• 4 winning resume tips for recent graduates

    August 01, 2016 by
    Businessman passing document to businesswoman photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    You don’t like getting spam, do you? Well, neither do hiring managers. It may be quick and efficient to upload your resume on popular job sites and send employers the same robo-resume, but hiring managers view these generic, mass mailings as spam. They can spot one-size-fits-all resumes in a nano-second and quickly discard them.

    Here are four tips from hiring managers featured in the book, Graduate to a Great Career, on how to create a winning resume:

    1. Add a short profile statement and your key selling points at the top “above the fold”

    Realize your resume is an ad for branding yourself. Like a newspaper, an ad, or web page, the most important “real estate” is in the top half of your resume. Branding resumes begin with a profile or qualifications statement, a couple of crisp sentences that define your value. A strong profile statement is critical for recent graduates. You don’t have an impressive job title and career history yet, so you’ll need to specify your career focus and value proposition in your profile statement. In fact, many hiring managers told me a big problem with new graduate resumes is it can be hard to determine what entry-level job the new grad is looking for, especially if the grad doesn’t have a career-specific major like accounting or computer science. A profile headline like “Seeking an entry-level positioning” is too generic and doesn’t convey your career path. Remember, it’s your job to convey your career identity, not the hiring manager’s. For example, a recent grad named Erin who was a psychology major pursuing a career in marketing began her profile with the headline, “Aspiring marketing assistant: Psychology grad with pulse on the consumer mindset,” followed by a few bullets outlining her focus, strengths, and marketing credentials through two internships.

    2. Expand your skill set to take advantage of new market opportunities

    Be willing to take advantage of where the momentum is in the marketplace. During her job search for marketing jobs, Erin, our aspiring marketer mentioned above, noticed big retailers were advertising entry-level jobs and internships in merchandising, an area related to marketing that involves selecting products and evaluating sales performance. She decided to expand her job search and pursue both career paths: merchandising and marketing. Because there were a lot of merchandising internships online, she snagged a three-month, part-time internship at a large global retailer. But Erin needed a different elevator pitch and resume to apply for full-time merchandising jobs, and now with her internship, she had a story to tell. She had a hands-on role in compiling trend and competitive analysis reports, which gave her specific marketable skills. Here is Erin’s new profile statement for her merchandising resume, “Merchandising assistant with strong analytic, merchandising, and marketing skills.” She included new skills such as “completed Excel reports for accurate demand forecasting that resulted in a 10% improvement in accurate buying.” Before long, Erin was offered a merchandising job at a top global retailer.

    3. Play to keywords and how the resume robots screen resumes.

    The first “person” your resume has to impress is not likely to be a human being but a computer. Due to the volume of resumes that large and medium-sized companies receive, most companies use ATS (applicant tracking systems). Most ATS’s are not kind to new grads since they are programmed to check for a strong keyword match. Since most recent grads have limited experience, they don’t score high on an ATS (Only 25% of resumes make it past the resume robots). If you do have a strong skills match with a job posting, take the time to use the same exact words in your resume so the resume robots pick them out. Your resume can also be discarded if you format it incorrectly. Keep the layout simple with commonly used section titles like profile, work experience, education, etc.

    4. Emphasize skills, experience, and results in the “Action + Numbers = Results” format.

    Employers now give twice as much importance to specific skills and work experience as academic courses and grades. How do you make your abilities and skills stand out when you’re a new grad with limited work experience? It might take more effort than for an experienced job seeker, but you have more experience and accomplishments than you realize. Make a list of everything you’ve ever accomplished in internships, school projects, volunteer activities, part-time jobs, and the like. Then, follow this formula to create a powerful results bullet:

    Action + Numbers = Results

    Did [A] + as measured by [N] = with these results [R]

    Here are a few examples of how college students and recent grads have created marketable results bullets out of internships and part-time jobs:

    • Raised $55,000 in first month calling alumni for university capital
    campaign; the top student performer all four weeks.

    • As a brand ambassador interning at X Company, challenged to increase
    website traffic, wrote ten blog posts that generated over 240 responses,
    and helped boost sales.

    • Prepared detailed Excel reports and pitches for business development
    group at fast-growing technology company that
    increased response rate by 15%.

