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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 14, 2019 by

Why including video in your job board postings is crucial if you’re trying to hire students and recent grads

They say that video killed the radio star. At least that’s what The Buggles sang way back in 1980. Could they have actually been singing about the death of text-only job posting ads? Doubtful, but I suppose possible.

So although I doubt that The Buggles were considering job posting ads while writing out the lyrics of that iconic song, I do think that video is killing the text-only job posting ad. Why? There are 86 million members of Gen Z, they’re beginning to enter the workforce, and they rely upon YouTube and other video sites for information far more than their Millennial older siblings and even more so than their Gen X and Baby Boomer parents.

Our friends at Google recently conducted a survey with Qualtrics Research to better understand how 18- to 24-year olds decide who to date. The decision of who to date is not quite the same as who to work for, but there are similarities. Some 41 percent of this age cohort learned about dating apps like Tinder through online video sites like YouTube. Taken alone, that number didn’t surprise me. But it did when I found out that it meant that 57 percent more of this age cohort found out about dating apps using online video sites than did 25- to 34-year-olds.

In addition to using video to learn about dating, Gen Z uses video for just about all kinds of learning. Indeed, 80 percent of teens turn to YouTube as a source of information. Why does this matter to employers? Because a generation that prefers to learn through video is going to be more likely to apply to a job posting from your competitor that includes video instead of your posting that does not.

A few years ago, College Recruiter embarked on what others in the job board industry told us was foolish: to exponentially increase the number of postings on our site with embedded video by offering that feature for free to our employer customers. Today, hundreds of thousands of the postings on CollegeRecruiter.com have video embedded into them, even though most job boards don’t allow employers to embed video. Of the minority of job boards that do offer that feature, most of those are very large and charge employers a fortune. Our strategy to encourage the inclusion of video isn’t unique, but it sure is unusual.

Quite simply, College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career and we’re passionate about the candidate experience. Anything that we can do to help the job seekers using our site find that great career in a way that creates a better experience for them is something that we’re going to want to do. And video fits that description perfectly.

Whether you’re posting a single job for 30-days or using our JobsThatScale product to help you hire dozens or even hundreds, we’re going to want you to embed your YouTube employment video into your posting and we make it really, really easy for you to do that…for free.

Posted January 23, 2017 by

How Millennial managers are different

 

Contributing writer Ted Bauer

When Millennials become managers of others, what can we expect? How do they manage differently?

We’ve been managing in similar ways for generations now (maybe as far back as 1911), but in the last few years, Millennials have overtaken Baby Boomers as America’s largest generation. Right this second, being younger and all, Millennials aren’t running many companies yet. But they are managing: some research says 62% of global workers have had a Millennial boss at least once. 

One important distinction here is that oftentimes, Millennials see themselves as leaders even if the job title doesn’t back that up. That was a key finding in a recent report from The Hartford. Here are a few other trends we see in Millennial managers:

The work-life balance issue: Millennials are known for demanding work-life balance, but when they become managers, they are actually struggling with work-life balanceBeing young, they might feel they have more to prove in a role, and thus feel more pressure or spend more time at work. Other research has backed this up, calling Millennials one of the biggest workaholic generations. If you work for a Millennial who spends 12 hours+ per day at work and you feel the need to match or exceed that, this aspect of Millennial managers could be a con.

Less command and control. More collaboration: This is a big theme of Millennial managers, with the common logic being that they grew up in more group activities — and thus feel comfortable in that setting. This is a very good thing, as one study has shown command and control management styles are literally taking years off people’s lives.  (more…)

Posted January 19, 2017 by

It’s crucial for managers to learn to communicate across generations

 

The first thing one needs to realize once they move to a management role is this:

Your job has changed! Drastically.

Many people happily take on the title of ‘manager’ while assuming that most of what they will do and be responsible for on a day-to-day basis won’t be all that different, says MacKenzie Kyle, a management consultant and author of The Performance Principle: A Practical Guide to Understanding Motivation in the Modern Workplace. Given that there is limited time each day, and that management responsibilities are their own full-time job, this can result in significant personal stress, working excessive hours as the person attempts to do two jobs, and feeling like he or she has to ‘waste’ time on activities like communication and reporting, which doesn’t produce the same immediate and obvious results as ‘production’ work.

