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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 19, 2019 by

Employing People with Disabilities Shouldn’t Be a Challenge

(Note: Both interviewees, Paula Golladay and Gerry Crispin, will be panelists at the upcoming College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY on December 12th in New York City.)

While there has been an increased effort over recent years to create a more diverse and inclusive workforce, the focus has been primarily on gender and ethnic diversity. That leaves out a large and important group—people with disabilities. Although the Americans With Disabilities Act became law in 1990, many would agree that employers have failed to live up to the promise of this act.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 29 percent of Americans ages 16 to 64 with a disability were employed as of June 2018, compared with nearly 75 percent of those without a disability. The unemployment rate for people with disabilities who are actively seeking work is 9.2 percent—more than twice as high as for those without a disability (4.2 percent).

Fortunately, a recent study (the first of its kind) has dispelled many of the misperceptions about employing people with disabilities. In fact, the results, as reported by Accenture and the American Association of People with Disabilities, show that companies that hire people with disabilities outperform other organizations, increasing both profitability and shareholder returns. More specifically, revenues were 28% higher, net income was 200% higher and profit margins were 30% higher.

As it turns out, employing people with disabilities is good business.

“Persons with disabilities present business and industry with unique opportunities in labor-force diversity and corporate culture, and they’re a large consumer market eager to know which businesses authentically support their goals and dreams,” said Ted Kennedy, Jr., Disabilities Rights Attorney, American Association of People with Disabilities. “Leading companies are accelerating disability inclusion as the next frontier of social responsibility and mission-driven investing.”

So, how do job seekers with disabilities find opportunities, address their disability with potential employers and advocate for inclusion? We talked to two experts on the subject to answer some common questions. While you’ll find more agreement between our experts than not, there are some differences in opinions, which provides some thought-provoking insights to consider.

1. Should job seekers with disabilities bring these to the attention of a prospective employer and, if so, when and how?

Paula Golladay: This can be a touchy area, and one that’s very personal. Overall, you are not required to disclose the fact that you have a disability, unless hired under the authority of Schedule A. Schedule A refers to a special hiring authority that gives Federal agencies an optional, and potentially quicker way to hire individuals with disabilities. The other exception is if your disability requires a special accommodation. For instance, if you have a mobility issue, you need to disclose this to ensure that you can gain access to and navigate the building. In general, I tell people to wait to disclose their disability until they must do so, because, unfortunately, people still have biases.

Gerry Crispin: Absolutely and fearlessly. It’s better to learn whether acceptance is an issue as quickly as possible. However, timing is essential. If the hiring process will require an accommodation for testing, interviews, etc. then you must make the disclosure upfront. If an accommodation to the job itself will be necessary, then I’d suggest discussing the disability at the end of the interview as a precursor to employment—assuming you’ll be offered the job. If your disability/different ability is not relevant to the job, than it should not be an issue. If you demonstrate that you have trust issues before there is evidence to be concerned, then you’re leading with a negative attitude. Let the employer’s representative, the hiring manager or the recruiter be the one to accept your disability, or not; selecting you based on your ability to do the job alone, and then manage the evidence they present regarding acceptance accordingly.

2. Is it easier for those with disabilities to find career-related employment with some employers than others and, if so, how should job seekers identify which employers are more likely to hire someone with a disability?

Paula: Yes. For instance, the federal government has a mandate to hire a certain percentage of people with disabilities each fiscal year—12% with non-targeted disabilities and 2% with targeted (more severe) disabilities. Of course, some federal agencies do better than others at fulfilling these requirements. And, certain jobs have medical or physical requirements to consider. In addition to the federal government, I would look for a business that owns one or more contracts with the federal government of at least $10,000 annually. These companies must meet similar hiring mandates. Do your research. Disability.gov lists information on user-friendly sites designed for those with disabilities. Also, every public college or university is required to provide career services for people with disabilities.

Gerry: There are many ways to find employers that are more likely to hire those with disabilities. Employers typically want to publicize their commitment to diversity and hiring candidates with disabilities. If you do some research and look at the career section on companies’ websites, you may find evidence such as photos of employees with disabilities, testimonials, videos of employees with disabilities doing their jobs, and employee affinity groups dedicated to mentoring and promoting opportunities and acceptance of people with disabilities. Companies may also display awards they’ve received from national disability organizations or feature case studies. In addition, you may note whether the company is involved with community activism and/or philanthropy that is consistent with the values of people with disabilities.