    The key to a successful resume and job search is to go for quality over quantity. You need to invest a little more time to create a resume that is right for each job, but it will pay off. Your efforts will be rewarded, and you’ll be on your way to an interview in no time.

    Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

    Catherine Kaputa, guest writer

    Catherine Kaputa is a Personal Brand Strategist, Speaker, and Author of the newly-released book, Graduate to a Great Career: How Smart Students, New Graduates, and Young Professionals Can Launch Brand You. (April 2016. graduatetoagreatcareer.com). She is the author of two best-selling books, You Are a Brand and Breakthrough Branding for entrepreneurs. She is the Founder of SelfBrand (selfbrand.com). Speaking clients include Google, PepsiCo, Microsoft, Intel, Citi, Merck, Northwestern University, New York University, and University of Illinois.

  • How employers can maximize relationships with career services

    July 14, 2016 by

    Most successful college recruitment plans include strategic relationships with key colleges and universities. One of the best ways to develop relationships with colleges and universities is by developing relationships with career services professionals on target campuses. This three-minute video, featuring The WorkPlace Group Executive Partner, Dr. Steven Lindner, explains how employers can maximize relationships with career services professionals. Dr. Steven Lindner also explains why talent acquisition leaders this matters in the grand scheme of the hiring process. Dr. Steven Lindner is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Career services matters, Dr. Steven Lindner states, because career services is the avenue for sharing information about job postings with college students on campus. Career services professionals allow employers to access students’ resumes and to participate in career fairs. Career services professionals make employers aware of student organizations and opportunities for sponsoring events held by organizations; for employers, these can be affordable, unique branding and marketing opportunities.

    Dr. Steven Lindner shares two specific tips from The WorkPlace Group with employers.

    1. Invite college students to visit your organization to conduct a site visit.

    Let them experience your company culture and work environment. While conducting the tour of your company headquarters, introduce college students to current interns and recent graduates you’ve hired who are thriving within your organization. Explain your targeted candidate profile and success profile. Keep in mind that students who visit will likely share their experience with other students on campus; try to ensure that students return to campus sharing positive information about your organization.

    2. Be persistent when interacting with career services professionals.

    Remember that career services professionals are incredibly busy and are interacting not only with college students on campus but also with all the employers vying for their attention and assistance. One of the best times to reach out to career services professionals is during the summer months before students return to campus in the fall.

    For more assistance in improving your relationships with career services professionals, follow College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner for The WorkPlace Group®, is a talent acquisition, assessment, and hiring process expert. Under his leadership, The WorkPlace Group® has helped employers hire thousands of job seekers across 44 different countries. The WorkPlace Group® is a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. In addition to their Recruitment Outsourcing and Project Based Hiring Services, they are one of just a few recruitment providers with specific expertise in College Recruitment.

  • 5 ways first-year college students can take advantage of career services

    July 05, 2016 by

    If you’re gearing up for college as a first-year college student, you’re probably super excited. And nervous. And overwhelmed by a large to-do list… Pack, meet your roommate, scope out the best parking spots, locate your classes, and find decent restaurants near campus. And of course you’ll want to buy your books, meet your academic advisor, and stop by career services during your first semester on campus.

    Career services—what? You’ve only just begun taking college courses—career services is for seniors, right? Wrong. The worst thing you can do is wait until you’re a senior in college to reach out to career services for help.

    This short video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, lists five ways first-year college students can take advantage of career services.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    1.Get to know career services professionals during your first year on campus.

    They’re your greatest allies in your job search. They’ll help you find great opportunities to gain experience, including part-time and full-time jobs, volunteer opportunities, internships and externships. You can begin learning about these opportunities as a first-year college student.

    “Career services professionals are there to help guide and ease your career search. The cost is free, and the things you gain are priceless!” claims Xiaoying Chen, Human Resources Coordinator and former career services professional.

    2. Take skill/interest inventories (free via career services).

    The skill and interest inventories provided by career services are much more in depth and offer way better feedback than the 10-question surveys you might have taken online via social media in the past. There’s a reason career services offices pay for access to these assessment tools; as a college student, you have access to take the assessments at no cost, so why not take advantage of this opportunity to learn about your personality, work style, skills and abilities, and interests? The more you learn about yourself and the better you understand yourself, the more likely you are to choose a degree path/major that suits you well.