But, as a manager, it is now a big part of your daily job to effectively facilitate the flow of information. So don’t expect that as a manager you’ll get to avoid those regular status meetings or email updates; instead, you’ll be the driving force behind them.

“You are moving to a role that includes a significant component of communication,” says Kyle.

And that means communicating with different personalities, styles, and generations. That in itself is another great challenge all new managers must master. Especially for Millennials trying to communicate and report up across generations, specifically with baby boomers.

In fact, reporting challenges between generations in the workplace are an offshoot of the Grand Communication Canyon between Baby Boomers and Millennials, says Chris Butsch, author of The Millennial’s Guide to Making Happiness, a positive psychology book for young people driven by humor, science, and stories from Millennials around the world. So what’s driving these generations apart? Well, they both want something the other isn’t providing.

Millennials want feedback.

“I’m often asked why we seem to need feedback at every turn, and the answer is quite simple: this is the system we’re used to,” says Butsch. “We’re the most educated generation in America’s history; with over 50% of us holding college degrees. That means more than any generation before us, we’ve spent more time in the education system receiving precise feedback on everything. Even in college, which prepares us for work, we received a percentage score on every deliverable: Here’s what you did right, here’s where you screwed up, 89%, B+.”

But baby boomers are industrious and often bottom-line driven, says Butsch. So if you are a new manager communicating with a baby boomer follow these guidelines from Butsch when managing the flow of communication in the workplace:

Imagine this scenario: Yesterday morning, your client asked for something you have no experience in. This afternoon the manager who you report to asks this:

Haven’t heard from XYZ client in a week- how are things going?

BAD REPORT: Yesterday morning they asked for something I don’t know much about, so I’m kinda stuck. Could you help?

This response creates more questions and more work – baby boomers – often senior managers in today’s corporate hierarchy, hate this. Instead, impress them by showing how much work you’ve already done, covering the three bases above:

GOOD REPORT: (1) Things are well and we’re speeding towards go-live by Monday EOD. I’ve completed 5 of the 7 tasks this week. (2) However, they’ve asked for recommendations for ideal CRM software, and (3) while I’ve thoroughly researched the top 4 options (Pipedrive, Salesforce, Insightly, and Zoho), I don’t feel qualified to make a recommendation without experience. Could you connect me with someone who might have experience in this area?

The latter response tells them things are going well, you’re on schedule, and you specify precisely where you need help.

The biggest thing to remember when communicating as a manager, whether it’s with direct reports, or to senior leaders is this, says Butsch: Stop treating everyone the same.

Butsch references a 75-year-long Harvard study that found the No. 1 indicator of life satisfaction is the quality of our relationships. If you build relationships with the people around you, you’re also building trust, likability, and efficiency between you.

“Building a working relationship doesn’t necessarily mean being buddy-buddy with everyone; it means understanding them,” says Butsch.

How can new managers understand the many different personalities and work styles across generations in the workplace? Start by making mental baseball cards, says Butsch. Like this:

Danielle (hospital director)
Likes: directness, short meetings, short emails
Hates: getting lost in details, anyone who’s late

Kyle (scheduling software analyst)
Likes: positive feedback, 1-1 attention, clear walkthroughs
Hates: feeling lost, going too long without feedback

So if communicating with Danielle and Kyle, Butsch would spend an hour walking Kyle through a new workflow, then fire Danielle a 1-sentence email letting her know that the scheduling software is on track.

As you build these relationships, and start to understand each person’s own unique style – and quirks – you’ll simply enjoy working with more people, and will also build trust with them, meaning you’ll feel more comfortable asking for favors or support in times of need, adds Butsch.

The reality of the job of manager is often different than expectations, and a large number of people don’t find the activities of being a manager – all the communication, supporting other people to do the actual work while dealing with many of their problems, rewarding, says Kyle. But the manager’s role is to coordinate and support the production work (not to do it) and this requires significant time spent simply communicating with the members of the team. Learning how to communicate successfully with different personalities and across generations is a big factor in one’s success as a manager.

Are you ready to make that change? Then you’re ready to succeed as a first-time manager.

