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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 10, 2016 by

Onboarding process can include background check

Recruitment photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Before bringing new hires into their companies, employers might want to give each one a background check. These days, recruiters and hiring managers use social media as a tool to learn more about candidates, so take advantage of it and other helpful resources. After all, companies shouldn’t just hire quality employees but quality people. John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource, explains including a background check as part of its onboarding process.

“I work for OnSource, and we have a network of 15,000 people who conduct photo inspections for claims and underwriting purposes for insurance companies; the inspectors visit consumers and take photos of vehicles and property. The whole process for coming onboard as an inspector can take a few days. We require a background check, and if someone doesn’t have an existing background check, they will need to provide one to OnSource. We review the background check and then bring the applicants on board.”

If you need help developing your onboarding program, College Recruiter can help. Follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

John Cass manages OnSource’s marketing efforts for clients and OnSource’s network development.

John has over 25 years of marketing and digital marketing experience. A pioneer in the content marketing industry, he has been responsible for directing and managing content marketing and social media campaigns. John is the author of Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging, published in 2007, and is a Founding Fellow of the Society for New Communications Research, Past President of the Boston Chapter of the American Marketing Association, and is the Co-Founder of the Boston Agile Marketing Meetup. He has worked at a number of technology brands including SDL and 48hourprint.com, was the Online Community Manager at Forrester Research, and has worked at several interactive and content agencies, including Pace Communications and Portent Interactive.

Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

Bad job interview - concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Eviled/Shutterstock.com

Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted March 30, 2016 by

Narrowing your candidate pool

When recruiting college students and recent grads, it’s important to narrow your candidate pool as you go through the college recruiting process.

This article and accompanying three videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, feature The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner. The videos are part of a 15-video series featuring The WorkPlace Group experts.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Employers can become overwhelmed by the number of candidates in the candidate pool, depending on the size of the employer and number of internships and entry-level jobs available. The process of narrowing down the pool typically begins with resume review.

Individuals apply in numerous ways: resume books, walk-in applicants, job boards, career fairs, on-campus interviews, etc. Regardless of how candidates apply, resumes must be reviewed. WPG uses a resume checklist which is scientifically constructed. Reviewing resumes objectively allows employers to make clear inferences about candidates’ qualifications.

In high volume situation, particularly for employers with large college recruiting programs, WPG recommends using a web screen to narrow the candidate pool. The web screen allows employers to quickly qualify or disqualify candidates. Next, employers conduct either a phone screen or video-based interviews. This step helps the recruiters get to know the candidates on a deeper level.

After conducting these screening steps, the employer would interview the candidate face-to-face: either an OCI (on-campus interview) or an interview on site at the employer location. This would help the employer to decide whether to hire or not hire the individual and to decide whether to conduct background checks, drug screenings, and other necessary paperwork.


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The qualities employers should be looking for when recruiting candidates can vary depending on the organization and the job function/position. The WorkPlace Group develops an ideal candidate profile featuring the requirements for the position and nice-to-haves when working with employers. Employers should also consider what learning objectives they want to set for each position—what do they want student interns to learn? By working through this process before interviewing candidates, employers can eliminate the problem of hiring the wrong candidates for positions.

The last video offers specific tips for narrowing the candidate pool.


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1) Focus on soft skills in interviews, not technical competencies, when interviewing interns and recent grads. Employers must remember that students are students, not polished professionals.

2) Use situational questions, not behavioral interview questions. Ask “can do, not have done” type questions. Students won’t necessarily be able to draw upon past experience when answering interview questions, but they can explain what they might do hypothetically. They can demonstrate problem solving skills when answering situational questions.

3) When hiring for technical roles, focus assessment at the right level. You can’t expect new grads to be experts in technical areas; you can expect them to have an appropriate level of skill based on their education and level of experience, though. Talk to them about their projects in particular classes to gain insight into their studies.

Always be as rigorous and scientific as possible in the interview process.

 

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted March 30, 2015 by

Four Common Myths Employers Face Before Hiring New Employees

Michael Klazema

Michael Klazema

Description: From misconceptions about how background checks are actually run to misplaced trust in resume-padding job applicants, here are four of the most common myths employers must accept about the hiring process.

Perhaps you just started a new business and are looking to run your first run of hiring, or maybe you have just been promoted to a position that requires you to interview applicants and give out job offers. Either way, you are probably bringing more than a few hiring process misconceptions to the table.

From asking interview questions to deciding which resume items do or do not make a person qualified for a position, all the way to the pre-employment background check, the hiring process is fraught with pitfalls and myths that you will need to toss in the trash before you get started. Read on to find out the four most common myths employers face before hiring new employees. (more…)

Posted March 30, 2015 by

Why You Should Clean Up Your Social Media Profiles – and How to Do It.

Lisa Green photo

Lisa Green

The growth of social media has turned our focus online and made digital friendships, statuses and profiles just as valid as ones that exist in “real life.” Though there are countless advantages to a fleshed-out online presence, there are also real and unfortunate downsides, particularly to those who are on the hunt for a new career. (more…)

Posted March 09, 2015 by

Hiring for National Security Agencies

On December 8, 2014, human resource leaders from federal, state, and local government agencies came together at the offices of the U.S. General Services Administration for a day of intense learning about how your agency can more efficiently and effectively recruit recent college grads and students.

The College Recruiting Bootcamp event was organized by College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates searching for entry-level jobs and students hunting for internships.

In this video, Todd Rosenblum, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Department of Defense, delivers his presentation on, “Hiring for National Security Agencies.” To download the PowerPoint for the presentation, click here. (more…)

Posted November 21, 2014 by

Finding a job after substance use in college

Alcohol abuse: drunk young man or student lying down on a table with beer bock still in hand, focus on glass up front.

Alcohol abuse: drunk young man or student lying down on a table with beer bock still in hand, focus on glass up front. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

College was one of the most memorable and defining experiences of your entire life. Now that you’ve recently entered the “real world”, you’re allowed to be a little sad and anxious. From sparse job openings to the culture shock of re-entering a world full of rules, there are plenty of roadblocks you’ll have to overcome. And if you have a substance use history, you may feel you have to work even harder to secure work after graduating. (more…)

Posted September 08, 2014 by

College Graduates, Have You Thought about Lying on Your Resumes to Get Jobs?

Even though they might think they can get away with it, college graduates should not lie on their resumes to get jobs, or else they might get caught and cost themselves employment.  In the following post, learn more about lying on resumes from an infographic.

Most employees have lied on a resume at one point or another. In fact, up to 78% of applicants admit to submitting “misleading” resumes. And 84% of recruiters and hiring managers state they have come across fabricated facts on resumes. So what’s the harm? Everybody does it. And when the job market is

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Posted August 28, 2014 by

Recruiters, Trying to Find the Best Candidates for a Small Business? 7 Tips to Attract Them

Recruiters who are looking to hire the best candidates for a small business can get seven tips to help attract them in the following post.

Finding and hiring the right people is easier said than done, but it’s an important part of owning a small business. Training and processing new employees is expensive, so managing turnover and improving employee retention is an excellent way to keep tabs on your bottom line. Here are seven strategies you can employ to make

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Posted August 20, 2014 by

Interviewing for Jobs, Recent College Graduates? Don’t Ask These 10 Questions

Recent college graduates interviewing for jobs should not ask these 10 questions found in the following post.

You’ve spent the last 45 minutes sitting in a job interview; the hiring manager is about to wrap up. And right then, the hiring manager asks: “Do you have any questions for me?” You were prepared. But you lock up! In an effort to think on your feet, you blurt out, “How much does this

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