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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 10, 2018 by

Attract students and grads with your wellness program, especially financial wellness

 

Wellness programs don’t just reduce costs by increasing the likelihood that your employees show up for work. A holistic and well managed wellness program can also serve as a recruitment tool.

We know healthy employees who balance their work and personal lives are more productive. We know that poor physical, emotional and financial health distract employees while they are working and take them away from work to deal with personal issues. Employers have the opportunity to not only increase productivity but also attract talent by providing holistic wellness services. One important element to attract and support younger talent is a robust financial wellness program. Here we compile the expertise of several experts in wellness programs to help you sort out what will benefit your organization.  (more…)

Posted February 24, 2016 by

Senior year job search: A timeline

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, guest writer

All of a sudden students are part way through their senior year of college, and employment (or unemployment) is just a few short months away. Students who wait to look for jobs until college is over will generally find they are unemployed or working at a part-time job they don’t like for the entire summer.

Of course, lucky students will have secured positions by the fall, but many will need to search for much longer than that. No two students will have the exact same experience. Employment opportunities vary depending on the field, time of year, and flexibility of the job seeker. Recent graduates who are willing to relocate or consider full-time internships, for example, may have more opportunities than people looking for full-time paid employment in their current city only. To avoid post grad unemployment, it’s good for students to start their job search while they are still in college.

1) First semester senior year

During the first semester of senior year, students are not likely to receive a full-time job offer. Although there are a few high demand fields, most students will be doing preliminary research at this point. Students are encouraged to begin networking with people in their chosen career fields if they haven’t already done so. They can also start investigating which companies hire new graduates and find out if recruiters will be on campus during the year. Additionally, the first semester is a good time to meet with professors or professionals within the field to get information about possible opportunities in the future. Although most companies are not going to give an official interview at this point, they may offer an informational interview. A familiar face is more likely to be hired later on.

2) Beginning of second semester senior year

Once students get to their second semester of their senior year, they can start legitimately looking for jobs. Many companies hiring new graduates will begin their recruitment process at this point knowing their employees can’t start until the beginning of summer. One of the most challenging issues for students at this point is finding a balance between school and the job search. It’s important students devote their full attention to study the week before midterms and finals but still manage to send out applications and meet with recruiters.

Woman filling out application during job search courtesy of Shutterstock.com

pixelheadphoto/Shutterstock.com

3) End of second semester senior year

By the end of the second semester, it’s important students are sending out completed job applications on a regular basis. There is not a magic number but one to two applications per week will serve as a good, minimum goal. In addition to applying for jobs the traditional way, students should be actively networking and refining their resumes. Also, it’s important to tailor each cover letter to a specific position. The human resources department can easily tell who made the effort to read the entire job description and who wrote a standard letter.

4) The summer after graduation

The majority of college seniors will not have secured full-time employment by their graduation date. However, this is when it’s important to stay motivated and get creative. In addition to continuing a full-time job search in a specific field, recent grads should look at viable part-time positions, paid internships, and transition jobs that can help them build their resumes. There are several companies that won’t hire somebody until they have a couple years of experience, so that dream job may be just around the corner. In order to beef up their resumes, recent grads can be creative and have two part-time jobs or look into the possibility of something near their field, if not directly in it.

Looking for more advice on the job search? Go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Robyn Scott, a guest writer for College Recruiter, is a private tutor with TutorNerds LLC. She has a BA from the University of California, Irvine, and a MA from the University of Southampton, UK.

Posted February 13, 2016 by

Balancing academics and work as a college student

Photo of Anthony Taylor

Anthony Taylor, guest writer

Students go off to college, but it’s not the rosy life they see in the movies. There are bills to pay, tuition to afford, books to buy, and honestly, balancing finances at a young age is hard. Studying in college and concentrating on getting good grades is tough enough without throwing in a job into the mix. But the money has to flow in to either support the family or to support getting an education. Whatever the reason, here are a few tips to help college students juggle their working and studying lives.