Want more management tips and career advice? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted October 14, 2016 by

Spotlight on Success: Engaging entry-level hires at GSE [video]

 

No doubt you’re familiar with the job-hopping trend that millennials are known for. How do you increase your retention of entry-level hires? Wendy Stoner, Director for the Office of Emerging Talent Development at GSA, knows how. She leads a Leadership Development program to engage entry-level hires. She calls the two-week on-boarding Career 101. “millennials like to be part of a cohort,” she says. “They don’t like to be on their own,” so the new employees work together along two training tacks.

They receive technical training to prepare them for the functions of their jobs. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, they learn soft skills like professional communication, presentation and negotiation skills, and how to have a critical conversation in the workplace. They watch videos and practice role play to prepare them for working with people whose backgrounds and working style differ from their own. Also, GSA delivers the Myers-Briggs personality indicator to explain why coworkers’ behaviors may differ, and how to work with them.

Generational differences? You don’t say.

The Careerstone Group designed GSA’s training in response to the inter-generational issues we all hear about. You know some of the complaints. Baby Boomers complain about millennials’ informal communication (they write emails like text messages, Boomers say). And millennials complain about Baby Boomers’ work ethic (keeping long hours doesn’t mean you’re more productive, millennials say). During their Career 101, new GSA employees learn to articulate what these generational differences are, and understand the different values that cause differences in behavior.

Don’t stop at onboarding.

Stoner says GSA invests in engagement beyond the first two weeks. They put their entry-level hires on a two-year rotational track that exposes them to different areas of their field. For example, a new hire in finance may rotate to learn about formulating budgets, executing them, strategic planning and more. Not only does this prepare them for a variety of possible jobs, but it clearly demonstrates that they care about employees’ development. GSA wants employees to discover what job appeals to them most. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do when I was that age,” Stoner remarks, so it is only fair to facilitate employees’ learning for a couple years.

Nothing counts without an open culture

Formal training can transfer plenty of knowledge, but without an open company culture that embraces all employees, that training can fall flat. Stoner says, “Your culture needs to be open to listening to them and hearing their ideas.” She says GSA recognizes that good ideas can come from anyone, regardless of where they sit on the org chart. Their investment and openness pay off. GSA retains 93% of entry-level hires during their first two years–pretty impressive for the new job-hopping norm. Engaging millennials doesn’t have to be hard. Stoner says, “We want them know they are coming into a company that does value their development. millennials are eager, knowing that a company will make an investment in them.”

wendy-stonerWendy Stoner will be a panelist at this December’s College Recruiting Bootcamp. She serves as GSA’s Director for the Office of Emerging Talent Development within the Office of Human Resources Management. She strives to create an environment of highly engaged employees dedicated to accomplishing GSA’s mission and has successfully recruited hundreds of highly talented recent graduates prepared to tackle GSA’s business challenges. Stoner’s work is helping GSA fuel the pipeline to meet the agency’s future leadership and succession planning needs. Connect with Wendy on LinkedIn.

Posted February 22, 2016 by

Recruiting and training HVACR technicians

An HVAC technician searching for a refrigerant leak on an evaporator coil courtesy of Shutterstock.com

David Spates/Shutterstock.com

Attracting HVACR (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration) technicians and instructors has been challenging for recruiters and hiring managers. There is an opportunity to get college students and recent graduates interested in HVACR jobs if their recruitment and training efforts are strong.

The next generation of Americans, Generation Z students, are about to enter the workforce, and many Gen Z students are unaware of the opportunities available in the HVACR career field.

The oldest of Gen Z students are to complete high school. Some will enter the military or the workforce, and most will attend a one, two, or four-year college or university. The oldest of Gen Z was about 10 years old at the height of the Great Recession and spent most of their formative years witnessing and, in many cases, suffering from the financial turmoil. As compared to their Gen X parents at the same age, Gen Z’ers are far more likely to favor career paths with low student loan debt, opportunities for advancement within their organizations, work/life balance, and a good, stable, living wage.

Trades such as HVACR provide all of those benefits, but few young adults are aware of that fact. More than anything else, the industry needs better marketing of its career opportunities. It should make a concerted effort to deliver presentations in the nation’s high schools, just as the military and some other professions do.

