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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 25, 2017 by

HR metrics: Surprising truth about reducing cost-per-hire

 

Do you take all costs into account when you measure cost-per-hire? That is, staff time, travel costs, etc. If you do, Steven Rothberg is guessing that you’ll notice something about on campus recruiting versus online recruiting. Rothberg is the president and founder of College Recruiter and has both depth and a breadth of knowledge of employers’ HR metrics, and how they tend to use cost-per-hire, as well as how smart employers reduce it.

Think cost-per-hire is the best way to measure the performance of your recruiting team? Think again. Read Steven Rothberg’s insight below about the best key performance metric, and more. (more…)

Applicant tracking systems can help employers with their campus recruiting needs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted March 30, 2017 by

How to use your applicant tracking system for college recruiting success

 

It’s no secret the advancement of technology has changed the recruiting game. The use of applicant tracking systems (ATS) – software applications that enable the electronic handling of a company’s recruitment needs – are responsible for the technological recruiting revolution. As outlined by ICIMS, a provider of cloud-based hiring solutions, ATS recruitment “allow organizations to collect and store candidate and job related data and track and monitor the process of candidates through all stages of the hiring process.”

ATS recruitment is designed to enhance the overall recruiting experience for both recruiters and candidates. But forward-thinking employers recruiting recent college grads focus on the job seeker’s needs – the candidate experience – first.

“It’s important to make it as easy as possible for candidates to apply,” said Tim Mayer, Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company, which uses BirdDogHR Talent Management Suite. “If your application is a time intensive process, people will drop out during the process or might not even try at all.”

There is some rationale for using the ATS to collect as much info as reasonably possible, including screening and ranking questions, but none of that matters if the candidate doesn’t hit “submit” adds Mayer.

“Interaction with the ATS could be the applicant’s first step in the candidate experience and can set the tone for a great, or poor candidate experience,” says Mayer.

What’s unique about applicant tracking systems is how they allow recruiters and hiring managers to customize their ATS for specific jobs, roles and even events. For example, a recruiter or hiring manager working a college recruiting fair or campus job fair could fully customize their ATS with functionality solely for that specific campus career fair, or hiring event.

SmartRecruiters is one example that allows recruitment marketing and collaborative hiring in the cloud. Bjorn Eriksson, Chief Marketing Officer of SmartRecruiters, offers some unique examples of how employers can customize an ATS for an event such as a college recruiting fair or campus job fair:

  • Prepare: Know which positions you are actively trying to fill. Be sure the representatives working the booth are familiar with the open positions and hard-to-fill niche career opportunities so they can speak to them when engaging with students. With some ATS’s, like SmartRecruiters, you can publish event specific job ads tailored for college job fairs.
  • Qualify: Prepare questions or a brief interview to pre-qualify applicants. Prepare questions to ask those who express an interest in your company to pre-qualify them. “It’s also a great opportunity to focus on providing meaningful information to students,” says Eriksson. “Don’t just recruit them, but ask their opinions, offer relevant advice and see if they are really a good match.” Make sure to capture students’ contact information so that you can continue the dialogue.
  • Connect: Respond to inquiries and follow up ASAP after the event. While the impression is still fresh, group your candidates into: Best matches, possible matches, and no matches. View each candidate as a potential customer or future client, and tailor your follow up message to each group.

Ultimately though, the success – or failure – an individual or employer has with the ATS isn’t solely technology-based, says Saïd Radhouani, Ph.D., co-founder of Nextal, a collaborative applicant tracking system.

“I believe that the ultimate success depends on how the ATS is used, and not on how it’s set up,” said Radhouani. “Yes the implementation and functionality has an impact, but even if the setup is good, it doesn’t mean that recruiters won’t make mistakes.”

When a recruiter starts using a new ATS, they often won’t understand all the features and functionality, says Radhouani. As time goes on, they sometimes fail to learn new functionalities, and don’t maximize the systems capabilities. So recruiters within the same organization who use the same system should meet monthly to collaborate and share experiences, functionalities, and tips on how to best optimize their applicant tracking system.

