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Posted April 02, 2016 by

How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

1. Avoid cramming

If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

2. Create a habit

Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

3. Study locations

The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

4. Set specific goals

If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

5. Don’t procrastinate

Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Brooke Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted April 27, 2015 by

7 Reasons Why You Should Establish Credit While You Are In College

Smiling college student with credit card and laptop

Smiling college student with credit card and laptop. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

One of the rites of passage for college students is obtaining credit cards and beginning to establish their financial history. For some, the availability of new credit is an opportunity for expenditures that are out of reach, but for others it presents the valuable chance to establish their credit for the future.

If you are wondering if it is worth it to apply for a credit card or other type of financing arrangement, there are some good reasons to do so that have nothing to do with a shopping excursion or spring vacation. Credit card companies are willing to take a chance on college students even without a credit history, and you should take advantage of the opportunity to establish your credit even before you apply for your first job. (more…)

Posted March 24, 2015 by

First Apartment Necessities

Sarah Landrum photo

Sarah Landrum

If you’re just moving in to your first ever apartment or home of your own, you’re probably pretty psyched right now. All of that newfound independence to do what you want when you want it: what could be better than that? If you’re used to your parents picking up the groceries and other house necessities, or if your old college roommates always reminded you when you were getting low on toilet paper, being on your own might come as a bit of a shock.

There’s a lot you’re going to need to take care of on your own, so get organized. Keep one of those notepads on your fridge so you can scribble down when you’re out of eggs. Nobody likes getting back from the store only to realize they’ve forgotten something. And keep a calendar. Seriously. This will keep you on track and remind you to do all of the things on time. (more…)

Posted March 24, 2015 by

Everything You Need to Know to Move Out After Graduating College

Sarah Landrum photo

Sarah Landrum

I’m sure we can all pretty much agree that the freedom and independence of college life is great. Your significant other can stay over whenever you please, you can blast the music as loud as you want, and ordering Chinese food in the middle of the night is totally acceptable. When you’re living with your best friends, there’s no one around to judge you. That’s why moving back in with your parents after graduating from college might seem like a bit of a culture shock, or even a nightmare.

There are ways to move out on your own after college. Whether you’re tired of your parents or are relocating for a new job, we’ll walk you through it. (more…)

Posted April 11, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Do You Have a Phone Interview Coming Up? Things You Need to Remember

If you are an internship finder with a phone interview coming up, the following post has some things for you to keep in mind for success.

Featured: Featured Internship season is in high gear and I know a lot of you are dealing with phone interviews; especially those of you who plan on going to another state or country for a summer internship. Here are some of my top tips to rock the phone interview: 1. Show the employee you can carry the

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Posted August 28, 2013 by

Goodbye College, Hello Real Life: Apartment Advice for the Recently Graduated

goldfish jumping out of the waterIf you are one of the two million recent graduates that Forbes predicts will enter the workforce this year, you’ve probably thought about getting your own place. Living at home or with roommates is economical, but at some point, you just want the freedom of doing your own thing. When this time comes, keep these tips about style and safety in mind—college is behind you. There’s a new level of responsibility involved in getting your own place. (more…)

Posted August 23, 2013 by

Internship Finder, Are You Considering Working in TV? 4 Factors to Keep in Mind

If you are an internship finder who is interested in television, the following post has four factors to consider before accepting an offer.

Featured: Not Featured Do you dream of working on a TV show? Do you fantasize about being part of Hannah Horvath’s “New York” or Juliette Barnes’ “Nashville?” Are you the kind of person who already has your picks for the 2013 Emmys — and not just the actors, but also the

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