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Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

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John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted November 11, 2015 by

Three tips for military service members enrolling in higher education

Three tips for military service members enrolling in higher education

Tracey Thomas, making a difference in military service members' lives  at UACCB since 2003

Tracey Thomas, making a difference in military service members’ lives at UACCB since 2003

Understanding VA Educational Benefits

Military service members are often on “information overload” after exiting the military, so they may bypass or misunderstand information given to them. The best thing veterans can do after discharge is talk to a School Certifying Official about the process of accessing VA (Veterans Affairs) Education Benefits. Understanding how to access their benefits, the rules and regulations required for maintaining their benefits and how their benefits payout will help eliminate any misunderstandings and stress. This also allows service members to make informed decisions when presented with options and when deciding how best to juggle school, family, employment, and finances. Active, Reserve, and National Guard members face these same challenges plus a few more because they may qualify for tuition assistance and/or a state funded benefit, so learning the regulations and processes of multiple VA Education Benefits can be especially overwhelming. Navigating this process is not something students should attempt alone.

Don’t rush the process

Trying to jump into school a few weeks after discharge may cause unnecessary stress. It takes time for the Department of Veteran Affairs to process a new application, as well as other types of financial aid, so this will cause a delay in receiving financial assistance. Sometimes it’s better to delay enrollment for one semester, allowing service members adequate time to submit all required documents for college admissions offices; this also ensures all available financial aid is in place when enrolling. This prevents undue stress and frustrations, so service members and veterans can fully concentrate on successfully completing their classes.

Overload of courses

Since VA Education Benefits are limited (36-48 months), some service members try to take an overload of courses to complete their programs quickly. About a month into the semester, service members realize they took on too much when trying to juggle employment, family, and school. If classes are dropped, this may lead to overpayments of financial aid and/or their VA Education Benefits. Service members need to remember it is better to take an extra semester to successfully complete all courses stress-free than to fail or drop courses due to overload and possibly end up in overpayment as well.

Above all, service members should keep in touch with their local School Certifying Official(s) to receive prompt answers to questions, to avoid miscommunication regarding benefits, and to receive support and encouragement while on campus. We’re here to help.

 

Tracey Thomas, Assistant Registrar/School Certifying Official at the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville (UACCB) since 2003, provides daily assistance to service members and their families in accessing their VA Education Benefits, informing them of VA requirements, certifying enrollment to the VA, providing academic advising, tracking attendance and progress, and offering a listening ear when they become frustrated or want to share their stories of success and accomplishment. Tracey also serves as a mentor for the School Certifying Officials in Arkansas. She says the best part of her job is helping service members and their families. “I feel we owe them for their sacrifices, so it’s important for me to give a little back.”

 

Posted August 06, 2015 by

How a Medical Scribe Position Prepares You for Medical School

empty notebook with a pen on the table

Empty notebook with a pen on the table. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The decision to apply to medical school is not easy. Before students can even apply, they must complete rigorous coursework, volunteer or work in a clinical setting, score well on the MCAT exam, and more.

Then comes the more important part: actually getting accepted to medical school. Standing out among thousands of other applicants can seem daunting. Fortunately, there are opportunities for students interested in medical school or other healthcare careers that can enhance their resume or graduate school application. (more…)

Posted February 06, 2015 by

Cracking the MBA Admissions Code with the Perfect Job History

Yael Redelman-Sidi photo

Yael Redelman-Sidi, Founder of Admit1MBA & Admit2Med

If you’re in college and already know you will need an MBA to achieve your career goals (maybe you want to work for Private Equity or become a product manager for Google), you have to be careful and creative while considering the career path that will most increase your chances of admission to top business programs.

Leading programs like Wharton, Harvard, Columbia Business School, NYU Stern and MIT receive thousands of applications, with as many as 20 people competing for each spot in the class. The decision of the MBA admissions board is influenced by whether your professional and personal experience will allow you to make valuable contributions in the classroom. Your time in the workforce has to be meaningful and relevant. (more…)

Posted November 20, 2014 by

Online Reputation Matters In Helping University Applicants Improve Admissions Odds

College admissions building

College admissions building. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Here’s a question: How many times have you used Google to search for something? Here’s another question: How many times have you read reviews online about a product or a restaurant and made a judgment simply from reading those reviews? You may have even decided not to go to that restaurant or not to buy a product you were previously interested in solely because of reading information online.

If you’re like the majority of the population, then one, you’ve searched Google thousands upon thousands of times, and, two, at one point or another you’ve also made a decision about something simply based on what you’ve heard about it online. (more…)

Posted August 18, 2014 by

Pursuing MS in Germany: Universities and Application Procedure

Swati Srivastava

Swati Srivastava

Germany is renowned all over the world for its quality education system and not simply in engineering. Almost two and half million students all over the country end up applying for MS programs in German University; read the following post to know more about pursuing MS in Germany.

Germany being one of the reputed industrial countries in Europe, has the status of achieving great technological progress amongst the other countries of the world and has been well known for playing a significant role for economic development in the western hemisphere. (more…)

Posted July 31, 2014 by

3 Tips to Graduate College Debt-Free (or Close to It)

Young male graduate in cap and gown holding piggy bank

Young male graduate in cap and gown holding piggy bank. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The severity of the student loan debt crisis in the U.S. varies depending on whom you ask. The average 2013 college graduate left school with $29,400 in student loan debt, according to the Project On Student Debt. But a 2014 report by the Brookings Institute indicates that student loan debt is no more of a detriment to borrowers today than it was 25 years ago. One key finding from the same study is that the median amount of student loan debt for 20 to 40 year-olds is only $8,500, indicating the average is skewed by extreme outliers.

Either way, the best way to handle student loan debt and the effects thereof is to not accumulate any in the first place. These three tips will help you graduate with little to no debt. (more…)

Posted May 08, 2014 by

How to Impress a College Recruiter with Your MBA Application

If you want your MBA application to make a favorable impression with a college recruiter when it comes to your resume, essay, and interview, find out how in the following post.

As soon as you decided to apply to their MBA program, the school had to have you. Your resume earned universal admiration, your essay made them swoon and the interview was a formality. Welcome to the class of 20XX! Nothing could be further from the reality of today’s competitive MBA application process. No matter how

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Posted April 23, 2014 by

Serving the Student-Customer

Happy female student working on a laptop

Happy female student working on a laptop. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

A funny thing happened on the way to the student services office during the first week of classes. The long winding line of students had disappeared, replaced by small groups and individuals contentedly tapping away on their mobile devices.

Campuses today are serving a tech-savvy, always connected generation of students that is increasingly empowered to learn and communicate in a non-traditional way – on their own time using their own devices.  This culture of anytime, anywhere communication, with its accompanying expectation of a real-time response, is a challenge that higher education institutions across the country, including the The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, have met using an array of strategies. (more…)

Posted March 05, 2014 by

What a College Recruiter Might Tell You About Going to College

Prospective students can get some advice that a college recruiter might share with them about going to college in the following post.

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