“Recruiters should also attend webinars put on by the ATS vendor,” said Radhouani. “If recruiters know other colleagues from different companies who are using the same ATS, reach out to them to see how they are using it to ensure they are getting the most out of their ATS.”

And if the ATS vendor has a community forum, be active in the forum, ask questions and provide feedback.

Recruiters should be sure to measure success – and failure – in their recruiting by using the analytics/metrics capabilities of their ATS.

“Most modern applicant tracking systems have analytics capabilities that provide very insightful metrics about the entire recruiting process,” says Radhouani. “If a recruiter doesn’t measure what they do, they’ll never know whether they’re improving their productivity or not.”

Over time, recruiters and hiring managers get frustrated if an ATS is not user-friendly, doesn’t have specific functionality and capabilities, and does not help enhance the recruiting process. Applicant Tracking Systems are not all equal, and as hiring managers move from company to company, and use different systems, they can find pluses and minuses of each system they use. The key however, is to take advantage of the functionality of the system that is in place, find what works, and align your recruiting needs with the capabilities of the system.

“If you don’t have what you love, love what you have,” said Radhouani. “Every ATS has its good and bad sides. Recruiters should focus on the good side and work with the ATS, not against it.”

Mayer agrees.

“Really embrace the entire suite of options your ATS provides,” says Mayer. “Automate where appropriate and make sure the ATS provides a candidate experience that aligns line with your employment brand.”

Want to learn more about latest recruiting trends? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted November 03, 2016 by

The hidden benefits of an internship that goes bad

Internships lead to career path

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

No internship is a bad internship.

“That’s what my first boss said to me when I started as an experiential education advisor,” said Amy Bravo, senior director of international and experiential education at New York Institute of Technology. “She was right!”

That’s because internships are a test run for the future. And even if a college student or recent college grad completes an internship that makes them realize they no longer want to pursue a certain career path, or the internship isn’t what they hoped it would be, there is still value in completing that internship.

“There are many industries and positions you could pursue in your field of study,” says Bravo. “One industry or position might not be the best fit for your values, interests or skills, but another will be.”

As many interns have learned, internships don’t always confirm that one’s choice of career paths was the right one, says Mark Babbitt, CEO and Founder of YouTern, a web site and community that connects college students and recent college grads to high-impact internships and mentors. “At first, this can lead to frustration, anxiety – even shock,” says Babbitt. “The interns might ask themselves ‘how could I be so wrong?’”

But here’s the reality: There is no better time to be wrong than right now, before your career is well established. “For generations, people have worked at jobs they hated and careers they grew to dread,” says Babbitt. “They felt trapped or obligated. Many were afraid to admit they chose wrong. They feared the idea of starting over even more. So for decades, they worked in a constant state of disengagement.”

“So embrace this time in your life,” says Babbitt. “Instead of being afraid to admit what is clearly a mistake, own it.”

After all, this is the perfect time for a do-over – and perhaps the best opportunity you’ll ever have to become completely focused on exactly what you want. Not what your parents want. Not what you were “supposed” to be. But that person who can really make a difference while doing what they love, says Babbitt.

But don’t quit. In most cases, of course, you’ll want to finish the internship. Even when conflicted, it is important to meet your commitments. Keeping your word is a habit that will serve you well in your career. People will feel comfortable vouching for you. Aside from that, however, there are benefits to finishing what you started.

First, you’ll build the soft skills you can leverage in any career path. Second, you’ll continue to build your personal network. Even better, you can find a mentor. Rather than judge you for a change of heart, a mentor can guide you through this early-career transition.

Alexa Merschel, US Campus Talent Acquisition Leader for Pricewaterhouse Coopers, is on college campuses every day recruiting students for PwC’s internship program. She hears from students who both loved their internship experience, and those who realized the professional services aren’t necessarily for them. She recommends focusing on these areas when completing an internship:

  • Focus on building your network – you never know where it will lead.
  • Investigate all opportunities – it is amazing the opportunities that exist in a firm/company outside of the one you may be currently interning within.
  • Observe the culture – Understand the culture of the organization you are interested in working for, and base that off of the culture you experienced while interning.