1. Find a job with flexible hours: Let’s face it; students are in college now. There will be coursework and assignments with tight deadlines, and studying should always be a priority. An education will serve as the building blocks for the future so students shouldn’t push it in the backburner. They should find jobs where they can easily accommodate their studies, too, so neither one suffers. These jobs could be within the college campus, as those kinds of jobs understand the balance between work and study, and they can help college students manage their homework.

2. Manage time wisely: With so much on the line, it is wise to have a good time management schedule. College students should know where they spend their time. Many successful people plan nearly each moment of their day to get the most out of their 24 hours. Many times we end up wasting time and not realizing it when we could be putting it to good use. Use lunch breaks to catch up on math homework, or grab a few hours of work during a long lunch break in college. Those few hours can add up during the week. Students need to keep checking in to see if they’re on track per their schedules to know they’re not overcommitting themselves or falling short of their goals. If students know they function better in the mornings, they should get evening jobs so they can do coursework or assignments when they’re fresh and vice versa.

3. Have family support: This goes without saying; without a support system, college students will find it very hard to adjust both lives alone. Students should inform their managers at work, friends, or family to support them in this decision, and help them both personally and professionally. This kind of support will help students infinitely when they feel the pressure is too much, or they need help with managing homework.

4. Know what they want: College students should choose jobs wisely if they can. Students should think about how what they do now could benefit them in the future. Remember, everything can be added to their portfolios. If working in a store, think of inventory – managing time and stock. All of this could and should be interpreted as work experience, and this could boost entry into the working world by gaining experience, references, professional growth, and of course, the money.

5. Be creative in getting homework done: By having a job, college students are effectively cutting down on their study hours. Students must be smart about juggling their time, and try listening to lectures while working. They should also keep their managers in the loop so they get that support system. This way, students can learn, revise, and perhaps even do homework during work hours, which don’t require much brain activity like sorting mail, etc.

6. Take a mental break: It is important to have some time out from studies. Always having studies/ homework on the mind will stress students out, especially if they know they can’t do it during work hours. Allow a study free zone while at work. Know there is nothing students can do about it, so they should give themselves permission to relax. Many times we block ourselves, and take on more stress over things we cannot control. Those moments students are not thinking about studies could benefit them in the long run. This way, they can approach their assignments with a fresh mind.

Smiling college students holding hands at graduation courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

7. Stay focused on the end goal: The end goal should be graduating. Many times, once students start working, they find it hard to stay focused on education. It becomes easy to forget about studies and think about short term benefits, such as getting paid. This spending power lets many people forget about graduating. College students must find ways to motivate themselves. Keep pictures of graduates at their ceremonies or photos of people who managed to reach the pinnacle of their careers to have an aim and a goal to reach.

8. Research on future courses: Students should find courses relevant to them and their future interests. Don’t choose a random course because friends are taking it, or because somebody else has a strong opinion about it. Students need to discover what they are passionate about and what they see themselves doing in the future. Doing some research on courses will help them achieve their future goals.

9. Be smart financially: Money can flow through college students’ fingers like water if they’re not careful. Keep track on spending and where the money has to be allocated. If there are bills to pay, keep that money aside, or pay off debts before doing anything else. This helps students become more financially independent. This not involves their weekly paycheck, but also their tuition. Most colleges have hefty fees so be sure to enroll in a program where there are future benefits. Don’t get a job and go into debt due to careless spending, as this will cause a downward spiral.

10. Be passionate: Happiness can only come from within. College students should be passionate about the courses they will be taking; passion will get them through tough times. If students truly do something they love, they will excel in it. Be happy at the workplace. Find a job that is mentally stimulating or has a good work team. This makes a huge difference in students’ mental health and happiness, and when they’re young and balancing their work and study lives, this is very important.

The balance for managing studies and work can be a fine line, and one that should be carefully monitored so college students don’t end up suffering by their decision to work. This has become a recent trend, as many young students have bills to pay, and this enables them to gain work experience while also getting homework help and inspiration from their coworkers or family.

Need more tips for college students, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Anthony Taylor is a writer, student and editor on student’s writing website. He loves reading, writing motivational stories and spending the time with his family. You can follow him on Twitter and Google+ for more interesting stories.

