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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 19, 2016 by

Employers benefit from career services offices

As employers focus on best practices in college recruiting, one of the ways they can create a quality candidate experience is to partner with career services offices. These offices serve as resources that can connect recruiters and hiring managers to college students and recent graduates. Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans, shares different ways employers benefit from working with career services offices.

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Orvil Savery, HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans

“Employers can benefit most working with career services offices at colleges or universities by challenging, working with, and lastly, advocating for not the needs of just now but the needs of students and employers five, 10, or 15 years down the road. The future isn’t something we don’t see coming, so simply doing what’s always been done isn’t going to benefit long-term interest. Allowing recruiters and hiring managers more say in what gets built and implemented, all while doing so under the umbrella of a reciprocal, collaborative, and diversified understanding is beneficial to both sides.

Employers benefit from these relationships by having a great pool of applicants, short lead times, heavy brand awareness, needs and wants based programming, and increasing diversity in the workplace.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Orvil Savery is a University of Missouri graduate and lover of all things involving talent management. He serves as a HR Generalist and Diversity Recruiter at Veterans United Home Loans. He is dedicated to nurturing, cultivating, and recruiting an inclusive and diverse workforce in which all employees can deliver results through their own unique skill sets, backgrounds, and perspectives to enhance the lives of our colleagues, clients, and community.

Posted August 11, 2014 by

College Graduates, Ask These 4 Questions Before Sending Out Resumes for Jobs

Before submitting resumes for jobs, college graduates should ask themselves these four questions in the following post.

A job seeker reports applying for over 1,000 jobs in the past 12 months. The results: Zero job offers; zero job interviews. Like many job seekers, this job seeker viewed the millions of job postings on the Internet as the path to employment. The problem: Too many applications done quickly, carelessly and without conviction…

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Posted July 17, 2014 by

One Question Recruiters Wouldn’t Mind You Asking After a Job Interview

Job seekers, once you have finished an interview, be sure to ask one question that recruiters would appreciate.  Find out what it is in the following post.

One of the most common pieces of advice I’ve heard from recruiters and advisers: at the end of an interview, candidates should ask about any concerns or reservations the interviewers might have about hiring them, like this: “After our conversation today, what concerns do you have about my ability to this

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Posted June 11, 2013 by

Disabled Workers Highly Value Telecommuting as a Workplace Benefit

If they are not doing so already, employers may want to consider allowing workers with disabilities the chance to work from home.

Workers with disabilities say telecommuting is a key workplace benefit, with eight out of 10 (81.1%) saying they would like the option to telecommute at least part time, according to a national survey released by Think Beyond the Label, a private-public collaborative that helps businesses and the public workforce system connect to job seekers with disabilities. (more…)

Posted October 03, 2012 by

Benefits of Results Only Work Environment (ROWE)

Amy Kaminski of Compdata SurveysAs economic conditions continue to slowly improve and companies are once again beginning to hire new employees to rebuild their workforce, employers across the country are looking for ways to attract and retain employees without resorting to hefty pay increases or expensive benefit plans. As a result, some employers have found that adopting a results-only work environment (ROWE) may be the key to creating an attractive work environment for employees.

ROWE evaluates employees solely on their output and not the amount of time spent in the office. Employees are free to take as much time off from work as needed as long as their established goals are being met. Employees working under ROWE are not micro-managed and hold greater accountability for the work they are producing. There have been reports of companies who, as a result of adopting ROWE, have experienced increased employee productivity and reduced voluntary turnover. (more…)