, and employment information and resources. A professional will hold a confidential session with people to identify their unique values, interests, skills, career-related strengths and weaknesses, and personal goals in order to determine which resources they require and which course of action is most appropriate in helping them achieve these goals.

A career counselor can even help people separate their own career-related goals from those of others, such as parents, teachers, and friends who may be pressuring them to choose a specific career path.

Do I need career counseling?

Whether they’re freshmen in college or five years post-graduate, college students and recent graduates can benefit from the services of a career counselor. Since career development is a lifelong process – and people’s interests and skills are steadily changing – the earlier they gain insight about themselves and learn how to make career-related decisions, the better. If job seekers’ current dialogue is filled with “I don’t knows,” career counseling is a smart choice for them.

Possible career counseling for bank credit presentation of important issues courtesy of Shutterstock.com

frechtoch/Shutterstock.com

Maximizing from the counseling experience

So college students and recent graduates made the choice to get career counseling and scheduled an appointment. Their part is done, right? Wrong. A common misconception about career counseling is people show up, and an expert tells them exactly what career choices are best for them. In truth, career counseling is not a one-sided, quick solution to academic or career dilemmas. Consider the following:

• Job seekers are not simply there to receive. The counseling experience requires participation. An honest examination of job seekers is vital for the career counselor to guide them in the right direction. Together, they might uncover their career interests, but they must take action to continue down the right path.

• People must narrow down their goals. Coming in with a broad desire to “Figure out what they want in life” just won’t cut it. A clear-cut objective is necessary so each session has structure and both parties can tell when their work together is complete.

• Job seekers have to continue the career development process beyond counseling. A good career counselor can help them define their interests and values, identify goals, and provide resources and strategies for reaching these goals. Still, the important work is done by job seekers. They have to actually use these resources to pinpoint internships or job opportunities appealing to them and constantly consider how different opportunities match their interests, values, and skills.

Career counseling offers people a safe and confidential place to explore their career passions and identify areas in which they are experiencing difficulty. It is a collaborative relationship – the client and the counselor work together to discover the client’s true career goals and work to overcome any obstacles. However, the client must be devoted to career development and willing to do the work to truly benefit from the experience.

If you want more career advice, go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Veranda Hillard-Charleston is Chief Contributor for MastersinPsychologyGuide.com. She received her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern State University of Louisiana. Veranda has more than five years of experience as a trained mental health professional.

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted January 29, 2015 by

Is an Internship in Your Future? Tips to Find One

An internship is a great opportunity to gain skills and work experience in a specific career area.  It gives you an idea of what to expect in the workplace, not just the work itself but also the culture that exists.  For college students and recent graduates looking to get entry level jobs, landing a quality internship can be a stepping stone for their careers.  So, what does it take to obtain one of these opportunities?  Here are some tips to help you find your future internship. (more…)

Posted December 26, 2014 by

Getting a Legal Internship

Law student outdoors

Law student outdoors. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Graduating law school is a great accomplishment. It takes a remarkable amount of studying and dedication to become a criminal lawyer. Lawyers are very bright people. However, you will still have work to do after you receive your diploma. Now you need to set your sights on getting a legal internship. As you might imagine, there is a great deal of competition for these coveted positions. Therefore, you need to do everything you can to set yourself apart from the other applicants. Let’s take a look at some of the best ways you can go about landing a legal internship as soon as possible after you graduate: (more…)