3. Some employers, particularly those which are small, have little experience managing employees with disabilities and so may be reluctant to extend an offer of employment to a disabled job seeker. What should a disabled job seeker do when they encounter such an employer?

Paula: Technically, that’s discrimination, but it’s usually very difficult to prove. Certain questions are illegal, in which case you are within your rights to say, “You can’t ask that.” For example, an employer can describe the job and ask if you are able to perform the functions, but cannot ask “Are you disabled?” or “Have you ever filed a worker’s compensation claim?” The best thing to do is to be your own advocate and demonstrate that your disability doesn’t affect your ability to do the job. It may not be fair, but it is a reality that disabled persons must often go the extra three miles to prove themselves. Come to interviews prepared to address potential issues. You must sell yourself and your ability to do the job. In truth, your attitude can be your biggest barrier or your greatest asset. Be knowledgeable and confident in your behavior.

Gerry: Ask them “Are you aware if any of your employees have friends or relatives with disabilities—here or, perhaps with a different employer? What have you learned from them about how people with disabilities want or need to be treated?” Their answers will tell you whether it’s useful to move forward.

4. Is there a difference between diversity and inclusion and, if so, what?

Paula: Oh, yes there is! As mentioned in the introduction, employers are making an effort to increase diversity, but when it comes to making people feel included, they often fall short. For example, if there’s a meeting or a company function that an employee with a disability is unable to attend due to accessibility or telecommunications issues, then the company is not being inclusive. It could be as simple as making restrooms accessible, or more complex, such as offering accommodations for those who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, or those with cognitive issues to take part in presentations, meetings, etc. To advocate for inclusion and acceptance, you must own and accept your disability. If you can’t accept your disability, then how can you expect others to do so? Overall, it’s important to be positive and address issues professionally.

Gerry: I’m told there is, mainly by folks who believe that diversity is too aligned with more traditional issues around race and compliance. To me, inclusion tends to point to how we are all diverse…and the same. If there is a difference, then diversity tends to focus on what we can see—observable behavior, gender, skin color, etc., while inclusion offers a path to how we might all behave to ensure we understand, respect and learn from our differences.

Right now, the labor market in the U.S. is very tight, and yet, many people with disabilities remain unemployed. The Accenture analysis reveals a very inspiring statistic: Hiring only 1% of the 10.7 million people with disabilities has the potential to boost the GDP by an estimated $25 billion! Perhaps, once companies begin to realize the economic benefits, as well as the fact that diversity of all types provides fresh insights (especially into developing and marketing products and services that meet the needs of diverse consumers), they will embrace the idea of creating both diverse and inclusive workplaces.

_________________________________________________________________________

Paula B. Golladay

Paula Golladay’ s previous employment was within the profession of a Sign Language Interpreter for over 25 years. Currently, Paula serves as the Schedule A Program Manager for the Internal Revenue Service. She has helped the IRS develop leveraged partnerships nationwide to include, but not limited to, colleges and universities, non-profit organizations vocational rehabilitation centers that foster employment for Individuals with Disabilities (IWD). Paula has developed presentations that encompass all aspects of disability employment. In addition, she has presented on topics such as disability culture and diversity and inclusion. Paula has been recognized by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), Department of Labor (DOL) and other federal and private sector organizations as a subject matter expert regarding Schedule A hiring, promotion and retention. She has participated in local and national workshops both within the interpreting field and employment arena. Her expertise regarding how to prepare a federal resume is well recognized by established partnerships.

She has presented previously at Deaf/Hard of Hearing In Government, now Deaf in Government, Amputee Coalition of America, Freddie Mac, Internal Revenue Service national and local conferences. She has been an invited panel member for various college and university disability awareness events. She has presented at Veteran’s Day events, as well as several National Disability Employment Awareness events. Paula is one of the contributors of the development and evaluation of the anticipated OPM Special Placement Program Coordinator training curriculum.

