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Posted May 09, 2016 by

6 common mistakes grads make when searching for entry-level jobs

First Job word; business man touching on red tab virtual screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

PhuShutter/Shutterstock.com

Recently, research from the Australian government shows how the shift from college education to full-time employment is becoming more challenging. Job prospects for young Australians are decreasing and on the other hand, recent graduates are making key mistakes when searching for entry-level jobs. Open Colleges, one of Australia’s leading online educators, has gathered information from a variety of recruiters to help recent graduates understand their mistakes when applying for entry-level jobs. Avoid these most common mistakes to avoid when searching for entry-level jobs.

1. Negative attitude towards work

Australian government research confirmed young people do not have enough of a positive attitude towards work. Recruiters recommend job seekers be more motivated and demonstrate enthusiasm to potential employers.

According to the study, young people need to be more responsible and reliable concerning their behavior and approach to their jobs. Recruiters suggest working with a business for a while, coming in to shifts, being punctual, and showing respect to colleagues, and customers or clients.

2. Think learning is over after college

Recruiters ask young professionals to be more open to learning when they start their first entry-level jobs. We all need to continue learning during our professional lives to stay updated with industry changes. But when starting a new job, it is especially important to have the right attitude towards learning because everything is new; employees will need to gain knowledge of the working process in their new companies and the different procedures to complete work correctly and in a timely manner. Your first employer is giving you an excellent opportunity to learn and gain valuable experience, so absorb as much as you can.

3. Underestimate the importance of previous work experience

Even though job seekers are applying for their first full-time entry-level jobs, having some related work experience will give them a competitive advantage. This may be some volunteer work done while still in school or some unpaid jobs during the summer. Don’t underestimate this experience; include it on your resume and tell your interviewers about it.

Studies are essential, but having first-hand experience shows employers that you have some practical skills and a better understanding of work responsibilities and professional work life.

4. Failure to make a good first impression

Whoever says his opinion is not influenced by the first impression is lying. In an interview, job seekers only have a few seconds to convince interviewers that they are the right candidates, so along with their studies, work experience, and the right attitude, their presentations during interviews will play an important role in their success in landing their first full-time jobs.

According to the research, recent graduates often dress inappropriately for work and have untidy hair, so recruiters recommend paying special attention to appearance. Not every company’s dress code is the same, so make sure to verify details about the company culture before an interview in order to dress appropriately.

5. Poor job search and application skills

When looking for their first jobs, Australian young professionals are making very common mistakes, according to research. These skills improve with time and practice, but a couple pieces of advice recruiters give are: make sure each application (resume and cover letter) is tailored to the position for which you are applying, and always double check your application’s spelling and grammar. Recruiters see these types of mistakes as a lack of attention to detail and unacceptable in today’s marketplace.

Recruiters also suggest job seekers approach employers directly after providing their resumes and personally following up with them.

6. Unrealistic work expectations

When applying for their first entry-level jobs after college, recent graduates need to understand they cannot “start at the top.” They have to make an effort to work their way up through the business.

Another common mistake is to expect high compensation. This will also come with time as employees gain experience and assume more responsibilities. The nature of the work they do may not be exactly what they want initially, but as long as workers are learning and doing something they like, they are on the right path.

Need more tips for your job search? Check out our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food.

Posted April 21, 2016 by

Reviewing job candidates’ social media profiles

Businessperson with social networking sites on digital tablet courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock.com

As college recruiters review job candidates’ social media profiles, they will find things they like and others not so much. These profiles tell recruiters not only whether or not candidates are qualified for specific jobs, but also if they are the right fit for their companies. Brandi Britton, District President of OfficeTeam, shares tips on what recruiters should look for when reviewing candidates’ social media profiles.

– “Many recruiters and HR professionals perform online searches of job candidates’ social media profiles to learn more about them, including their industry involvement.

– It may be a red flag to some recruiters if they can’t find candidates’ LinkedIn profiles or anything else about them online.

– A good gauge of candidates’ online activity is how often they update their profiles and if they post useful advice or comments on articles on LinkedIn and industry forums.

– In certain fields or positions, a greater emphasis is placed on digital activity. For example, many companies today rely on creative professionals to help build their firms’ online image, so they want to see that prospective hires have done the same for themselves.

– Negative comments, especially about former employers or colleagues, can cause recruiters to question a job seeker’s professionalism. There may also be concerns that this job seeker’s improper language/behavior will continue in the workplace.

– Employers may form conclusions about people’s personalities or whether they will fit in with the company’s culture based on online remarks.

– Pictures showing candidates in an unflattering light may also deter recruiters from pursuing candidates.

– Recruiters should look to get a sense of candidates’ capabilities through their online profiles. For example, check for information about candidates’ work history and key accomplishments.

– It may be helpful to check if candidates incorporated key industry terms that describe skills and specialties recruiters are looking for.

– Employers may also look for red flags like inconsistencies made on applicants’ resumes that would deter them from considering candidates.