    Be sure to take skill/interest inventories as a first-year college student because at most colleges and universities, you have to declare a major course of study by the end of your sophomore year (or when you have earned 60 credit hours).

    3. Begin networking and branding yourself.

    These two long-term activities—or ways of life, really—go hand in hand. If you’re showing people who you are in your best light (what branding is all about), building great relationships (networking) is much more natural and easier.

    Stop by your career services office on campus to ask about ways you can begin networking with employers right away. Career services offices typically host meet-and-greet events to allow students and employers to connect. They also host career fairs on campus and on-campus interviews and informational interviews. Some career services offices even partner with employers to provide site visits to allow students to see what employers do on a daily basis. Be open to suggestions made by your career services professionals and take advantage of opportunities to get to know employers. The sooner you begin branding yourself as someone who’s eager to learn, the better off you’ll be when you begin applying for internships and jobs.

    4. Get involved on campus.

    It’s easy to put your head down, study hard, and focus on grades and nothing else during your first year of college. It’s just as easy to do the opposite and do nothing but party your first year of college. Neither of those are really good options in the long run. If possible, keep your grades up but don’t avoid interacting with people either.

    Join at least one or two organizations with a genuine purpose. Ideally the organizations you join provide you with opportunities to learn or grow in ways you can develop technical or soft skills which you can later list on your resume. Look for opportunities to work as part of a team, opportunities to lead, opportunities to solve problems, and opportunities to put the academic lessons learned in the classroom to use in a creative way outside of the classroom.

    5. Create a draft of a resume or at least a running list (to be converted into a resume later).

    Ideally, you should create a draft of a resume, even if it’s rather sketchy and thrown together during your first year of college. Just get started!

    If you don’t actually lay out your resume in resume format, at least create a running list of your activities, honors and awards, skills, campus involvement, and work and volunteer experience. Keeping up with what you have done and are doing is crucial. Keep this list in Microsoft Word or Google Docs and in the cloud; don’t keep it on a device which can be stolen, damaged, or lost. When you’re ready to create your first real resume, your list will be retrievable.

    For more tips to help you get on the right track to career success, stay connected by following us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

  • 8 networking tips for college students

    June 21, 2016 by

    It’s easy to believe networking is something you can wait to worry about when you begin your job search. This is a classic mistake college students make, though, and one you can’t really afford. For one thing, you’re really building relationships and making impressions people already, whether you intend to or not. You might as well mindfully build positive relationships, make good impressions, and consciously network with people right now. You never know—the connections you make as a sophomore in college could be the connections you need to land an amazing internship your junior year or an even better entry-level management position after college.

    Soak in these eight networking tips in this quick video by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, and you’ll be networking like a pro when you return to campus this fall.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    1.Look around you.

    It’s easy as a college student to stay in your own zone and to focus on studying, dating, and obsessing about your own life. Get out of that zone and smile, greet those around you, and make an effort to meet at least two or three new people on campus per week. On college campuses, you have access to hundreds or thousands of helpful people who you could network with—faculty members, staff members, career services employees, advisors, classmates, and many more. Even if you choose to live off campus, you can make the most of your time on campus before and after class—and even during class when working on team projects—by building great relationships with people.

    2. Get off campus regularly and out of the campus bubble.

    If you want to secure a part-time job or internship while you’re in college, this is key. Visit the Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis Club, and other local professional organizations. You’ll not only learn about the community by joining or attending community functions and meetings, but you’ll have the chance to network with local professionals and leaders, too.

    3. Get involved on campus.

    Select at least two campus organizations to join as a college student. Try to join organizations with a mission or purpose which matches your lifelong goals or career pursuits. While hanging out with your friends is beneficial to your social life, it’s even better to hang out with friends who share a common career goal while you accomplish something together.

    4. Take advantage of your parents’ friends and your friends’ parents.

    Old people can be pretty helpful in connecting you to people who know lots of other people, own companies, manage teams, etc. Never show up at your friend’s house and breeze by his parents on the way to the pool. Always be polite and conversational. If your friend’s parents ask you what you’re doing in school, what you’re majoring in, and what your goals are, stop and have that conversation. It might be the most important conversation you have all summer.