Paula has received several awards in her career as the Schedule A Program Manager. In 2018, she was honored by receiving The Careers and the disABLED Employee of the Year award.

Gerry Crispin

Gerry Crispin describes himself as a life-long student of how people are hired.

He founded CareerXroads in 1996 as a peer community of Recruiting leaders that today, in its third decade, includes 130 major employers who are devoted to learning from and helping one another improve their recruiting practices for every stakeholder…especially the candidate. 

In 2010, Gerry co-founded a non-profit, Talentboard, to better define and research the Candidate Experience, a subject he has been passionate about for more than 40 years. Today the ‘CandEs’ has firmly established itself around the world and establishes benchmarks for employers each year in North America, Europe, Asia and soon South America as a ‘bench’ that shares their Candidate Experience data and competitive practices.

In 2017, Gerry helped launch ATAP, the Association of Talent Acquisition Professionals.

Additional Sources:

Getting to Equal: The Disability Inclusion Advantage 2018, a research report by Accenture and the American Association of People with Disabilities

“Hiring People with Disabilities is Good Business,” by Ted Kennedy, Jr., New York Times, 2018.

Join Paula and Gerry, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition, and other human resources leaders from corporate, non-profit, and government organizations at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY
Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young
Thursday, December 12, 2019
9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)
Ernst & Young World Headquarters
121 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030
GET YOUR TICKETS: www.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Posted August 26, 2019 by

How Important are Internships and Co-Ops?

Employers ranked identifying talent early through internships and co-ops as the most important recruiting factor.

It can be a bit confusing trying to determine what employers want from you as a student or recent grad. While teachers often focus on education and technical skills, surveys show that employers are looking for soft skills, such as being a good communicator and having the ability to work well in teams. The truth is that candidates need to be well-rounded, with a balance of necessary skill sets. However, among all the factors that employers consider, it appears that gaining experience and demonstrating your talents through internships and co-ops ranks at the top of the list.

Specifically, a recent survey of employer members of the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicated that those mostly large employers are most concerned with “identifying talent early through internships and co-ops,” with 94.9% indicating it as “very” or “extremely” important.

This makes sense when you consider the value of experience from both the students’ and the employers’ standpoints. As a student or recent grad, working in an industry, company or job function, allows you to determine whether you’re really interested in pursuing this career. A job description is one thing, but actually doing the work is another. From the employer’s view, your experience means you have successfully demonstrated your skills and may require less training to get up to speed. In other words, you start with an advantage.

While grades are important, the ability to apply your skills in a real-world situation is critical. Internships and co-ops give you a chance to put what you learned in the classroom to use. Again, not only do you learn what tasks you excel at and what areas you may need to improve upon, employers find it “less risky” to hire someone who has proven themselves.

Finally, internships and co-ops help you build a reputation and form relationships. While you may or may not receive a job offer from your internship company, your supervisor can be a great reference or write a recommendation that helps you land your dream job. Or, a co-worker could introduce you to someone who is hiring at another company. Networking can be powerful!

If you’re still trying to decide if you should apply for an internship or co-op, or just spend next summer chillin’ on the beach, here are a few stats to consider:

  • Your competition has experience: In 2018, over 84% of U.S. college grads had at least one internship or co-op on their resume.
  • Potential job offers: Approximately 50% of students who intern/co-op accept positions with their intern/co-op employer after graduation. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), participation in multiple internships in college helps students to secure employment or enter grade school within six months of graduation.
  • Higher starting salary: Studies by NACE show that graduates with internships and/or co-op experience reported a 9-12% higher salary, on average, than those without similar experience.

Not only do internships and co-ops help you grow personally and professionally, they give you a significant advantage during your job search.

Sources:

2018 Recruiting Benchmarks Survey Report, National Association of Colleges and Employers

“Just how important are internships and co-ops?” by Katy Arenschield, June 2017.

“Study Shows Impact of Internships on Career Outcomes,” by NACE Staff, October 11, 2017.

Jon Kestenbaum, Talent Tech Labs

Posted July 26, 2019 by

Find The Right Paid Interns With Targeted Job Postings

Sometimes the simplest solutions are the most effective. Case in point, when Talent Tech Labs* wanted to hire two paid interns, they tried posting the positions on a number of job boards with disappointing results. Frustrated by the lack of response, they asked College Recruiter for a recommendation.