“One option for HVACR industry leaders is to live stream informational presentations on YouTube to build a massive and therefore search engine friendly repository of these presentations and have the presentations delivered by recent graduates of those schools. Graduates can share their stories including their challenges. Authenticity and peer-to-peer communication matters greatly to young adults. A message that everything is great or a great message delivered by a Baby Boomer will not resonate,” notes College Recruiter’s President and Founder, Steven Rothberg.

Another way to recruit HVACR technicians and instructors is to have the employers work with educators on developing strategies to qualified students. They can also collaborate on encouraging these students to enroll in training programs, which will create a workforce in waiting. In order to train more technicians and instructors, one option is establishing financial support through local and regional employers in the career field to create training programs.

College students and recent grads can be potential candidates for jobs as HVACR technicians and instructors. However, there must be a more proactive approach when it comes to recruiting and training.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

Posted June 25, 2015 by

The Millennial Makeover: Why This Group Matters in the Workplace

Hello I'm a Millennial words on a nametag or sticker to illustrate a young person in the demographic group interested in mobile technology, texting and social networking

Hello I’m a Millennial words on a nametag or sticker to illustrate a young person in the demographic group interested in mobile technology, texting and social networking. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

When it comes to today’s workforce, there is no doubt that millennials are creating an atmosphere of change in the workplace.  So, who are millennials?  This group was born between 1980 and the year 2000, and reflect a generation with their own career goals, attitudes, and oh yes, their understanding of how to use technology.  For employers to take their companies to the next level, they will need to find ways to recruit and retain millennials, also known as Generation Y. (more…)

Posted June 17, 2015 by

Data Scientist, Social Media Manager, Civil Engineer, Computer Systems Analyst and Physical Therapist Among Most Promising Careers for Millennials

The Millennial generation – the largest generation in the workforce — has been tagged with negative workplace stereotypes that they’re narcissistic, obstinate and lacking initiative. Yet smart companies know that unless they start hiring these young employees soon, their future is bleak.

Steven-Rothberg-high-res-close-08-13-2013That realization shows in suddenly robust hiring of Millennials. “This is the strongest year of employment growth for this generation since 2007,” says Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter.

“We’re getting close to where we’re seeing equilibrium,” Rothberg adds. “Where just about every college educated young adult that wants to be employed, can easily be employed.” (more…)

Posted December 05, 2014 by

Questions and Myths Regarding Your Nursing Career

Brian Short

Brian Short, Founder and CEO of allnurses.com

Whether you are a nursing student or a new grad, you probably have many questions surrounding your future as a nurse. Let’s look at a few of the more common questions and myths that keep coming up.

Why do I keep reading about a nursing shortage when I know nurses are having trouble finding jobs?

There has been talk of a nursing shortage for years, but it hasn’t fully kicked in – yet. That’s partly because many baby boomer nurses – group that comprises the largest segment of the nursing population – have delayed their retirement for a variety of reasons. As they continue to age and shift out of the workforce, the nursing shortage will become more apparent. (more…)

Posted October 20, 2014 by

The Rise of the Skilled Trades Career

Many are learning that having job-skills training is just as important as having a college degree. Employers look for those who can jump on board, hit the ground running, and do the job properly from day one. Successful employees may have training in necessary skills to perform job tasks, before they are hired. The U.S. economy now shows a recovery from the worst conditions of unemployment in decades. (more…)
Posted July 29, 2014 by

Attention Millennials – This is Not Your Parents’ World

Young relaxed successful businessman in the city

Young relaxed successful businessman in the city. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Much has been said about the generation known as the “Millennials.”  Baby Boomers see them as lacking in commitment, reflective of instability in lifestyles, and not focused enough on career, family, and long-term goals.  Many even call them the “Lost Generation,” a reference perhaps to the “Lost Boys” of Peter Pan.  But take heart, you Millennials – this is not the world of your parents nor will it ever be again.  You are a generation that is coming into its own and adjusting to a very different global mindset.  As members of this generation, you have a much better handle on how your world will “work” during your lifetime and how best to navigate it.  Consider the following: (more…)