    5. Take advantage of career services on campus.

    Never in your life will you have access to the myriad of free career services and events as you do as a college student. After graduation, you’ll most likely have to pay for these services via career coaches. Career services offices host helpful events year-round like career fairs, etiquette dinners, and mock interviews. Career services professionals typically have great connections to employers and can help you find internships and entry-level job opportunities. You should also take advantage of free online services like the chance to register to search for jobs at CollegeRecruiter.com.

    6. Use social media strategically.

    The time to begin building your reputation online through online branding is as a college student. 94% of employers admit to searching for candidates online before inviting them for face-to-face interviews. Unless you never plan on searching for jobs in your life, it’s too risky to post ridiculous, inappropriate content on social media throughout your college years and then suddenly hope that recruiters won’t find it or won’t care. They will.

    7. Connect with alumni.

    Alumni make great connections because they already have great jobs and typically care about helping students from their alma mater. Your institutional advancement office on campus can help you connect with alumni. Most colleges host events for alumni and often encourage students to attend, too. These events are great networking opportunities for college students. You can also reach out to alumni on social media.

    8. Do good work.

    Finally, the best way to ensure that your contacts will say good things about you and think of you when they hear of great job leads is to consistently do good work. Make great grades, earn awards, and excel in as many areas as you can. Treat people with courtesy, kindness, and consistency, and people will think of you when asked, “Do you know anyone who’s looking?”

    Keep coming back for more networking tips, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

  • Networking tips for college students and recent grads

    June 16, 2016 by
    Businessman and businesswoman chatting in the office pantry photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    To improve their chances of landing entry-level jobs, college students and recent graduates should engage in networking. Professional networking often includes but is not limited to talking to and building relationships with the right people who can advance their careers. Students and recent grads also have to think about branding themselves personally and professionally. Networking is a long process, and students should begin early. So how can job seekers network successfully? Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com, shares two networking tips for college students and recent graduates.

    Join a professional association to explore a career interest. For example, the Project Management Institute is great if you are interested in project management or the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Institute if you are interested in finance. For the best results, attend an event and then ask to meet one-on-one with an association leader. Many professional associations have free or low cost fees for students. Spending three to four hours per month attending networking events and talking with an industry leader is worth 10 hours of online job search.

    Prepare for coffee networking meetings. Come prepared with three to five specific questions written in a notebook to ask professionals about their careers. Make sure none of the questions are answerable with a two minute Google search. Putting 15 minutes of preparation time into developing good questions means you will gather better information and create more effective relationships. I still follow this practice today and it regularly impresses the people I meet.”

    Need more networking tips for your job search? Go to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com

    Bruce Harpham, Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com

    Bruce Harpham is the Founder of Projectmanagementhacks.com, a career development resource, and freelance writer. Bruce’s writing has appeared in CIO, InfoWorld, CSO, ProjectManagement.com, and other publications. Bruce lives in Toronto, Canada.

  • Social media enhances recruiting efforts

    April 06, 2016 by
    Recruitment, human resources, hiring, employment concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

    Social media can enhance the recruiting efforts of hiring managers. Because college students and recent graduates love social media, recruiters should use it to highlight their companies in a positive light. That doesn’t just mean the work itself but also the company culture. One company using social media this way in college recruiting is Lockton.

    More than 5,600 professionals at Lockton provide 48,000 clients around the world with risk management, insurance, employee benefits consulting, and retirement services that improve their businesses. From its founding in 1966 in Kansas City, Missouri, Lockton has attracted entrepreneurial professionals who have driven its growth to become the largest privately held, independent insurance broker in the world and 10th largest overall. For seven consecutive years, Business Insurance magazine has recognized Lockton as a “Best Place to Work in Insurance.”

    Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton, discusses how her company uses social media in college recruiting to reflect its company culture.

    “At Lockton, we recently launched two social media programs to help recruit college students.