Simple but Effective

Because Talent Tech Labs wanted to hire two students or recent graduates, versus dozens or hundreds of candidates, our team suggested using a $75, 30-day job posting ad. As part of our standard implementation, the posting included their logo and YouTube video at no additional cost. Studies show that the quantity and quality of candidate responses greatly increase when employers include at least one of these elements in their postings. 

According to Jonathon Kestenbaum, Managing Director of Talent Tech Labs, “Although we posted the same job on a bunch of job boards, half of all the applicants we received and both hires came from College Recruiter. We couldn’t have been more pleased with the results.”

Targeting Makes the Difference

We attribute this success to the fact that College Recruiter’s audience is exclusively college students and recent graduates. By targeting the right candidates, employers can maximize their budgets, while improving response.

Because we work with companies of all sizes, we know that the recruiting needs of every organization is unique. Not every employer has the resources to use multiple recruiting tools and plaster their job postings on every available job board. That’s why our targeted approach is more effective for small- to mid-sized companies. We’ve found that many smaller employers are looking for candidates that have recently graduated and trying to find their first or second job or students seeking internships, which is our sweet spot!

And because our online job posting process is fully automated, it’s quick and easy. In other words, you don’t need an entire human resources team to get the job filled.

Making Great Connections

Of course, we offer more than simple job postings. College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great part-time, seasonal, internship or entry-level job, which is why our interactive media solutions, including job postings, are designed specifically to make great connections between college students or recent grads and employers.

“We view every client, big or small, as a valuable partner,” noted Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer, College Recruiter. “Whether you want the value and ease of online postings, or customized, interactive solutions, we believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience and we’re passionate about customer service. That’s why we go the extra mile to offer free company logo placement and YouTube videos with our online job postings, while many other job boards charge extra.”

Start filling those open positions today with targeted online job postings that get results! Get started and post your job HERE. (link to pricing page on CR website).

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

About Talent Tech Labs

Talent Tech Labs is on a mission to elevate the state of the art in recruitment technology and bring innovation to the world of talent acquisition software. Based in New York City and Palo Alto, Talent Tech Labs brings the language of vendors like College Recruiter together with the language of employers and other buyers to help vendors, buyers, analysts and practitioners understand what these tools do, how they solve business problems and where each falls in the acquisition process. In essence, Talent Tech Labs provides a structure that allows everyone to look at TA technology through the same lens and learn how these tools practically solve actual recruitment problems.

Posted April 02, 2018 by

Cybersecurity recruitment: Attracting hard-to-find applicants and diverse college grads

 

We had an excellent panel discussion with experts who have years of experience in cybersecurity recruitment. They had insight into where to look for new talent, how and why to broaden your funnel, what has changed with Gen Z candidates, and how to attract the diverse talent you need. Our panelists were Pete Bugnatto, a strategic talent sourcing specialist at Lockheed Martin; Melissa Baur, Managing Partner at The Georgetown Firm; and Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter.

There is more demand than ever for professionals in cybersecurity. Pete Bugnatto of Lockheed Martin says there is simply more security needed. Now, just about everything needs to be secure and cybersecurity is more built in, rather than bolted on, to systems. (more…)

Posted October 25, 2017 by

Fix talent acquisition mistakes to avoid bad candidate experiences [white paper]

 

Talent acquisition professionals, how do you know if you’re providing a positive candidate experience?

Ask your candidates.

It sounds like a punchline to a joke, but in seriousness, the experience you give to candidates reveals a lot about who you are. Disengage, and you shrink the pool you have to fish in. Each candidate lost in the process costs money. Candidates are also customers and like all of us, they have grown to expect great experiences.  A great way to measure whether you’re providing a good candidate experience is really just to ask them. Talent Board, the nonprofit that oversees the Candidate Experience Awards (CandE’s) each year, uses a 4-point scale when they ask their survey respondents this question: “Based on your experience as a candidate, how likely are you to refer others to [your company]?” (more…)

Posted September 13, 2017 by

What if your interview invitation email wasn’t an email?

 

If you text with your candidates during the hiring process, you will likely see things pick up speed. The technology is available, and candidates are waiting for you to use it on them.