– Keep in mind that looking up candidates online definitely has some risks. Information on the Internet isn’t always accurate; it’s hard to be sure what recruiters find relates to particular candidates and not others with the same name.”

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process? Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Brandi Britton, District President for OfficeTeam

Brandi Britton, District President for OfficeTeam

Brandi Britton is a District President for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. OfficeTeam has more than 300 locations worldwide and places tens of thousands of highly skilled candidates each year into positions ranging from executive and administrative assistant to receptionist and customer service representative.

Posted September 04, 2015 by

How to create a good impression at the job interview?

young candidate having an interview with his employer

Young candidate having an interview with his employer. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

There are a number of things that play a significant role in passing a job interview; one of them is your impression. Know that your impression can either get you selected or rejected for a job. Therefore, you must create a good impression of yourself on the recruiters. Follow the guide below to know how to create a good impression at the job interview: (more…)

Posted February 24, 2015 by

Eat, Drink, and Stay Professional at Office Events

Sarah Landrum photo

Sarah Landrum

I’m sure you can think of at least one story, involving you or someone else, in which an employee had one too many drinks at a company function and was the subject of a great deal of gossip afterwards.

It can be hard to know whether or not it’s cool to knock one back at a work party, especially if you’re new to that particular business or are fresh out of college, where drinking at social events was the norm. Some work cultures are more laid back than others, and you may feel pressured to have at least one beer or glass of wine at a company event.

This can be a huge problem for some of us who tend to make some not-so-great decisions when we drink. While embarrassing moments make for great stories in college, they can have negative implications on your career. (more…)

Posted January 20, 2015 by

How Bilingualism and Multilingualism Help a Student in Education

Hello in Different Languages

Hello in different languages. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If a student speaks a different language he would perceive in a different world. Many theorist have written in the articles that being a bilingual or multilingual is better than a being a monolingual because to survive with a monolingual is not enough in the competitive world because over 5000 languages are spoken in the world which means that about 25 languages are spoken per state.

Therefore for a communication process between the individuals, the noise is not only a barrier but also the monolingual is also a big hurdle.  According to the David Crystal research in 1997 that two children from every three children will grow up with a bilingualism environment such as in Asia, Europe, etc. anywhere in the world. (more…)

Posted December 05, 2014 by

Use Data to Drive Your Recruiting Decisions

Close-up of a touchscreen with financial data in form of charts and diagrams

Close-up of a touchscreen with financial data in form of charts and diagrams. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You may find this surprising – but 74% of talent acquisition leaders say that their organizations do a poor job of using metrics in their recruiting process.

Why? Some of it is lack of time – but a good portion simply don’t know what numbers are available and what can be done with them.  But sometimes even when you know what numbers you want, you’re charged more money by your ATS or job board “partner” for access to your own numbers.  At College Recruiter, we think that’s wrong.  In fact, we automatically provide detailed reports every month for job postings and every targeted banner ad and targeted email campaign so that our clients know how many candidates saw the ads (branding) and how many of those clicked through to the employer’s web site to apply. (more…)

Posted November 17, 2014 by

How to Effectively Interview with Senior Executives

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement Recruiting

Everyone thrives to have more influence at work. They want to become leaders, do something great with the career they are given and be better liked by those around them. Additionally, power translates into more money.

However, prior to obtaining an executive level position, you’ll notice that it’s imperative that you learn to interview with senior management. Despite the task seeming highly intimidating on the surface, effective C-level interviewing can be executed at any age. (more…)

Posted October 24, 2014 by

5 Ways to be More Successful Starting Today

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement Recruiting

For the majority of individuals, success is very much a possibility. However, successful people get to where they are because of a conscious choice to act and behave in ways that promote a healthy career.

Below, our headhunters have defined 5 ways that successful people operate. By knowing their methods and mindset, you are able to immediately begin a journey that, ultimately will lead to a more lucrative, fulfilling job. (more…)

Posted August 13, 2014 by

4 Steps to Building and Defining Your Personal Branding

Personal branding on a torn piece of paper

Personal branding on a torn piece of paper. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Personal branding is your reputation. It is the name you build for yourself. And please know—you do have a brand. Whatever you have done consistently over time has become your brand. Or you may have met people only once, and they now see you as being a certain way. They branded you, and you may not have realized it.

Personal branding is how you differentiate yourself. It is the emotional response that others feel when your name is mentioned. A response that comes from the value that you bring and the way you leverage that value. Personal branding happens whether you like it or not. (more…)

Posted July 02, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Not Feeling the Love on Your Entry Level Jobs? How You Can Survive

For young professionals working hard on their entry level jobs and not feeling appreciated, the following post has some survival tips for the workplace.

Have you ever felt like you were being taken advantage of at work? Well, welcome to corporate America. Unless you work at a notoriously employee-friendly company such as Google or Zappos, you need to accept that the company you work for may be more interested in the bottom line than your happiness. In an ideal

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