All internships do provide value, even if you don’t realize it now. Follow these tips from Bravo to continue to gain from your internship.

  • Write down the pros and cons: What worked and what didn’t? What about it didn’t satisfy your interests in this field? What did you like or learn? Which of your career values did it match (autonomy, location, hours of work)? “Once you shorten the list to essentials you need in a job, start looking for opportunities that match those,” says Bravo.
  • Build your network: You spent a few months at your internship and likely met people of influence and interest. Build on that network. Ask a few professionals with positions that you were interested in for an informational interview. Learn about their career path and the twists and turns they likely took. Finding the right fit usually takes time.
  • Be open to a variety of opportunities: Focus on what you like doing and what you do well. You are more than your major and you can transfer your knowledge and skills to hundreds of positions. You’ll need to confidently convey your value to the next employer.

Even if you’ve already graduated, utilize the resources of your college career services department.

And then, embrace your next challenge and go for it.

“When an internship shows you that a different career path is right for you, don’t think of it as abandoning ship,” says Babbitt. “Think of it as ‘I’m finally steering my ship in the right direction. My direction!”

Need help finding a great internship? Register with College Recruiter and search for internship opportunities. Don’t forget to follow us on TwitterLinkedInFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted November 01, 2016 by

Why recent college grads shouldn’t overlook manufacturing industry careers

Photo courtesy of stockunlimited.com

Photo courtesy of stockunlimited.com

Seeking a career in manufacturing? Recent college grads should be sure to know this:

Manufacturing today is not your grandparent’s manufacturing. Take a job at a door and window company. Saying one works at a door and window company may not sound cool. But saying one works at an industry leader that has more than 75 active patents, is constantly developing new products, and creating new composite materials while using Smart Home sensors to revolutionize the door and window company – now that sounds cool. The company doing just that is Andersen Corporation, an international window and door manufacturing enterprise employing more than 10,000 people at more than 20 locations, with headquarters near St. Paul, MN.

“The misconception that we hear most often is that there is nothing cool and innovative about doors and windows,” says Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition Lead at Andersen Corporation.

At the core, recent college grads may view manufacturing careers as factory jobs – partially thanks to old stereotypes bestowed by parents and grandparents. But look closer and dig deeper – and recent college grads will find opportunities with innovative companies using cutting edge technology, engineering, and research and development to manufacture the next big thing.

The manufacturing industry allows recent college graduates to pursue “innovative, creative, and hands-on careers developing, testing, and reinventing products using the latest technologies and environmental and sustainability best practices,” says Swenson.

Jobs to be filled

There are roughly 600,000 unfilled manufacturing job openings in the United States and employers are demanding highly skilled workers in order to meet their needs, according to Manpower’s Future of the Manufacturing Workforce report.

“We are at a turning point in the manufacturing workforce environment in North America,” says Tom Davenport, author of the report. “There are major changes underway in the demand and supply for manufacturing workers – many driven by new technologies that will require new strategies and tactics for both companies and employees.”

Employers such as Andersen are seeking recent college grads and entry-level employees with these backgrounds:

  • Engineering: Chemical, mechanical, manufacturing, industrial, material science, plastics, electrical, environmental
  • Supply chain: Logistics, operations, sourcing, finance and accounting, IT, marketing, sales, human resources
  • Talent acquisition: staffing, generalist, learning and development, HRIT, communications, safety, sustainability, disabilities management, facilities, customer service, administrative support

According to Manpower’s Future of the Manufacturing Workforce report, employers also need skilled workers in roles that require extensive training such as machinists, operators, craft workers, distributors, and technicians. The industry also faces a generational skills gap as existing employees are nearing retirement age, creating an even greater demand for workers, especially those with engineering and IT backgrounds, says Swenson.

To fill those gaps, employers like Andersen are working hard to connect with job seekers at colleges and universities across the country. Campus recruiting is crucial in the manufacturing and current college students should pay close attention to campus recruiting fairs to find out when they can connect with manufacturers.