    First, we created the hashtag #LocktonLife and began using it on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and in all of our college recruiting materials. Our goal is to show college students what it’s really like working at Lockton and that insurance is more than writing policies and processing claims. Photos and posts with #LocktonLife show associates giving back to the community, having fun inside and outside of work (think ping pong and Mardi Gras), and engaging in wellness activities like Lockton 5k events.

    Then, we invited associates from across the country to join us as brand ambassadors. Using their own personal social media networks, these brand ambassadors shared even more photos and posts using #LocktonLife and encouraged others in their offices to do the same. We now have about 30 brand ambassadors in cities like Washington, D.C., Denver, Houston, and Los Angeles posting pictures of charity events, happy hours, team-building activities, and more.

    On Friday March 4th, we hosted Lockton University Day at our headquarters in Kansas City. Students met, mingled, and learned from young Lockton Associates and leaders, and were encouraged to post on social media using #LocktonLife and tagging us (@Lockton, @LocktonBenefits, and @Lockton_Retire) for the chance to win fun prizes. We hope our social media campaign added some excitement to the event and helped spread the word that Lockton is a rewarding, fast-paced, and fun place to work.”

    If you’re looking for more information on using social media for college recruiting, visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Photo of Kelly Dippold

    Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton

    Kelly Dippold has more than 10 years of experience in recruiting and human relations in both the telecommunications and insurance industries. She joined Lockton in 2010, where she leads teams of college recruiters and has excelled in the company’s entrepreneurial, competitive, and empowering culture. Kelly earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas. Her professional designations and affiliations include Professional in Human Resources (PHR), SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) and Member, National SHRM.

  • Using social media in your job search

    April 04, 2016 by
    Photo of Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Linkedin, Whatsapp, and Instagram homepage on a monitor screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    Gil C/Shutterstock.com

    College students and recent graduates who are passionate about social networking should consider finding internships or entry-level jobs via social media. In order to secure one of these opportunities, they must know what it takes to get one. Diane Domeyer-Kock, Executive Director of The Creative Group, shares tips college students and recent grads should apply when searching for jobs and internships via social media.

    “Competing for a social media internship or an entry-level job can be difficult because many candidates are on a level playing field; they haven’t yet acquired the skills or work experience that will make them stand out. But there are steps college students and recent grads can take to increase their chances of landing an internship or job:

    Start the search early. Research companies of interest, work with your university career center, scour job boards, and reach out to members of personal and professional networks to uncover leads well before the school year ends.

    Get marketing materials in order. Nail down your personal brand and apply it consistently across all channels, including your resume, social media profiles, and portfolio or website. Consider the look, feel, and content.

    Polish your online presence. A strong digital presence consistent with other promotional tools can be a big career asset, attracting the attention of prospective employers. Make sure the information posted online showcases your expertise, passion for social media, and ability to communicate effectively. That means pushing out interesting content and engaging with contacts consistently.

    Demonstrate strong social skills. Work teams communicate in many different ways today: via email, instant messaging, social media, conference calls, and in-person meetings. Show you know how to collaborate effectively and professionally both online and off.”

    Looking for more information on social media for your job search? Check out our blog and learn more on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Photo of Diane Domeyer-Kock

    Diane Domeyer-Kock, Executive Director of The Creative Group

    Diane Domeyer-Kock is Executive Director of The Creative Group (TCG), a specialized staffing service placing interactive, design, marketing, advertising, and public relations professionals. When she’s not managing operations for TCG’s locations across North America or speaking and Tweeting about career and workplace trends, you can find her on a bike or spending time with her husband, five kids, and grandchildren.

  • 4 tips for big impact in college recruiting

    March 25, 2016 by

    When talent acquisition leaders map out their annual college recruiting plans, they should take into account the following four tips, courtesy of The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

    This article includes two brief videos, hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter. The videos are part of a 15-video series featuring The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    1. Take time to plan out the process.

    Think about branding. How are you making your messaging unique? What will help you stand out in the sea of emails, texts, and flyers on campus? How will you help college students remember you compared to other employers?

    2. The early bird gets the worm.

    Register for career fairs early. If you register early, you often get the best spot with more exposure to students who attend. If you wait too long before registering, you may not be able to attend.

    Similarly, don’t wait for events to occur to reach out to students. Begin the communication process before you show up on campus and before candidates arrive on-site for interviews. Keep the doors of communication open at all times.