Posted February 13, 2015 by

Is Bookkeeping the Dream Career you’ve been Looking for?

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

Accountants are among the few professionals who wear many hats. Consequently, a career in bookkeeping is versatile and offers very many opportunities. The primary role of a bookkeeper is to keep track of a company`s financial spending so that when it comes to preparing the financial accounts, there is an accurate trail of all transactions. Bookkeepers are the lifeline of many businesses; they help the managers keep accurate financial records that are used in decision-making. Bookkeeping is a highly regarded career in the business world; but how do you know if it is your dream job? (more…)

Posted February 03, 2015 by

Sage Advice To Help Navigate the Next Steps

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

The interview was about Twitter and tips for engagement and building that online profile that can help to land the next job, especially fresh out of college. But, this interview turned into something more than just advice on how to use one of the most popular social platforms and ended up being advice about life in general.

We took a trip down a philosophical path of chatting about what is important to humans and what makes us tick. The realization that no matter how much academia we may pile on top of ourselves, we still are basically the same as those who have travelled this path before us. We desire to achieve. We desire to be successful. We desire to utilize our skills and what we have learned. But, we also desire to be loved, and even more than that, to be validated for who we are. (more…)

Posted October 08, 2014 by

5 Tips for Creating an Outline: Make Writing Easier, Even When You’re Short on Time

Rear view of a young man working of a computer

Rear view of a young man working of a computer. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Maybe you were assigned a paper at the last minute. Maybe you procrastinated. Maybe some emergency happened during the time that you had planned to spend working on your paper. However you got to this point, the reality is that you need to write a good paper in a short amount of time. How do you avoid panic and get done what you need to get done? Use these five tips to guide you to completing your paper. (more…)

Posted May 16, 2014 by

Want Employees to be More Productive on Their Entry Level Jobs? 4 Ways to Get Them Happy and Healthy

In general as people, we tend to accomplish more when we feel good about ourselves.  The same goes for the workplace.  In the following post, learn four ways to help employees feel happy and healthy on their entry level jobs.

Balance: we all need it. But some workplaces struggle to find this balance, leaving hardworking employees feeling worn out and unproductive. A movement for corporate wellness has begun with policies designed to promote wellness in the workplace and increase employee efficiency. At SweatGuru, we take specific steps to ensure our office environment

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Posted March 31, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Don’t Allow Your Credit to Hinder Your Job Search

As an internship finder, you have the opportunity to gain work experience in a particular field that can benefit your job search.  However, if you have bad credit it might affect your ability to land a job.  Learn how to improve your credit in the following post so that it does not hinder your job search.

Featured: Not Featured This is a post by Anna Hicks. It’s a catch-22: to take on an unpaid internship, you often have to go into debt or rack up money on your credit cards. However, if you don’t manage your credit properly, you could prevent yourself from turning that internship into a full

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Posted March 25, 2014 by

Want to Write Cover Letters for Recent College Graduate Jobs that Show Passion and Professionalism? Tips that Can Help

When writing cover letters for recent college graduate jobs, it is possible to show your passion, yet maintain a professional tone.  In the following post, learn some tips that can help you achieve this goal.

Featured: Featured You have a dream job or a dream internship – somewhere you’ve wanted to work forever OR somewhere you just stumbled upon but have convinced yourself is the PERFECT opportunity for you. How do you write a cover letter that expresses your passion for the opportunity but stays professional in tone? read more

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Posted February 26, 2014 by

The 5 Stages of Job Hunting Grief – And How to Cope with Them

Woman crying at work after being dismissed

Woman crying at work after being dismissed. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You’ve undoubtedly heard of the five stages of grieving the loss of a loved one – denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. These were defined by Elizabeth Kübler-Ross way back in 1969, and quickly became a universally accepted model for how people deal with death. You may have even seen people apply these stages to other kinds of loss, such as job loss. But there’s another kind of grief that’s increased in prominence during the Great Recession but hasn’t been as clearly defined: job hunting grief. (more…)