When searching for internships in the manufacturing industry, be sure to research the company before applying, or meeting at a campus recruiting event. Prepare in advance to secure an internship with a manufacturing company.

“Our interns are a true pipeline of talent for full-time positions as interns have the first opportunity to interview for any open opportunities before they leave at the end of the summer,” says Swenson. “We have converted a number of interns into full-time roles over the last few years.  In addition to meeting students at campus events, we begin our interview process on campus, and then invite our top candidates for additional interviews on site, as well as to tour our facilities.”

Soft skills important

Recent college grads must also have the soft skills employers seek. Those include communication, collaboration, leadership, curiosity, drive, determination, problem solving, and the ability to build relationships, says Swenson.

Women in Manufacturing

Careers in manufacturing provide wonderful opportunities for women, and employers and organizations are working hard to promote these opportunities. Women in Manufacturing is a more than 500-member-strong non-profit national association dedicated to supporting, promoting and inspiring women pursuing or working in a career in the manufacturing industry. Manufacturing Day is a nationally recognized event that is designed to expand knowledge and improve the general public perception of manufacturing careers, including those for women.

“There are a wide variety of rewarding roles both directly in the manufacturing environment and supporting manufacturing that can be attractive to women,” says Swenson. “Being a part of a team that creates a tangible product that enhances the beauty and energy efficiency of people’s homes is very rewarding for the window and door industry in particular. IT, engineering, sales, marketing, and many other opportunities exist at manufacturing companies just like they do at service and retail organizations. I would encourage women to think outside the traditional stereotype of manufacturing and realize that there are many ways to contribute to a manufacturing company’s success.”

Andersen also partners with organizations like the Society of Women Engineers to share the story of the company, as well as the stories of the number of women leaders in all areas at Andersen.

“It is important for us to continue the conversation about women in manufacturing, as well as celebrate and share the success of women in this industry so students see beyond the stereotype,” says Swenson.

When searching for opportunities in manufacturing, recent college grads should look for employers who provide training and growth opportunities. Andersen provides a number of career development programs for recent college grads that focus on research, development and innovation, operations, logistics, sales leadership, sales development, product manufacturing, lean/six sigma, and much more. Anderson also offer new college grads an opportunity to connect with other young Andersen professionals as they onboard into the company through the Andersen Young Professionals Network’s (AYPN), which helps support and help young employees grow by providing additional opportunities to engage cross functionally, learn developmental skills, and build relationships.

Top manufacturing employers understand the need to stay on top of recruiting trends to attract top talent.

“In order to continue to be the leader in our industry for over 110 years, we are constantly being innovative and staying competitive in our market place,” says Swenson.

Recent college grads can find many exciting and innovative opportunities in the manufacturing industry. Check them out. Your grandparents and parents will be surprised – and proud you did. And so will you.

Want to learn more about manufacturing careers? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition/Campus Relations at Andersen Corporation

Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition/Campus Relations at Andersen Corporation.

Jennifer Swenson is a Talent Acquisition Lead and Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at Andersen Corporation, where she manages the company’s college relations and summer internship experience. Swenson is working to continue to build the Andersen brand on campuses across the country, as well as drive strategies to increase diversity and talent pipelines, as well as consistently create an excellent candidate experience. Connect with Jennifer on LinkedIn.

Posted September 16, 2016 by

How do you actually hit your diversity recruiting targets?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

We all know diversity needs to be a priority in recruiting, but many of us struggle with this daily.

There are best practices all over the Internet for diversity recruiting — Harvard has a particularly good one — and there are numerous lists of good companies for diversity, including Black Enterprise’s version and Fortune’s version.

