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Posted January 16, 2017 by

How to prevent high turnover

 

Contributing writer Ted Bauer

Turnover is a concern for businesses. While exact loss numbers around employees departing is hard to track, most CFOs agree that it hits the bottom line. There are obviously intangible issues with turnover, too. The remaining employees (a smaller number) have to share the same (or greater) workload, stressing them out. And certain employees are huge knowledge bases or social connectors. Losing them can strip your business of valuable resources well beyond any cost incurred hiring and training the replacement.

On top of all this, there is some belief that Millennials change jobs faster than Boomers. (Statistically, though, average U.S. job tenure is about 4.6 years — and in 1983, it was 3.5 years. So Millennials have actually gotten more loyal to companies.)

How can turnover be prevented, regardless of generation?

Let’s begin with a little science. Paul Zak is a specialist in researching oxytocin (a chemical in your brain). He gave a popular TED Talk in 2001. Oxytocin is one of the biggest drivers of trust-based relationships in humans, and more oxytocin release — which is tied to much greater happiness and less corporate turnover — tends to come from autonomy over work as opposed to increased compensation.

There’s Idea No. 1, then: focus less on compensation as a driver of behavior, and more on providing employees with autonomy over what they can do, i.e. do not micro-manage them at every turn.

The second idea is something called “The Hawthorne Effect.”

Per Wikipedia, the Hawthorne Effect is “when individuals modify or improve an aspect of their behavior in response to being observed.” This all comes from a place called Hawthorne Works (get it?) in Cicero, Illinois and some experiments done with light bulbs. If you make the room more bright — increase the light bulb, in other words — workers end up being more productive. But if you dim the light bulb again, productivity drops back to normal (or below-normal levels).

The modern application of the Hawthorne Effect, then, is that if you’re more responsive to worker needs, those workers will be more productive. Care about employees. Listen to them. Engage with them. Be supportive of them.

Too often, we think we can solve an issue like turnover or low employee morale/engagement with a new software suite. We can solve accounting issues that way, or even business process (BPO) concerns, but engagement and turnover are distinctly people issues. You solve people issues by investing in people, not technology. That’s the big takeaway here.  

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Posted March 27, 2014 by

Part-time employees can be your prizewinning lot: Just bring the best out of them!

Bimal Parmar

Bimal Parmar, VP of Marketing at Celayix Workforce Management Solutions

“Employers are even more reluctant than usual to commit to full-time employees. They like the flexibility.”Harry Holzer

Donning the worker’s hat in your neighborhood store owner to big corporations, the ‘part-time employees’ have supported the service industry for a long time. While many of them have had a tough ride until now, with Obamacare on the horizon a transformation in the way young America works looks possible.

As for the employers, here are a few surefire measures that’ll help you get the best out of your part-time staffer. (more…)

Posted August 15, 2013 by

Hiring Gen Y for Entry Level Jobs? Consider More than Just the Numbers

While employers may come across various studies on Generation Y, the most important thing for them to consider may be what this group has to offer once they’re hired for entry level jobs.  Learn more in the following post.

When, oh when will everyone stop focusing on all the stats and surveys about Millennials and focus on more important things… like, say, how well we’re actually doing our jobs? In yet another entry into the “here are some numbers about GenY!” category, Washington Post columnist Jena McGregor recently studied the results of a

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Posted July 18, 2013 by

Millennials Say ‘You’re Not the Boss of Me!’

Group of young people working as part of a business team

Group of young people working as part of a business team. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The Millennial generation is here.  They feel entitled. They negotiate everything.  And they ‘ll tell you exactly what is on their mind…even if you don’t want to know. Let’s see you make a team, and a profit out of that!

Before we go any further (and before those of you with short attention spans form an opinion and clock out)…let me apologize.  Sort of.

When talking about Millennials I like to warn people not to bucket.  I warn them and then go right ahead and do it. I bucket. It’s easy. It’s convenient. It’s fun. And it makes about as much sense as asking, “What’s your sign?” (more…)