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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 22, 2016 by

Recruiters’ failure to follow-up hurts networking

Emotional stress, frustration, telephone photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Attending networking events on college campuses is a great way for recruiters and hiring managers to interact with and build relationships with college students. By engaging in conversations with college students, recruiters and hiring managers can find potential candidates for entry-level jobs, internships, or other career opportunities. It is also important to keep in mind that networking is a two-way street. While it is important for students to follow-up with recruiters, recruiters should do the same.

One mistake some recruiters make is not following up during the hiring process. This can not only create a less impressive candidate experience but can also a company or organization’s reputation. Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), discusses the negative effect left on college students when recruiters do not follow up during the hiring process.

“The single biggest mistake we often see recruiters and hiring managers make during the hiring process is a lack of follow-up or follow-through. College students will come to us and say ‘I never heard back from (recruiter) at (name of company) – Should I follow up with them?’ This lack of following through on communicating with students is damaging to an organization’s brand, and it leaves them with an unfavorable view of the organization. It especially does when you consider the contact management software available today.”

For more advice on networking, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

Kevin Fallon serves as the Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), where he leads the delivery of career and professional development services to more than 8,000 students enrolled in, as well as alumni from 42 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs in business, education, science and technology, and the liberal arts. Prior to joining Salisbury, Fallon’s 22-year career included talent acquisition and talent development leadership roles with global Fortune organizations such as PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Accenture, and Bank of America, as well as university career services leadership roles with the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland College Park and Rider University in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

Posted July 15, 2016 by

Using career services’ budget to connect college students

Hand holding money photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

College career services offices are designed to help prepare college students create career paths. Whether helping college students continue their education or finding internships and entry-level jobs, these offices have the resources and tools students need for succeeding in the job search. The career services professionals on college campuses can even share their personal experiences to give students a better idea of what to expect in the real world.

However, while having resources, tools, and professional advice is nice, how can career services offices improve to attract more college students? Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University, discusses how these offices can center their budgets around collaboration and creativity to connect students with career services offices and other events.

“Collaboration and creativity are the name of the game when it comes to ensuring our budget can be utilized in such a way that we are reaching the greatest number of college students. In a time of shrinking operating budgets, we focus our efforts on developing strong relationships with departments across campus and pool resources to have the greatest impact on students. We have also found a great amount of success in collaborating with student organizations to co-sponsor events. The student group will conduct much of the marketing of an event, as well as fund refreshments, and the career center will organize the content and/or guest speakers.

Another area of potential collaboration is with employers. Many employers are seeking ways to brand their organizations on college campuses, and career centers are seeking ways to connect their students with internship and employment opportunities. One such example was a “Fall Fest” sponsored by an employer. We organized pumpkin decorating, s’mores, hot chocolate, and a fire pit. Turnout at the event was tremendous and offered an opportunity to not only brand the employer, but also market the services of our career center. The event came at no expense to our office.”

For college career services offices looking for more advice, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University

Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University

Nichole Lefelhoc is the Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University. Nichole helps prepare college students for success after graduation and in their chosen careers. She has a responsibility to make sure the career center offers the appropriate services and resources for this to happen. This could mean anything from career exploration, professional image, and resumes/cover letters to internships, job searching, interviewing, and graduate school.

Posted June 30, 2016 by

Networking on college campuses builds relationships

Human resources photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Building a relationship with anyone requires time and effort. Once a relationship is established, both parties must work to maintain it. If recruiters and hiring managers want to really connect with college students, they should consider showing up on college campuses. These are networking opportunities not only for students but also for employers. Employers can create connections by personally interacting with college students, answering their questions, or by handing out business cards or other company information. Recruiters and hiring managers who spend time and energy on college campuses can not only network with students but also potentially build long-term relationships with schools. Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific, shares his thoughts on the importance of recruiters attending networking events on college campuses.

“It’s important for organizations with ongoing hiring needs at the college degree level to build and maintain excellent working relationships with their target institutions. Many times, it takes a year or two for given organizations to begin building strong brand reputations at colleges and universities that will attract the top caliber talent they (and other employers) desire.