There are organizations out there doing diversity recruiting properly, and here’s the central thing all of them have in common: they diversify (logically) their pipelines. If you’re predominantly on-campus, then you’re predominantly going to get the types of students on that campus. But if you’re on-campus and using digital tools and job boards, you can attract a wider grouping. Then, from a numbers perspective and a talent perspective, you’re set up for more success. (more…)

Posted September 07, 2016 by

Analytics and data in recruiting: Don’t let competitors steal your talent

Group of businesspeople at work

Group of businesspeople at work. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Five years ago, Steven Rothberg, founder of CollegeRecruiter.com, rarely heard employers talk about using analytics or data when making hiring decisions.

“Now I can hardly walk down the hall at a recruiting conference or spend 30 minutes on a call with a client and not hear some reference to it,” says Rothberg. “There is no doubt that HR professionals recognize the value in using data-driven decisions, but probably fewer than one percent of employers are good at it.”

Ian Cook, Head of Workforce Solutions at Visier, a company that develops cloud-based applications that enable HR professionals to answer workforce strategy questions, talked about the impact of analytics, specifically to campus recruiting and the hiring of recent college grads, in the College Recruiter article Analytics, data changing way employers recruit, hire college graduates.

“This is no longer a nice to have,” Cook said in that article, referring to the use analytics and data to drive recruiting and hiring decisions. “Everyone knows the game has changed, and if you are not using analytics to play the best you can then you will be left behind.”

The reality is, if you are not using analytics and data, your competitor who already is using analytics to recruit and hire recent college grads and entry-level job seekers probably has already interviewed or hired that candidate that may have once been interested in your company.

“If you don’t dive into analytics, then you are increasing the likelihood that your competitor will be able to scoop up all the great talent that you need,” says Cook.

The move to using big data and analytics for campus recruiting, hiring recent college grads or entry-level employees has been met with resistance by both small and large employers. Many of those employers believe their campus recruiting efforts, combined with a strong social media outreach, and robust campus careers page, drives success recruiting recent college grads or entry-level job seekers.

“We do hear the ‘our college recruiting program is a well-oiled machine’ from some employers,” says Rothberg.

But at the same time, both small and large employers are now successfully using analytics and data to drive hiring decisions. That list includes these three well-known companies:

Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Dylan Schweitzer of Enterprise Rent-A-Car spoke publicly about how they use data to track their sources of hire and that allows them to reduce their spend on schools, job boards, and other sources which are more expensive than their other sources.

Lockheed Martin: Alton Fox of Lockheed Martin mentioned at TalentBlend 2016 that they’re shifting more and more of their university relations budget toward job boards and other virtual sourcing tools because the cost-of-hire is far lower AND the employees are far more productive.

Uber: Uber tests, tests, and tests some more with different job titles, geographic targeting, job descriptions, landing pages, and more. They work with a wide variety of media partners and many of those partners are paid on a performance basis, so if the ads they run work well then Uber keeps working with the media partner and probably increases how much they spend with that partner, says Rothberg. If the ads don’t work well, Uber shifts those resources to better performing sourcing tools.

Using analytics and data to make recruiting and hiring decisions should be viewed as a way to bridge the gaps that can be cause with human oversight or human error. Analytics and data also provide a unique insight that has never been available before. So why not use analytics and data when making hiring decisions?

Many organizations are focused on analyzing candidates, such as by resume parsing or extended social profile analyses, in order to improve their likelihood of landing a great hire, says Cook. Others are taking a more strategic approach and attempting to analyze the workflow and outputs of the recruiting function.

They are looking at questions such as:

  • Can we recruit faster?
  • Are we spending our sourcing dollars in the right place?
  • If we change up our process, do fewer people abandon their applications?
  • Which sources consistently produce employees who stay and perform?

These are complex questions involving multiple data sources, but they are all are aligned to ensuring the function is delivering what the business needs.

“Predominantly, we see industries that need to recruit a lot of high value talent being early adopters or ahead of the game when it comes to talent analytics,” says Cook. “Organizations that hire lots of software engineers or technical medical staff or specialists with financial skills understand the value that comes from being data-driven as opposed to following the old ‘post and hope’ model.”

College Recruiter has been using analytics and data for years, providing employers with specific and organized reports to help achieve their recruiting and hiring goals. But many recruiters and HR professionals simply fear change, or the challenge of implementing analytics into the decision-making process.