Millennial candidates appreciate employers who text with them

Sending texts to candidates has the added benefit of increasing your cool factor. At least for now (before all employers start doing this), this is one way to distinguish your employer brand. (more…)

improving the candidate experience should be the goal of every employer, and every talent acquisition specialist. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted June 01, 2017 by

Why employers should focus on improving the candidate experience

Candidate experience, according to Jibe, is defined as “how job seekers perceive and react to employers’ sourcing, recruiting, interviewing, hiring, and onboarding processes.”

Why candidate experience matters

Improving the candidate experience should be at the top of every Talent Acquisition Director’s recruitment and retention strategy. It’s that important. Want more proof? Check out these statistics from Lever, which provides software that streamlines the hiring process and simplifies the Applicant Tracking System:

  1. 83% of talent say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once liked, while 87% of talent say a positive interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once doubted.
  2. 60% of job seekers have quit an application in the middle due to its length or complexity.
  3. 72% of hiring managers say they provide clear job descriptions, while only 36% of candidates say the same.
  4. 80% of job seekers say they would be discouraged to consider other relevant job openings at a company that failed to notify them of their application status. Yet, they would be 3.5 times more likely to re-apply to a company if they were notified.
  5. Talent is 4 times more likely to consider your company for a future opportunity when you offer them constructive feedback.

Employers looking to reduce attrition, hire high volume in cost-effective ways, and develop low-cost tactics to recruit diverse talent, need to pay close attention to improving the candidate experience.

“Candidate experience is everything,” says Sanjoe Jose, CEO at Talview, a digital interviewing, talent engagement, and hiring analytics software company. “The most important aspect of improving the candidate experience is recognizing that you’re not just dealing with candidates, you’re dealing with people. They want respect. Respect their time and efforts. Don’t make them take a day’s leave and travel for a first round interview, use tools. They want clarity on timelines and the process. Respond to their queries in near real-time, by using technology like chatbots.”

Candidate experience touch points

These scenarios all influence the candidate experience:

  • The experience a candidate has reading a job description and instructions given on the job description.
  • The simplicity – or difficulty – of using an applicant tracking system to apply for that job.
  • The introductory email or auto respond email that is generated after the application is submitted.
  • Follow-up communication, such as being called for a phone interview, or in-person interview. Or, a follow-up email notifying the candidate they weren’t selected to advance in the process.
  • The interview – how the candidate is greeted and treated in the interview.
  • Post-interview follow-up – is the candidate kept informed of timeline/when a decision will be made?
  • Presentation of an offer.

The candidate experience helps build an employer brand,” says Jose. “Even if people don’t want to work for you, a good candidate experience can lead to them becoming ‘brand ambassadors’ passing on the good news about your company to others that might be interested.”

And people are certainly going to share their candidate experiences online via social channels.

“Social media means that people talk more now than ever before,” says Jose. “It means that word of mouth is now global, rather than local.”

Improving the candidate experience

There are three main components to a candidate experience, says Jose, and understanding the role each component plays can help employers and talent acquisition specialists present a strong candidate experience:

  1. People: Including recruiters, hiring managers, and even the receptionist who is the first person the candidate meets if he/she comes into your office.
  2. Systems: All the tools candidates use during the process impact the candidate experience, including: The applicant tracking system used to apply for the job, tools used for video interviews, assessments and/or onboarding tools, are all a part of the many systems employers use that relate to the candidate experience.
  3. Process: The efficiency of the process, turnaround times, automated messaging, followup are all part of the candidate process.

Improving all of those is essential to improving the candidate experience.

Jose recently heard from the CEO of a large technology company who said one frustrated candidate wrote to the CEO expressing disappointment in the lack of follow-up after an interview. This is a prime example of a poor candidate experience. If it happens to one person, it’s likely happening to others.

That has both long and short-term effects.

“In the short-term, candidates will drop from the funnel,” says Jose. “In the long-term, a poor candidate experience leads to a poor ability to attract good candidates.”

And then the cycle continues, recruiting costs go up, attrition rises, positions go unfilled, and the company suffers.

