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Posted May 11, 2016 by

How to conduct a successful informational interview

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Interviewing is hard. And stressful – especially for the recent college graduate or entry-level job seeker who has limited experience in an interview setting. To gain more experience, and to expand your professional relationships, consider conducting an informational interview. The purpose of an informational interview is to gather information and meet someone who is in a role or company you aspire to be in. It’s not a job interview – the person conducting the informational interview (you) should be the one asking the questions.

“Informational interviews are a good way to get the answers you need to make career choices,” says Bill Driscoll, the New England District President of Accountemps, a division of Robert Half, and the world’s first and largest specialized staffing service for temporary accounting, finance and bookkeeping professionals. “Asking experienced professionals who have specialized expertise about their role and what it involves can give you real-world insights.”

In fact, 36 percent of chief financial officers (CFOs) polled said these meetings are becoming more common, with nearly one-third (31 percent) receiving informational interview requests at least once a month. Job seekers should take note – 84 percent of executives said when someone impresses them in a meeting, it’s likely they will alert that person to job openings at the company.

Although informational interviews are not intended solely to seek a certain position in a company, it can set you up for consideration of future roles if you make a good impression. It could also lead to referrals to other contacts or job openings.

Informational interview etiquette guidelines

There are some basic etiquette guidelines to follow when requesting an informational interview, says Driscoll:

  • First, narrow down who you would ask for an informational interview. Create a list of companies you would like to work for, identify career paths that would suit your strengths and interests, and consider which industries interest you. Once you’ve identified these key factors, do some online research to choose the correct contact to interview.
  • Email is a good introductory mode of communication. Keep it simple – be concise but friendly. Briefly go over your background, state the reason you are reaching out to them, and request a meeting or phone call. Be sure to include why you want to meet that person in particular.
  • Look to your professional network to make an introduction. Seeing a message from a familiar name may increase your chance of getting a response.
  • LinkedIn can help you identify contacts and send messages. Keep in mind that people don’t necessarily log on to LinkedIn each day or check their messages on the site, so you might not get a quick response.
  • A phone call is another option to reach an informational interview candidate. Be prepared with what you’ll say in case you get a hold of the person or their voicemail.

How to prepare for an informational interview

Research the company and person you are meeting. Informational interviews tend to be short, so use the opportunity to ask the questions you genuinely want answered. Come prepared with your list of questions. Things you might want to ask are:

  • How did you get started in this industry/company/career path?
  • What is a typical day like?
  • What are the most important skills required in this role/industry?
  • How did you get your job?
  • Can you name some industry associations that I should join?
  • What do you like most about your company?

Dress professionally for your informational interview – just like you would for a job interview.

“Remember this is a business meeting and the way you dress can say a lot about you,” says Driscoll.

Go into an informational interview with a clear understanding that this is a chance to learn about a career, industry and company, to expand your professional relationships and to become better prepared for future interviews. Just don’t expect it to always lead to a job or job interview with that company.

“An informational interview is a great way to meet someone who can make hiring decisions, but don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t lead to a job interview,” says Driscoll. “The point is to learn and establish an important business relationship.”

When the informational interview is done, don’t forget to show gratitude. Always mail a handwritten thank-you note after an interview and keep your new contact updated on your job search and career progress.

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Bill Driscoll, Accountemps

Bill Driscoll, New England District President of Accountemps

Bill Driscoll is the New England District President of Accountemps, a division of Robert Half, and is based in the company’s Boston office. Bill oversees professional staffing services for Robert Half’s 23 offices throughout Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island and portions of New York. Bill is considered a local and national expert on recruiting practices, hiring and job search trends, and other workplace issues.

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Posted October 12, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Business Administration / Management

70.6% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Business Administration / Management:
Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Percentage of Business Administration / Management grads in this occupational field
Accountants and Auditors  $41,900 6.6%
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers  $35,900 5.2%
Retail Salespersons  $31,400 4.3%
Customer Service Representatives  $31,100 3.5%
Managers, All Other  $42,000 2.7%
Human Resources Specialists  $35,300 2.7%
Financial Managers  $31,500 2.6%
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products  $38,400 2.6%
Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants  $24,700 2.6%
Sales Representatives, Services, All Other  $45,800 2.0%
Marketing Managers  $44,800 1.9%
Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists  $39,800 1.6%
Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents  $48,300 1.6%
Tellers  $23,700 1.5%
Office Clerks, General  $25,600 1.5%
Emergency Management Directors  $46,100 1.3%
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks  $31,000 1.3%
Personal Financial Advisors  $46,200 1.2%
First-Line Supervisors of Non-Retail Sales Workers  $42,500 1.2%
Cashiers  $24,300 1.2%
Receptionists and Information Clerks  $19,500 1.1%
Food Service Managers  $33,300 1.1%

Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.

Posted October 11, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Accounting Majors

69.4% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Accounting:
Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Percentage of Accounting grads in this occupational field
Accountants and Auditors  $41,600 54.2%
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks  $33,000 2.9%
Financial Managers  $43,400 1.7%
Managers, All Other  $47,500 1.6%
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers  $32,900 1.6%
Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants  $24,000 1.4%
First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers  $30,800 1.3%
Emergency Management Directors  $43,700 1.2%
Credit Counselors  $38,000 1.1%
Tellers  $16,500 1.1%
Tax Preparers  $37,000 1.1%

Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.

Posted February 13, 2015 by

Is Bookkeeping the Dream Career you’ve been Looking for?

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

Accountants are among the few professionals who wear many hats. Consequently, a career in bookkeeping is versatile and offers very many opportunities. The primary role of a bookkeeper is to keep track of a company`s financial spending so that when it comes to preparing the financial accounts, there is an accurate trail of all transactions. Bookkeepers are the lifeline of many businesses; they help the managers keep accurate financial records that are used in decision-making. Bookkeeping is a highly regarded career in the business world; but how do you know if it is your dream job? (more…)