Creating good recruiting relationships means you want college students talking to and talking up your organization to other students. Nothing is more powerful than trusted friends making a referral based on their own first-hand experience. Approved sponsorship opportunities with key student groups can also help cultivate student recognition of your organization.

Developing a strong partnership with the college’s career services operation is probably the most important thing an organization can do. Doing so can open all kinds of opportunities to engage students and even faculty potentially. In my 20 plus years doing this, I have seen time and again those employers who commit to long-term relationships with schools (i.e., don’t abandon the relationship even when employers are not hiring or there may be a market downturn) will be the most successful.”

Learn more on the importance of networking on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione is the Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific. Tom earned a Ph.D. in Counseling from Ohio University, specializing in college student career development. Tom has 22 years of progressively, responsible experience in career services/placement and university student affairs and works extensively with employers seeking to hire college students or alumni.

Posted April 09, 2016 by

5 resume writing tips for recent graduates

Resume writing tips written on notebook courtesy of Shutterstock.com

kenary820/Shutterstock.com

Irrespective of the profession, when it comes to finding a suitable job, candidates need well written resumes to present themselves as the most suitable candidates in front of prospective employers. The document provides brief information about education, skills, and prior work experience candidates may possess. It is equally important for job seekers without making any discrimination on the basis of education, skills, experiences, and the nature of the job. It is necessary for individuals searching for senior positions or entry-level vacancies.

People have several misconceptions about resume writing, about including and excluding things, and formatting. Such misconceptions can be easily rectified after observing templates available on the web. But the real battle starts when new college graduates or individuals lacking the relevant job experience are writing resumes to brand themselves to employers. Nearly all new graduates start complaining that their resumes fail to create the right impression and are unable to help them to get a job interview call. 90% of the applicants think they are not being selected due to possessing zero or limited experience.

Although education and level of expertise matters to get good jobs with high status and to some extent, it is also a requirement for entry-level jobs. Obviously, no one will hire job seekers with inadequate and irrelevant education. Recent graduates might be experiencing the same situation. Despite possessing the relevant education and internship experiences, if grads are experiencing the same situation, they will actually need to recheck their resumes to know what they are missing.

Here are a few simple resume writing tips recent graduates have to keep in mind while creating their resumes to get internships or entry-level jobs in their relevant career fields.

1. Start with your personal information

Carefully, start by adding personal information like your full name, contact number, address, and an email address you check on a regular basis. Avoid misspelling these credentials, as they can be mistyped more frequently.

2. Write an effective objective statement

The career objective section is crucially important, and it should be added just after the contact credentials. In addition to placing it correctly, the objective must be very concise, covering the key components like the position you are applying for, the profession, and the most relevant skills. It enables your resume to stand out among the hundreds and thousands of resumes an employer might be sifting through.

3. Sensibly add educational information

Being recent graduates, the education section on their resumes is extremely important. Some candidates might not possess internship experience, and all they have are their degrees and certifications. Recruiters usually short-list candidates for entry-level and internship positions on the basis of their educational qualifications. Therefore, candidates must be very careful while adding and organizing educational information on their resumes. Start by adding the most recent degree and also mention the net GPA if it is three or more; don’t add the GPA if it is less than three. It’s better to mention the GPA of particular major if it is high enough. Don’t add unnecessary information about high school; instead, concentrate on current activities, work experiences, and accomplishments during college.

4. Consider adding the link of your professional profile

Although recent graduates are not classifying themselves into professional groups, they shouldn’t hesitate to create professional profiles on any of the suitable websites like LinkedIn. Grads are in the process of starting careers as professionals and should not underestimate themselves. Adding their professional profile links or portfolio links, in case they have made them during or after college, will portray a positive image of graduates’ personalities. It reveals they are eager to become professionals, and possess an innate love for specific career fields.

5. Use action verbs over pronouns

Don’t use first person or second person to describe yourself in a resume. Refrain using “I” or “me”. Also avoid using your name to talk about yourself in third person like “Anna is a fresh graduate” or “she is willing to join.” The best way to illustrate skills and accomplishments is using a few action verbs like created, developed, or managed under the heading of the department where someone might have worked. They give a natural tone to job seekers’ documents. Recruiters are well aware that candidates applying for entry-level jobs either don’t have work experience or that they lack the experience required to a vital job.