“Every single candidate touch point—the online application experience, each interaction with the scheduler, the preparedness of the interviewers, the turnaround time in communicating with candidates, the way an offer is delivered—reflects on the employer,” said Elaine Orler, CEO and founder of talent acquisition consultancy Talent Function, in an SHRM article. “If you’re missing the mark, the world soon knows about it…and highly skilled people juggling competing offers will certainly factor their experience as a candidate into their final decision, so it impacts offer acceptance rates.”

That’s why improving the candidate experience should be the goal of every employer, and every talent acquisition specialist.

Want more advice and tips on how to improve the candidate experience? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Applicant tracking systems can help employers with their campus recruiting needs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted March 30, 2017 by

How to use your applicant tracking system for college recruiting success

 

It’s no secret the advancement of technology has changed the recruiting game. The use of applicant tracking systems (ATS) – software applications that enable the electronic handling of a company’s recruitment needs – are responsible for the technological recruiting revolution. As outlined by ICIMS, a provider of cloud-based hiring solutions, ATS recruitment “allow organizations to collect and store candidate and job related data and track and monitor the process of candidates through all stages of the hiring process.”

ATS recruitment is designed to enhance the overall recruiting experience for both recruiters and candidates. But forward-thinking employers recruiting recent college grads focus on the job seeker’s needs – the candidate experience – first.

“It’s important to make it as easy as possible for candidates to apply,” said Tim Mayer, Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company, which uses BirdDogHR Talent Management Suite. “If your application is a time intensive process, people will drop out during the process or might not even try at all.”

There is some rationale for using the ATS to collect as much info as reasonably possible, including screening and ranking questions, but none of that matters if the candidate doesn’t hit “submit” adds Mayer.

“Interaction with the ATS could be the applicant’s first step in the candidate experience and can set the tone for a great, or poor candidate experience,” says Mayer.

What’s unique about applicant tracking systems is how they allow recruiters and hiring managers to customize their ATS for specific jobs, roles and even events. For example, a recruiter or hiring manager working a college recruiting fair or campus job fair could fully customize their ATS with functionality solely for that specific campus career fair, or hiring event.

SmartRecruiters is one example that allows recruitment marketing and collaborative hiring in the cloud. Bjorn Eriksson, Chief Marketing Officer of SmartRecruiters, offers some unique examples of how employers can customize an ATS for an event such as a college recruiting fair or campus job fair:

  • Prepare: Know which positions you are actively trying to fill. Be sure the representatives working the booth are familiar with the open positions and hard-to-fill niche career opportunities so they can speak to them when engaging with students. With some ATS’s, like SmartRecruiters, you can publish event specific job ads tailored for college job fairs.
  • Qualify: Prepare questions or a brief interview to pre-qualify applicants. Prepare questions to ask those who express an interest in your company to pre-qualify them. “It’s also a great opportunity to focus on providing meaningful information to students,” says Eriksson. “Don’t just recruit them, but ask their opinions, offer relevant advice and see if they are really a good match.” Make sure to capture students’ contact information so that you can continue the dialogue.
  • Connect: Respond to inquiries and follow up ASAP after the event. While the impression is still fresh, group your candidates into: Best matches, possible matches, and no matches. View each candidate as a potential customer or future client, and tailor your follow up message to each group.

Ultimately though, the success – or failure – an individual or employer has with the ATS isn’t solely technology-based, says Saïd Radhouani, Ph.D., co-founder of Nextal, a collaborative applicant tracking system.

“I believe that the ultimate success depends on how the ATS is used, and not on how it’s set up,” said Radhouani. “Yes the implementation and functionality has an impact, but even if the setup is good, it doesn’t mean that recruiters won’t make mistakes.”

When a recruiter starts using a new ATS, they often won’t understand all the features and functionality, says Radhouani. As time goes on, they sometimes fail to learn new functionalities, and don’t maximize the systems capabilities. So recruiters within the same organization who use the same system should meet monthly to collaborate and share experiences, functionalities, and tips on how to best optimize their applicant tracking system.

“Recruiters should also attend webinars put on by the ATS vendor,” said Radhouani. “If recruiters know other colleagues from different companies who are using the same ATS, reach out to them to see how they are using it to ensure they are getting the most out of their ATS.”

