ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 17, 2017 by

Recruiting salespeople who are adaptable, not just competent

 

You obviously want a competent sales team, as that’s tied to the rest of your financial performance and metrics. But the definition of “competence” may be somewhat shifting in the sales function. You need to be recruiting salespeople who can adapt and adjust to a new environment fairly quickly. And that’s likely to require new approaches to thinking about, and measuring, candidates in our sales pipelines.

The value and quantification of sales

Sales is also one of the most trackable elements of an organization. While the ROI on a training program or employee engagement program could be more subjective, sales is often very direct. Salesperson A sold X-items for Y-total, and Salesperson B sold A-items for B-total. If Y is higher than B, we can infer Salesperson A did a better job in that time frame (typically a quarter).

At the intersection point of “crucial function” and “relatively easy to measure/compare,” we come to this question of whether hiring managers overrate competence.

Competence and adaptability

First: in this context, I define “competence” as conventional recruitment markers of success. For a salesperson, you’d measure their previous sales. For an entry-level salesperson, it might be GPA, college attended, etc.

One of the biggest arguments against hiring on conventional competence measures is that skill sets can be learned. Today, salespeople need to be adaptable. The idea of “adaptability” is that a salesperson could learn a new skill set (or learn how to sell a new product/service) within a relatively short amount of time, even if his or her background was in an entirely different industry. In essence, it means someone who is receptive or responsive to changing priorities at work.

Don’t hire brilliant jerks

There are some generalizations here. In a long-form article on Quartz a few years ago called “This is why people leave your company,” Netflix CEO Reed Hastings had this to say (see photo below):  (more…)

Posted May 19, 2016 by

Soft skills in the workplace: IBM offers tips to candidates

When entry-level candidates apply for jobs, they often claim to have great soft skills. However, after employers hire candidates, they may find that candidates don’t have the excellent soft skills they boasted about possessing. This creates a problem for employers in the onboarding process and afterward, too, as they are left to deal with new employees lacking basic soft skills required to adapt to the workplace and corporate culture.

Can the new employees interact well with their teammates? Are they capable of making strong decisions on their own without input from management every step of the way? Do new employees manage their time well, resolve conflicts as they arise, and communicate clearly, effectively, and appropriately with clients and coworkers? If the answer to any of these questions is ‘no,’ employers have big—often expensive–problems on their hands.

Pete Joodi, Distinguished Engineer for IBM, provides entry-level job seekers and employers with insight into why soft skills matter so much in today’s workplace, particularly in the field of information technology. In this interview by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, Pete Joodi discusses the soft skills dilemma.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

At IBM, Pete Joodi, Distinguished Engineer, focuses on research and innovation in information technology. He focuses on optimization strategies; his goal is to find ways software and technology can improve energy efficiency, cost containment, and compliance.

Pete mentions that within the last 50 years, the world has truly expanded thanks to technology. We need to know how to work with each other now more than ever. This is the reason soft skills are more important than ever before.

IBM conducted a study in 2014. One of its findings indicated that soft skills are in great demand by employers but are most lacking in students graduating from institutions of higher education today. Pete Joodi doesn’t see this as a negative finding, however. Instead, it indicates an opportunity for growth and improvement for employers.

At IBM, the focus is on leading and contributing to technological innovation in the ‘cognitive era.’ Candidates applying at IBM need the following soft skills in order to succeed: communication skills, teamwork and collaboration skills, problem-solving skills, adaptability and flexibility skills, language and translation skills, ability to interact well with colleagues and clients, critical thinking skills, and conflict resolution skills.

Truly, soft skills are highly relevant at IBM. The world is more complex than it was, but it’s also more rewarding to work in the world today. In order to create consumable products, IBM and other companies must hire candidates with excellent soft skills.

For more details about how to improve your soft skills, transferable skills, and non-verbal skills, visit CollegeRecruiter.com, follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

 

Posted August 28, 2015 by

Why Working from Home is Good for Employees and Employers

Adaptability and flexibility are two primary requirements for the majority of roles today. The ability to change job location and hours of work can be a condition of employment in most contracts. In recent years, many corporations have started to implement telecommuting strategies, whereby employees work from home or in remote locations. Incredibly, 36% of workers would choose the option of working from home ahead of a pay rise, while 46% of companies that have introduced telework state that it has reduced attrition. (more…)

Posted September 09, 2014 by

Will You Find an Internship that Leads to a New Job Opportunity?

What are the chances that you find an internship that will turn into a new job?  The following post features an infographic that may tell you.

According to a study by NACE, internship to job conversion has risen to 51.2 percent. So, your internship is more likely to turn into a full-time job now, right? Well, maybe. This interactive infographic depicts data from a new LinkedIn study about the correlation between students who do internships and how often those internships turn into full-time jobs

Link:

Continue Reading

Posted June 13, 2014 by

Just Started an Entry Level Job? 6 Ways to Move Ahead in Your Career

Now that you have started your entry level job, are you wondering how to move ahead in your career?  Learn six ways to do so in the following post.

John and Sally worked in the same company at the same position. Over the course of 12 months, John got sponsored to a promotion by his manager, worked his way up at two more companies and finally settled for a managerial position at the age of 28. She did earn several good raises and performance reviews, but that’s

This article –

Continue Reading

Posted June 03, 2014 by

Want to Land an Entry Level Job or Internship in 2014? Top 10 Skills that Interest Employers

To boost your chances of landing an entry level job or an internship in 2014, learn the top 10 skills that are interesting to employers in the following post.

Featured: Featured Last week, I moderated a think tank for Dell in New York City. The topic of the think tank was Gen Y in the “real world” (get the connection with my book? Welcome to the Real World). I sat around a table for several hours with great students, entrepreneurs, and employers and held

Originally posted here:

Continue Reading

Posted August 09, 2013 by

5 Reasons to be a Medical Intern Abroad

Medical intern at a hospital

Medical intern at a hospital. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Have you thought about getting an internship in medicine?  If the answer is yes, consider five reasons to intern abroad.

International volunteer organization Projects Abroad has been organizing medical placements in the developing world since the mid-90s. There are many great reasons for students to get involved with medical work abroad. Here are the organization’s top five: (more…)

Posted October 16, 2012 by

Nothing About a Job Is Absolutely Perfect. Are You a Dinosaur or a Cockroach?

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez of Great Resumes Fast

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez of Great Resumes Fast

What an illustration, right? I almost can’t believe I’m about to share this, but I heard it the other day, and I thought: what a remarkable notion and weird analogy … so I thought, wow! our readers might get a kick out of this … (more…)