After considering these simple tips and tricks, recent graduates will be able to write effective resumes to obtain desirable entry-level jobs according to their educational qualifications.

For more resume writing tips to benefit your job search, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Jenessa Baxter

Jenessa Baxter, guest writer

Author Bio: Jenessa Baxter is a Digital Marketer for Ultimate Recruitment Agency in Dubai. She writes about HR recruitment tips, leadership, HR management, and career consulting. Follow her on twitter @iamjenessabax

Posted March 21, 2016 by

Social media showcases job seekers’ skills

Social media symbol courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Arcady/Shutterstock.com

While many college students embrace social media for personal use, it also serves a professional purpose. Using social media websites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and others help job seekers create a brand for themselves based on who they are and what they can offer employers. With recruiters and hiring managers using social media to find job candidates, showcasing relevant skills is important for all job seekers, including college students and recent graduates.

• Create a personal brand – Your personal brand represents who you are and what you have to offer. It is what separates you from everyone else. Recruiters need to know if potential candidates have a brand that fits their company culture.

Lean on LinkedIn – LinkedIn is a networking website for professionals. College students can highlight their skills and areas of expertise, as well as connect on LinkedIn groups based on their career fields. Through connections on the site, you can express their interests in career fields, and learn more about career fields and job opportunities. Another way to show passion for an industry is to write about it. Providing original and unique content demonstrates to recruiters and hiring managers how knowledgeable you are in specific areas.

Use Facebook and Twitter – For job seekers who like keeping up with the latest news in their industries, Facebook and Twitter might interest them. On Facebook, you can participate in groups relevant to your career field and learn more about potential employers who are searching for the best job candidates. On Twitter, while there aren’t groups, you can use hashtags with keywords industry insiders will notice, and stay up-to-date with companies. You can also participate in discussions hosted by companies on Twitter, retweet content posted by companies’ Twitter handles, and reply to Tweets by companies with thoughtful comments to gain positive attention by those employers.

Build an online portfolio – Social media profiles give job seekers an opportunity to build online portfolios. Similar to a resume, job seekers should highlight skills and accomplishments relevant their career fields. Consider including articles, photos, and videos for the portfolio.

More than anything else, hiring managers want to know candidates can do the job. Your school, major, GPA, and class projects help hiring managers determine that, so showcasing your accomplishments with related work experience will give you a big leg up on the competition. Use LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and even Facebook to demonstrate qualifications, as many recruiters will Google candidates’ names if they’re interested in hiring you. Be sure that when recruiters search for you online, they find nothing but positive results.

Need more tips on social media related to your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers.

Posted February 26, 2016 by

Focusing on branding in college recruiting

In recruiting college students, recruiters should focus on employer branding. An employer brand represents what a company stands for; it’s why or why not job seekers will work for a business. Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency, explains how his company recruits college students with care and dedication.

Photo of Brian Easter

Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency

“Nebo’s success has been a direct result of our human-centered approach to doing business. It’s because we respect users we’re able to craft successful, long-term strategies for clients over short-term gains; it’s because we love and value clients we build lasting relationships with them; and it’s because we see culture as our competitive advantage we’ve been able to fill the Nebo ranks with the industry’s best people.

As such, we fiercely defend our culture by standing up for our employees at all times. We will fire and have fired clients on the spot when they question the value of our employees’ hard work. Like we’ve always said, Nebo was started to repair a broken industry, and it’s a goal we have in mind at every step.

We’d put the growth opportunities at Nebo against any other agency. More than half of our management positions are staffed by people who started as interns or in entry-level positions. We promote from within to maintain our culture, and we think it’s important to reward good work. We hire people who have potential to grow with the agency, meaning they are passionate, intelligent, have integrity, and want to make the world a better place. We hire people who have a greater mission. Nebo promotes based on merit and does not withhold promotions to make new employees “pay their dues.”

