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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

Linkedin website on a computer screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Ingvar Bjork/Shutterstock.com

Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted March 01, 2016 by

Keeping it old school on social media

Even in the digital age, there’s something warm and fuzzy about throwing it back to the good old days and keeping it old school when using social media. Maybe this seems ironic, but it makes a lot of sense; whether you’re searching for jobs, networking professionally, or connecting with friends, it helps to apply the same communication skills you use when interacting face to face to your online communication via social media. Recruiters and talent acquisition leaders—your future bosses—are looking for employees who exhibit great communication skills. If you can apply the following five tips to your use of social media, you’ll definitely improve your odds of landing internships and entry-level jobs.

This Tuesday Tip video, featuring Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, offers five suggestions for college students and recent grads for using social media old school style.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. If you can’t show Grandma, don’t show anybody.

When using social media platforms, particularly platforms which are image-heavy like Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, avoid posting photos (or posting comments or status updates) containing images or words you wouldn’t show or share with your grandma. If your grandma is a hipster, this rule doesn’t apply to you. Think about the stereotypical grandma who might be offended at the notion of seeing her grandson’s photos of a wild party. That’s the grandma we’re referencing here.

If that mild-mannered, conservative grandma wouldn’t want to see it or read about it, chances are your potential employers don’t want to see it or read about it either. So don’t share it on social media. Remember that just because you think you have your privacy settings locked down doesn’t mean they’re truly secure. Your friends can always tag you in photos. Facebook is publicly traded. And your friends and contacts can also take screen shots of what you post before you realize you need to delete the scandalous content. So play it safe and follow the grandma rule, particularly prior to and during your job search.

2. No phones allowed.

If you’re a traditional college student, your parents can probably tell you lots of stories about what it was like to attend parties and other college functions sans cell phones. Most wild college functions were never documented; the only records that exist of the crazy things that happened at sorority houses in the 80s and 90s live in the memories of the people who attended.

Take notes from the old folks on this one. The benefit to turning off your cell phones at the door of functions with your friends is that you won’t wind up posting any scandalous photos on social media, only to regret those posts later. It might seem fun to share the photos now, but when you begin searching for a job or internship, and employers Google you and find said photos, you’ll wish you’d followed the “no phones allowed” rule once in a while. You might want to suggest to your friends that they follow suit and turn off their phones, too. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find that you have more fun when you aren’t worried about taking selfies or being caught doing something silly.

3. Pay attention; you’re creating a brand.

When sharing, posting, liking, or communicating in any way with your contacts on social media, remember that you’re creating a brand for yourself. As The Police so aptly put it, “I’ll be watching you.” Your contacts—particularly recruiters and potential employers—are watching you. People often pay more attention to your online activity than what you might think. Be sure that you mindfully interact online and treat others with courtesy and kindness. Portray the image of yourself you want others to see. Brand yourself intentionally because if you don’t, you’re still creating a brand; it will just be a personal brand you’ve created haphazardly.

When you interact through social media, commenting thoughtfully on photos and status updates also lets your contacts know that you care about their content. This helps build genuine relationships. This is another way to apply old school communication principles to your online interactions.

4. Request a meeting with professional contacts.

After you’ve interacted with a professional contact online for a while, don’t be afraid to make the suggestion that you meet face to face, to ask for your contact’s phone number, or to request a Skype visit. Taking the next step toward more personal face-to-face interaction is always preferable because it gives you the opportunity to get to know your contact better. Professionals—whether employers or mentors—understand that you are networking in order to gain understanding about your career field and to seek job opportunities. Make your intentions clear when requesting a visit. If you are attempting to learn more about the career field, tell your contact that. If you want to learn about the company your contact works for, state that when you request to meet for coffee.

Most people are open to this type of request if they have time in their schedules. Even if they can’t meet face to face, they can often visit over the phone or online. Moving from social media, like Facebook messaging or direct messaging on Twitter, to a phone call, is a positive step toward building a lasting professional relationship.

5. “As offline, so online.”

This tip comes straight from marketing guru Samantha Hartley, owner of Enlightened Marketing. In the world of social media and electronic communication, people tend to interact more abruptly and to leave their manners at the door. This is a major faux pas if you want to maintain healthy professional relationships with your friends, professional contacts, and coworkers (and land jobs in the future).

Remember that when interacting on social media and through email, it’s just as important to treat people with courtesy, respect, and kindness as it is offline (face to face). As offline, so online.