    3. Think about who will represent you on campus.

    Who will you send to represent you at career fairs and other events? This is a crucial choice in the college recruiting process. If you don’t have a well-trained team, and you send hiring managers or other employees, you should prepare these employees as well as possible. Equip them with a broad understanding of the types of skill sets you’re looking for, which positions are available, and the employer brand you’re attempting to display on campus.

    Be sure that the representative you send to campus events is able to communicate clearly not only about technical skills but is also able to evaluate candidates’ soft skills.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    4. Follow up.

    Following up is key to ensuring success after events end. Many companies ensure huge presence on the day of events but fail to follow up with candidates later. When top candidates weigh their options, employers who have built better relationships stand out.

     

    For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

    Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

     

     

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

  • Selecting schools for college recruiting

    March 24, 2016 by

    When selecting colleges and universities to recruit from, employers must consider a variety of factors.  This article and accompanying video series, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, explore selecting schools for college recruiting in depth and features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    When selecting schools to recruit from, examine the career services office and resources on campus. Does the career services office offer resume books, on-campus interview opportunities, career fairs, or other opportunities for engagement with students? Not every college or university offers these events. When are these events and opportunities available? The school’s event cycle may not match your recruiting and hiring cycle. How much does the school charge for these services/events? Weigh the costs charged by the university when selecting schools to recruit from as well.

    Employers must also consider how many other employers they will be competing against in comparison to the number of students/grads or candidates available. It may be better to be a large fish in a small pond. Unless you have fabulous job offers to present, you might not be able to attract top talent.

    When selecting schools for college recruiting, it’s also important to evaluate student enrollment data. If you need to hire MBA graduates, and the university’s MBA program is not one of its better programs, that school may not be the best fit for your college recruiting program.

    The next video provides tips about narrowing down their list of schools to recruit from.

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Employers should never be afraid to narrow down their target list for selecting schools for college recruiting from year to year. Recruiters will discover that retention is key; you may get terrific talent, but if you can’t retain star employees long-term, a particular college or university might not be the best fit for your company. The longer you recruit, the more historical data you’ll have to fall back on.

    Always evaluate and assess your data. Ask the career services office for information about where their students are finding employment. Most career services directors are willing to partner with employers; career services directors who are willing to go above and beyond can help make up for lack of services and events they may not provide. Career services employees can provide employers with the chance to brand themselves on campus and to gain much-needed exposure on campus; they also keep employers in the loop and introduce recruiters to faculty members. Relationships with faculty members prove key in the college recruiting process.

    In the last video, experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou discuss the need to adapt recruiting strategy from school to school.

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    The WorkPlace Group experts encourage adaptation of strategy based on the situation and school. There may be some times when it’s appropriate to post jobs online only, and some situations when it’s better to have a strong on-campus presence. It’s important to have a tiered structure around college recruiting. Not all colleges and universities are the same; whatever amount of effort you put into college recruiting will determine your outcomes.

    For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

    Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

     

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

     

     

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

  • LinkedIn tip #1: Background photo selection

    March 07, 2016 by

    Joining LinkedIn is the easy part. Learning how to make the most of LinkedIn when searching for jobs and networking online takes a bit more work.

    Over the next two weeks, College Recruiter will publish social media expert Chaim Shapiro’s top 10 LinkedIn tips.

    Today’s tip, tip #1, provides a brief overview of LinkedIn profiles and offers suggestions on selecting a quality background photo for your LinkedIn profile as well.

    Chaim Shapiro is hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager at College Recruiter. Chaim Shapiro serves as the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College and as a Social Media Consultant, public speaker, and freelance writer.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Shapiro reminds viewers that their LinkedIn accounts appear differently in edit mode than in “view profile as” mode. He also encourages viewers to think carefully about background photo selection. Many LinkedIn users do not use their background photos effectively and appropriately. Shapiro believes background photo selection is part of branding and self-promotion; therefore, users shouldn’t simply select canned or stock photos to display behind their profile photos.

    Follow College Recruiter’s blog for links to Chaim’s Top 10 LinkedIn tip videos and accompanying articles and follow us on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

    Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.