This manner of care and dedication to our employees translates to how we recruit and attract college students to Nebo. We are actively involved with a number of southeastern colleges, particularly the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech, in part because of their vicinities to our Atlanta office, but also because we are an office divided with proud Bulldawg and Jacket grads. Throughout the year, we attend career fairs, advertising, marketing, and PR organizational events, as well as host agency tours.

Whenever we plan an appearance at a college event, we don’t settle for just distributing basic fliers. We want our presence to reflect our unique culture at Nebo. Whether that means a contest guessing the number of jelly beans in a jar, giving away a drone or scholarship money to someone with the most compelling tweet, or personalizing t-shirts to embrace each school, we want students to know we are as excited to be there as they are. We always strive to provide every student with a remarkable experience with the Nebo brand.

Every year, Nebo receives thousands of resumes with a large majority from current college students, so we like to think our approach to engaging college students is working. We’ve made it our mission to create a place where the industry’s top talent comes together to help clients make the world a better place.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

As Co-Founder of Nebo, Brian Easter brings international experience to his role along with a proven track record of helping organizations reach their digital marketing objectives. Under his leadership, Nebo has enjoyed 12 straight years of growth, has never laid a single employee off, and has won over 100 digital awards in just the past years alone.

Posted February 19, 2016 by

Employers benefit from career services offices

As employers focus on best practices in college recruiting, one of the ways they can create a quality candidate experience is to partner with career services offices. These offices serve as resources that can connect recruiters and hiring managers to college students and recent graduates. Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans, shares different ways employers benefit from working with career services offices.

Photo of Orvil Savery

Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans

“Employers can benefit most working with career services offices at colleges or universities by challenging, working with, and lastly, advocating for not the needs of just now but the needs of students and employers five, 10, or 15 years down the road. The future isn’t something we don’t see coming, so simply doing what’s always been done isn’t going to benefit long-term interest. Allowing recruiters and hiring managers more say in what gets built and implemented, all while doing so under the umbrella of a reciprocal, collaborative, and diversified understanding is beneficial to both sides.

Employers benefit from these relationships by having a great pool of applicants, short lead times, heavy brand awareness, needs and wants based programming, and increasing diversity in the workplace.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Orvil Savery is a University of Missouri graduate and lover of all things involving talent management. He serves as a HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans. He is dedicated to nurturing, cultivating, and recruiting an inclusive and diverse workforce in which all employees can deliver results through their own unique skill sets, backgrounds, and perspectives to enhance the lives of our colleagues, clients, and community.

Posted December 15, 2015 by

How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing

Some people may be looking for alternatives to their regular nine-to-five jobs. One option could be freelance writing. Freelance writing not only offers flexibility but can be financially rewarding, depending on how much time and effort writers give it. In the following webinar, How to make more money with an English major doing freelance writing, English majors learn how to navigate the challenges of making money with an English major and the similarities and differences between freelance writing and writing as a full-time job. They will also get an expert’s opinion on building a freelance writing business right out of college and how to figure out if freelance writing is right for them. (more…)

Posted December 07, 2015 by

Value, experience, and cultural fit as reasons for hiring students early

Employers have their own criteria when searching for quality candidates. For example, candidates potentially adding value to a company will interest employers. Experience can also factor into hiring decisions. The more experience candidates have, the better their chances of landing new jobs. Fitting into the company culture is important too because employers need to know that prospective employees reflect a positive image of their companies. Value, experience, and cultural fit are three reasons for hiring students early. (more…)

Posted September 03, 2015 by

5 Important Steps to Follow along with When You’re Obtaining a New Job

jobs red word and arrow on stair up to open conceptual door with view to sky and field on white background

Jobs red word and arrow on stair up to open conceptual door with view to sky and field on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Summary: There are 5 key areas in the job search – which include promoting yourself together with reference letters and developing a powerful professional brand – that will help you find jobs fast.

There are 5 basic steps in a job search. How you perform in most of these areas will determine the speed and also ease with you land a brand new job. Failing to boost your performance for all of these steps can dramatically lower your chances of finding work in just a reasonable time body. (more…)