And if the ATS vendor has a community forum, be active in the forum, ask questions and provide feedback.

Recruiters should be sure to measure success – and failure – in their recruiting by using the analytics/metrics capabilities of their ATS.

“Most modern applicant tracking systems have analytics capabilities that provide very insightful metrics about the entire recruiting process,” says Radhouani. “If a recruiter doesn’t measure what they do, they’ll never know whether they’re improving their productivity or not.”

Over time, recruiters and hiring managers get frustrated if an ATS is not user-friendly, doesn’t have specific functionality and capabilities, and does not help enhance the recruiting process. Applicant Tracking Systems are not all equal, and as hiring managers move from company to company, and use different systems, they can find pluses and minuses of each system they use. The key however, is to take advantage of the functionality of the system that is in place, find what works, and align your recruiting needs with the capabilities of the system.

“If you don’t have what you love, love what you have,” said Radhouani. “Every ATS has its good and bad sides. Recruiters should focus on the good side and work with the ATS, not against it.”

Mayer agrees.

“Really embrace the entire suite of options your ATS provides,” says Mayer. “Automate where appropriate and make sure the ATS provides a candidate experience that aligns line with your employment brand.”

Want to learn more about latest recruiting trends? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted December 23, 2016 by

Fiat Chrysler has award winning candidate experience

Award winnerCongratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among the winners is Fiat Chrysler Automotive. This is what they have to say on their website what it’s like to work there.

 

INNOVATION

It’s a dynamic, challenging climate we work in. To stay ahead in the automotive industry, you need to embrace change, cherish competition and think bigger. BOLDER. And that’s what we expect from every member of the FCA team, in every role. It takes a nimble company to compete in the global marketplace and, today, our products are sold in more than 120 countries around the world. You’ll find FCA a fast-paced work environment—one that will keep you challenged and growing from day one.

LEADERSHIP

You’ll work with people who exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit, act with integrity and are accountable for delivering what they promise. We’ll make sure you have the chance to prove yourself right from the start, and ongoing opportunities to make an impact. We are a meritocracy. How far and how fast you grow in your career is yours to own. You’ll get the freedom to think for yourself, the encouragement to share your ideas and the rewards to make it worth your while.

PASSION

Here, we don’t look at the product we produce as simply a car or a truck or a minivan. These are truly labors of love. To us, every design, every piece of engineering, every new technology that makes up our offering represent opportunities to innovate…explore…invent. You can apply yourself in ways you never imagined at FCA. The energy is dynamic.

COOPERATION

We may be independent thinkers, but we’re a team at FCA, committed to treating everyone with dignity and fairness. We’ll expect you to bring—and voice—your point of view. You’ll work with people from different countries, different backgrounds and different disciplines who offer totally different perspectives. And we know that embracing our differences makes us stronger, more innovative and more in tune with the needs of our global client base.

RESPONSIBILITY

As a responsible corporate citizen, we invest in our communities…help build a safe, sustainable environment for future generations…and encourage and promote the workforce of the future through education programs. We’re also committed to our team members. We respect each other’s roles and support each other’s growth.

 

 

Posted November 25, 2016 by

LEGO Group has award winning candidate experience

Award winner

Congratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among those winners is LEGO Group. Lego has this to say on their LinkedIn page and their website:

At the LEGO Group®, our mission is to inspire and develop the builders of  tomorrow. True to our spirit  “Only the best is good enough”,  we are a great company to work for – fun , fulfilling and always challenging in a fast moving market and industry.  The great thing about the LEGO Group is everyone seems to have their own story to tell about their LEGO experience, which highlights our belief in a People Promise – Succeed together.”

 

LEGO Group’s “People Promise”:

At the heart of the LEGO Group is our People Promise – ‘Succeed together’. We strive to inspire and develop children to think creatively, reason systematically and release their potential to shape their own future – experiencing the endless human possibility. Our culture is based on openness, trust and our core values: Creativity, Imagination, Fun, Learning, Quality and Care – which are reflected in everything we do. The role of the LEGO People Promise is to enable execution of the business strategy and build the long-term health of the company, It defines why people should choose and commit the best of themselves to the organization, clarifies the “give” and the “get of the employee relationship and provides a common point of reference for employee management.