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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

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Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

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Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted March 30, 2015 by

Four Common Myths Employers Face Before Hiring New Employees

Michael Klazema

Michael Klazema

Description: From misconceptions about how background checks are actually run to misplaced trust in resume-padding job applicants, here are four of the most common myths employers must accept about the hiring process.

Perhaps you just started a new business and are looking to run your first run of hiring, or maybe you have just been promoted to a position that requires you to interview applicants and give out job offers. Either way, you are probably bringing more than a few hiring process misconceptions to the table.

From asking interview questions to deciding which resume items do or do not make a person qualified for a position, all the way to the pre-employment background check, the hiring process is fraught with pitfalls and myths that you will need to toss in the trash before you get started. Read on to find out the four most common myths employers face before hiring new employees. (more…)

Posted January 16, 2015 by

Autobiographies Every College Applicant Should Read

Illustration depicting a book with a life story concept title. White background.

Illustration depicting a book with a life story concept title. White background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Writing about oneself in a personal statement can be incredibly challenging. We are taught from a young age to underplay our achievements, affect modesty when we have excelled and not to boast about good grades or awards. Then, all of a sudden, in order to gain entry to college or secure a great job, we must do a quick about-turn, and talk ourselves up to get the admissions board salivating over our application! Along with the usual tips and tricks, it can be valuable to get in the right mindset for your application and remind yourself of the many reasons you’re passionate about your chosen topic. What better way to get motivated than to read about the accomplishments of some of the most inspiring minds of our time? (more…)

Posted December 16, 2014 by

Entry Level Students: Ways to Boost Your Job Prospects even With No Experience

Cheerful young volunteers with garbage bag after cleaning the streets

Cheerful young volunteers with garbage bag after cleaning the streets. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

For anyone approaching college graduation looking to step straight into the world of work, it’s surely about time you began an active job search. However, as many of you begin writing your first resume, you may start to feel that a lack of professional experience is going to jeopardize your chances of landing an interview.

Job-hunting with minimal experience has always been difficult, regardless of the economic climate, and with record levels of graduates entering the American job market, your concerns are well founded. However, it’s not all bad news. The growth of websites like LinkedIn now offer new ways in which you can network within a specific industry, and a plethora of job board websites also help open the door to more job openings than ever before. If you prepare well and do the right things early on, it’s quite possible to land a really great job fresh out of college. However, this preparation means taking immediate action to gain the experience you need, along with writing an inspirational resume that a fairly represents your potential as an applicant. (more…)

Posted September 05, 2014 by

Recruiters, Here’s a New Resource to Help You Find the Best Job Candidates

For recruiters trying to find the best candidates for job openings, the following post shares a new resource they might be interested in.

In many ways, recruiting is a lot like dating. So in the arduous process of finding the perfect match, what works for one might work for the other, right? That’s what Jobr thinks: This new job search app is taking its cue directly from the online dating world. Matching employees and jobs On the surface, Jobr

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Posted August 26, 2014 by

Recent Graduate, Writing Resumes for Jobs? Understand These 7 Things Concerning Applicant Tracking Systems a.k.a. ATS

If you are a recent graduate applying for jobs, make sure your resume is prepared to deal with applicant tracking systems.  Learn seven things involved with ATS you should know about in the following post.

Here at Jobscan, we published an article about how to make the best possible impression in the ten seconds it takes recruiters to decide whether your resume is destined for the dustbin. But that advice only applies to those job applicants fortunate enough to have their resumes looked at by actual human beings – a rare occurrence,

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Posted April 25, 2014 by

Build Up Your Skills for an Interview Presentation

Young man smiling while holding a microphone in front of him

Young man smiling while holding a microphone in front of him. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

When you apply for a job after graduation, you may be asked to give a presentation in front of an interviewer or a panel as part of the screening process. This is often a requirement for sales, marketing, or other positions that call for face-to-face meetings with clients or management.

Public speaking can be nerve-wracking, let alone presenting to decision makers who may or may not give you that sought-after break. The butterflies in your stomach are just one of the many physical indicators of tension – you’ll also sweat profusely, your body may shake, and in a worst-case scenario, you may experience mental block. (more…)

Posted December 26, 2012 by

How to Make the Interviewer See You as the Best Applicant

CollegeRecruiter.comDuring a job interview, you need to convince an employer that you’re the ideal candidate for a position.  The following post explains how to do so.

One of the most important aspects of mock interviewing programs is often overlooked. That aspect, making the interviewer link you to the position you are applying for as the best candidate, needs to be honed. It’s not difficult and a couple of simple questions are usually enough to do the trick. What is important is that in answering them the interviewer is already imagining you as the person filling the position.

This article:

How to Make the Interviewer See You as the Best Applicant