ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 05, 2018 by

Salary disclosure and the new climate: Tips for recruiters to make informed hiring decisions

 

Wages for women and minorities still lag behind their White male counterparts. Consequently, equal pay regulations have gained traction quickly in the last few years. The intent of the legislation, focused around salary disclosure, is to close the stubborn pay gap. Recruiters may be losing one tool in their toolbox but they can still perform their jobs well. 

Last year, eight states, cities, or localities made it illegal for employers to ask for salary history. At the end of 2017, more than a dozen pay equity laws were under review. Many HR experts anticipate this trend will continue. To get ahead of the curve, your HR team should review your strategy. (more…)

Posted June 10, 2016 by

Onboarding process can include background check

Recruitment photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Before bringing new hires into their companies, employers might want to give each one a background check. These days, recruiters and hiring managers use social media as a tool to learn more about candidates, so take advantage of it and other helpful resources. After all, companies shouldn’t just hire quality employees but quality people. John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource, explains including a background check as part of its onboarding process.

“I work for OnSource, and we have a network of 15,000 people who conduct photo inspections for claims and underwriting purposes for insurance companies; the inspectors visit consumers and take photos of vehicles and property. The whole process for coming onboard as an inspector can take a few days. We require a background check, and if someone doesn’t have an existing background check, they will need to provide one to OnSource. We review the background check and then bring the applicants on board.”

If you need help developing your onboarding program, College Recruiter can help. Follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

John Cass, Director of Marketing at OnSource

John Cass manages OnSource’s marketing efforts for clients and OnSource’s network development.

John has over 25 years of marketing and digital marketing experience. A pioneer in the content marketing industry, he has been responsible for directing and managing content marketing and social media campaigns. John is the author of Strategies and Tools for Corporate Blogging, published in 2007, and is a Founding Fellow of the Society for New Communications Research, Past President of the Boston Chapter of the American Marketing Association, and is the Co-Founder of the Boston Agile Marketing Meetup. He has worked at a number of technology brands including SDL and 48hourprint.com, was the Online Community Manager at Forrester Research, and has worked at several interactive and content agencies, including Pace Communications and Portent Interactive.

Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

Bad job interview - concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Eviled/Shutterstock.com

Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted February 10, 2015 by

Making the Right Impression on Your First Job Interview

Job interview

Job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

In its simplest of terms, an interview is a conversation between a potential employee and a prospective employer. In today’s modern age, getting to the interview is a huge achievement. As there are thousands of candidates who apply for a single job, getting an opportunity of an interview is something that the candidates should really feel thankful for and also take it seriously. Many people, when they get the interview call usually end up taking it very casually and then missing their chance to get a very decent job by throwing it in a waste of over- confidence. (more…)

Posted September 23, 2014 by

Can I Get Hired with a Criminal Record?

Michael Klazema

Michael Klazema

One of the first questions that people with criminal records ask as they head out into the job market in search of employment is about whether or not their search is even worth it. It’s a valid query: for years, employers have blacklisted ex-convicts and even misdemeanor criminals simply for having criminal offenses on record. Even if you have served your time for a crime and are working hard to rebuild your life, a criminal record can follow you around for your whole life and force you to keep paying for your mistakes. Quite simply, most employers aren’t willing to take a risk on people with criminal history, whether because they are worried for their safety (or the safety of their customers or workers) or because they just look down upon those who have committed crimes in the past.

Still, getting hired with a criminal record is possible if you know which steps to take and how to conduct yourself throughout the interview process. Follow the steps below to take control over your life and get yourself back to a respectable position of employment. (more…)

Posted July 11, 2014 by

College Graduates, How Social Media Can Provide Proof in Your Search for Jobs

As college graduates search for jobs using social media, they should understand how these sites can provide proof to employers of them as ideal job candidates.  Learn more in the following post.

Are you as passionate as your resume says about your profession or craft? Are you as positive as you hope and as likeable you’d like? Without knowing you, your digital footprint – your public profiles and online activities as reviewed potential employers – often best demonstrates who you really are. Recruiters refer to this online process as

View post:

Continue Reading

Posted June 25, 2014 by

Franchising for College Grads

A road to franchising new business opportunity chain store

A road to franchising new business opportunity chain store. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

During college, most students feel the optimism of a world that’s completely open to them and that gives the tools and connections they need in order to succeed. However, a small percentage of college grads aren’t going to school to join the corporate world, they’re entrepreneurs and small business owners looking for lucrative opportunities.

These graduates intend on starting their own business, whether it be a restaurant, boutique, service business or any number of others. They’ll quickly find that the theory they learned in business school might not be enough to succeed in the business world. However, there is a solution… (more…)

Posted June 05, 2014 by

4 Tips Employers Can Use in Hiring Candidates for Entry Level Jobs

There are various factors employers might consider when hiring candidates for entry level jobs.  In the following post, learn four tips they can use in decision making.

Congratulations! You’ve already rounded a few hurdles of starting a business — you’ve made the decision it’s something you’re motivated to do and you’ve set the wheels in motion to make it happen. The type of business you’re starting will determine the type of employee you need and their skill set — even whether you need one or more.

Read original article:

Continue Reading

Posted March 03, 2014 by

Don’t Know What to Ask Following Your Interview for an Entry Level Job? 4 Types of Questions that are Necessary

After interviewing for an entry level job, you may be offered the chance to ask some questions.  The following post has four types of questions that are necessary for you to ask as a job seeker.

Every part of the hiring process counts, but a face-to-face interview is the best opportunity to dazzle the boss and land a coveted offer. To maximize those precious moments, here are the four types of interview questions every Millennial should ask an employer. Each one demonstrates critical thinking and declares: I’m in

Excerpt from:

Continue Reading

Posted February 26, 2014 by

Applying to Jobs for Recent College Graduates? Privacy Concerns You Might Have

When applying to jobs for recent college graduates, candidates may be concerned about their privacy.  The following post includes an infographic questioning how much privacy you have during a job search.

With access to information at the touch of a few buttons, social media has had a huge impact on the job search. We can look for jobs, network, research companies and hiring managers… and much more. There’s another side to the coin, however… one many job seekers don’t think about: the extent employers, recruiters and hiring managers will go

Jump to original:

Continue Reading