“The biggest reason that I see employers resisting the use of data and analytics is the fear of math,” says Rothberg.

Here is an example: Rothberg recently asked the head of HR for a 5,000-employee company if they would like a detailed proposal that walked through the outcomes of the various recruitment advertising packages being considered. This proposal included projections on the number of candidates that would be sent to that company’s applicant tracking system from College Recruiter, how many would apply, how many would be hired, time-to-hire, and cost-per-hire.

“She asked what I needed and I asked her how many people she wanted to hire and over how many months,” recalls Rothberg. “She didn’t know. I asked how many applications she would expect to generate for every 1,000 clicks we sent to her ATS. She didn’t know. I asked how many hires she would make for every 100 applications. She didn’t know. As unfortunate as all of that was, she didn’t want to know. She was the head of HR for a 5,000 person company and she didn’t want to admit that math scared her.”

Don’t let analytics scare you. Employers, both large and small, are using analytics to drive talent decisions. Dive in, before your competitors steals your next great hire.

“We can always find ways to save a little money, hire a little faster, diversify a little more, and hire people who perform a little better and are retained for a little longer,” says Rothberg. “Data and analytics help us identify those areas where we can improve, whether there is only minor or vast room for improvement.”

Wondering how analytics can help drive your recruiting decisions and successes? Contact College Recruiter today to learn more, and be sure to Check out our blog and follow us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Posted August 26, 2016 by

Back-to-school free resume critique

Resume writing tips written on notebook courtesy of Shutterstock.com

kenary820/Shutterstock.com

College and university students who are starting their fall semesters know that right after Labor Day the frenzy of on-campus recruiting begins. There’s a little bit of a breather from mid-November until the beginning of January and then the frenzy continues through March.

When was the last time someone with training reviewed your resume and made specific recommendations to you for how it could be better? Are you missing keywords that employers will find when they’re searching a database? Is your language active instead of passive? Do you have specific accomplishments listed? Are your career goals spelled out clearly? (more…)

Posted August 18, 2016 by

Why building great relationships with career services benefits employers

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Employers and career services offices/college campuses each play important roles in the lives of college students and recent graduates. Employers can provide entry-level jobs and internship opportunities to students and graduates; the former can be their first real jobs and the latter offer them valuable work experience preparing them for those first real jobs. Career services offices and campuses guide college students not just academically but professionally also. Career services professionals can help with various parts of the job search such as writing resumes and cover letters, interview preparation, and networking. While recruiters are partners for employers in finding young, top talent to fill job openings, they are often not the only ones.

Building great relationships with career service offices and campuses is a smart move for employers, recruiters, and hiring managers. If companies know the type of job candidates they need, and colleges have them, then it’s a win-win for both sides. Employers gain access to communicate directly with qualified candidates, and career services offices and campuses connect college students and recent graduates with internship and job opportunities. Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean for Career and Professional Development at Whittier College, highlights her school’s relationship with Peace Corps.

“There are several employers who come to mind that have built great working relationships with Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development (CCPD), but the stand-out employer for the CCPD team is the Peace Corps.

Peace Corps has a terrific talent acquisition approach which appeals to students and emerging professionals. Nick Leichliter and Tiffany Tai, the Peace Corps recruiters assigned to Whittier College, partnered with us to design customized on-campus recruiting sessions. The Peace Corps recruiting sessions included two employer meet-and-greet roundtables, coffee talks, one hiking session (with a Peace Corps dog), and two classroom presentations. Nick and Tiffany also provided one-on-one coaching to Whittier College students offering our students tips to succeed with the intensive Peace Corps application process. Peace Corps extra efforts paid off, and the organization received a record amount of resumes and attention at the annual Career and Internship Fair.

Our partnership with Peace Corps continues to deepen. The CCPD’s goal for this year is to establish the Peace Corps Prep certificate under the auspices of the Whittier College Early Talent Identification Program.”

Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean of Whittier College's Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development

Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean of Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development

Employers, want more advice on recruiting? Reach out to College Recruiter for help and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Assistant Dean Deborah Pratt leads a dynamic team of career development professionals at Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development. In this role, she drives the strategic vision and blueprint for the college to transition from a traditional career services business operation to a four-year career development college-wide approach and program.

Posted July 10, 2016 by

Networking events on campus give students workplace preview

Hr. photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Recruiters typically head to college campuses every fall. They will be looking for the best and brightest students with the potential to fill internships and entry-level jobs. However, other recruiters will not travel to schools or may limit travel because of the costs; they would prefer job seekers come to them, find candidates online, or may recruit through other means, such as through target email campaigns and banner ads.

Recruiters who opt out of campus recruiting entirely might miss out on the face-to-face interaction with college students interested in learning more about specific employers. Attending at least some of the networking events on college campuses not only allows recruiters to make their presence known but also helps students gain a better understanding of the workplace. John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University, highlights why recruiters and employers should visit college campuses.

“I think it is important for recruiters to actively attend networking events on university and college campuses to assist with developing college students’ understanding of the working world, and begin identifying the marketable skills and abilities essential in that specific area of employment. Employers who attend networking events on university and college campuses have immediate access to college students from various economic and cultural backgrounds while connecting information to students about opportunities for the company or organization they are representing. This information can be helpful for short and long-term career goal setting and connecting students to professionals in the fields of work they are interested in.”

For more advice on professional networking, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University

John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University

John Link is the Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri. An Indiana native, John spent time working at Indiana State University’s Career Center in career programming before making the move to St. Louis. Prior to working in higher education, John worked as an elementary teacher in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and served as an instructional coach to assist teachers in further developing their math and science teaching skills. John enjoys working in career development and helping define students’ career goals through personalized career coaching.

Posted March 23, 2016 by

Planning for college recruitment

Creating a college recruitment program from scratch is a daunting task. This 3-part video series featuring The WorkPlace Group (WPG) experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, provides talent acquisition leaders with suggestions and guidelines for starting their own college recruitment programs.

The video series is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace. Part 1 provides talent acquisition professionals tips about getting started when planning a college recruitment program.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

The first place to start when planning a college recruitment program is to identify objectives for developing a college recruitment program. This helps identify internship opportunities within the organization; this transfers into considering which degrees match up with internship needs. After this, employers must consider their resources. Resources include not only budgetary items but also time, staffing hours, and travel time.

Dr. Demetriadou advises her clients to determine “what [they] need, where [they] need it, and how much [they] are willing to invest in the process.”

Part 2 helps college recruiters with the school selection process.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Once college recruiters have identified their objectives and resources, it’s time to do an environmental scan. One of the factors to consider is geography. Will staff need to travel to conduct campus recruiting visits and OCIs (on campus interviews)? Will students need to travel to visit the employer facility/headquarters?

Another factor to keep in mind is diversity, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. If the university is large, but the demographics do not offer a diverse candidate pool, recruiters may want to remove the university from the target list or consider re-prioritization.

It’s also important to consider whether it’s more beneficial to recruit nationally or regionally. It may be helpful to create a tiered list for college recruiting.

Consider the curriculum at the universities. Do they match with the available internships and entry-level jobs?

These are just a few of the factors to consider when doing an environmental scan when planning for college recruitment.

Part 3 wraps up the college recruitment planning process and discusses how to narrow down the school selection list.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Although there is no such thing as having too large a list of schools during the planning phase or beginning stages of the college recruitment planning process, Dr. Steven Lindner mentions that part of the college recruitment process is narrowing down the target list for college recruiting. He reminds viewers that there is a difference between visiting schools and recruiting from them.

In the beginning, it’s great to keep college recruiting options broad to ensure meeting objectives. However, as recruiters consider their resources, they must narrow down the target list significantly in order to work within the constraints of their budgets.

Dr. Demetriadou reminds viewers to “think big, but implement small.”

Continue reading our blog for more featured articles with The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou. For more videos and tips about the timeline for developing a great college recruitment program, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.