For more Tuesday Tips and suggestions about using social media effectively in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

 

Posted June 11, 2015 by

Tips for Dressing Right at Your Next Job Interview

Beautiful businesswoman ready to handshake on a white isolated background

Businesswoman ready to handshake on a white isolated background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You’ve prepared for your job interview mentally and academically, but have you done your fashion research? Don’t let your choice of wardrobe for your interview negatively influence all the other positives you have in place. What will work best for your interview varies with each company. Before deciding what to wear to your interview, look into the every day dress code at that company. Then, choose apparel that is a step up from their everyday attire. It is just as important not to seem over-dressed for a casual work environment as it is to dress to impress in a more formal environment. This article will help show you what to wear and what not to wear to a job interview. We will also highlight how important your interview outfit can be. (more…)

Posted June 08, 2015 by

4 career resolutions for 2015

Silhouette person jumping over 2015 on the hill at sunset

Silhouette person jumping over 2015 on the hill at sunset. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As 2015 races towards its half way mark, it is important to take stock of your career resolutions. Regardless of whether you made January resolutions or not, it is never too late to develop some resolutions to help you stay focused when it comes to your career. Working or not, these are four career resolutions you should adopt for 2015. (more…)

Posted May 18, 2015 by

7 enticing tips for recent grads to negotiate salary like nobody else

Show Me The Money card with sky background

Show Me The Money card with sky background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Searching for work can be a daunting task at the best of times. It can be even more difficult if you are looking for work in a niche area. It is possible that in the excitement of obtaining a job you forget the last, most important obstacle. Your salary! This is the main reason for working and the reason you have been studying hard for so many years. It may seem rude or ungrateful to negotiate your salary when you have not even started the job yet; in fact this is one of the best opportunities to go through this process.

The majority of bosses will have more respect for you if you negotiate on your salary. The following tips will ensure you remain professional: (more…)

Posted March 23, 2015 by

Six Of The Quickest Ways To Move Into A Leadership Position With Your Career

Successful woman leading a business group and looking happy

Successful woman leading a business group and looking happy. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Chances are when you begin a new job, you aren’t aspiring to stay in that same position forever. Indeed, you’re probably hoping that throughout your time with the company, you’ll gradually move up throughout the ranks. To help you make the process a bit more expedient, here are the six quickest ways to move into a leadership position in your career. (more…)

Posted January 19, 2015 by

Really Simple Tips To Help You Increase The Possibility Of Getting A Job After College

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

College is great but there comes a time when you need to start looking for a job. Contrary to what you may believe, the sooner, the better! The problem is that there are many that struggle with getting a job as a college degree is no longer a certainty that you will be hired. You have to prepare early.

Luckily, there are various ways in which you can increase the possibility of getting a job after you finish college. The advice offered below is really easy to remember and can drastically increase the chances of being hired. (more…)

Posted November 14, 2014 by

Horrible Bosses: How to Protect Yourself in the Workplace

Boss shouting at employee

Boss shouting at employee. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As a recent college graduate jumping into the world of work, an already daunting experience can be made worse if your new boss is scarier than Freddy Krueger telling a ghost story.

With your wet behind the ears appearance, shiny briefcase and overenthusiastic grin, it’s easy for a terrifying manager to systematically dragoon you into becoming his or her errand boy.

Suddenly your fancy college degree isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on, as your sinister superior guffaws through a cloud of cigarette smoke and fires off another lewd email to blight your inbox.

This isn’t what you signed up for. (more…)

Posted September 04, 2014 by

Don’t Take That Job Unless You Can BYOD

Businesswoman sending a text message on mobile phone

Businesswoman sending a text message on mobile phone. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Not that long ago, we selected which jobs we wanted to apply for based on the type of work we would be asked to do, the salary, and where the office was located. These days, it’s becoming increasingly common for applicants to prefer jobs based on the employer’s bring your own device, or BYOD policy. (more…)

Posted August 28, 2014 by

Should students work while studying?

Job or education directions on a metal signpost

Job or education directions on a metal signpost. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Should a student get a job and work whilst studying? Here are a few arguments for and a few against. The issue isn’t really a cut and dry, black and white one. For example, a student taking programming courses should certainly get a job if he or she can manage his or her schedule so that no sleep is lost (it is difficult to program when tired). On the other hand, a student taking a medical or veterinary course should definitely not get a job because there is scarcely enough time to get the studying done and fit in some sleep. (more…)