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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 18, 2016 by

3 tips for a successful situational interview

Business cartoon showing psychologist asking interviewee dog a question courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Cartoonresource/Shutterstock.com

Have you ever had a situational interview? In situational interviews, interviewers ask candidates questions on how they might handle specific situations in the workplace; these interviews differ from behavioral interviews. When recruiters ask you behavioral questions, they ask you how you have handled situations in the past. When recruiters ask you situational questions, they want to know how you would hypothetically handle situations should they occur in the future. For students and recent grads who may lack work experience, situational questions give you a chance to shine and showcase your problem solving and critical thinking skills. These interviews also tell potential employers whether or not you’re the right cultural fit for their companies based on what you will do in the future, not what you’ve done in the past. Whether you’re a college student, recent graduate, or other job seeker, here are three tips to prepare you for a successful situational interview.

1. See yourself in the job.

When answering questions, answer them to explain the way you might behave in real settings in the workplace. Describe the action you would take as an employee and explain why you would take that action.

2. Research potential employers.

You don’t want to go into any interview without researching a potential employer. Understanding a company’s policies and company culture will give you a better idea of what it expects of employees. This can help you answer situational interview questions because you can, at least partly, base your responses on research.

3. Avoid profanity and stay positive.

Be careful not to use profanity during your situational interview. You may not only offend the interviewer, but you also leave a negative impression of how you might talk to co-workers. Stay positive, and keep focused on how you will help a potential employer. Never bash former employers or focus on what has gone wrong in the past. Situational interviews give you the chance to discuss what you might do differently if given the chance, so focus on being positive, hopeful, and optimistic.

Situational interviews foreshadow what job seekers could be like in the workplace. Prepare to answer questions relevant to the job and company you’re interested in, so employers will see you as the best fit for them.

Do you need more information on interviewing for your job search? Click on over to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted May 22, 2015 by

A Graduate’s Guide to Getting Motivated

Brad McMurrey photo

Brad McMurrey

Your personal and career success are going to depend on more than what you learned in college. Having the ability to motivate yourself could be more important than any knowledge you have. Since they don’t teach this in school, here are some key motivational thoughts that might help.

1. You make your life. Consider this sentence with emphasis on each important word:

· You make your life. It’s up to you, no one else.

· You make your life. It doesn’t just happen. You have to act.

· You make your life. It’s your life that’s at stake. (more…)

Posted April 20, 2015 by

The Top 10 Ingredients For Being An “A Player” In Business (And Life)

Letter A for sign with light bulbs

Letter A for sign with light bulbs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

What is an A player?

An A Player is someone who is amazing at what they do, creates value for others, and always delivers, both in their careers and at home.

The office ninja who never says “ That’s not in my job description.” Is an A player.

The super job candidate who has to sort through dozens of job offers, and nails every interview is an A player.

The Rockstar Entrepreneur who guides his new company through the growing pains is an A player and there are a million more examples.

If we’re being honest with ourselves not only do we respect and admire A players for their success, we’re also a little bit jealous.

We think “ What’s that guy(or girl) got that I don’t?”

In order for you to unlock your potential, and become an A player, you have to know what it is that makes someone an A player. (more…)

Posted February 09, 2015 by

Are You a Successful or Unsuccessful Person?

Everybody wants success, everybody endeavors to achieve success; however, not everybody knows the proven effective, time tested secrets of taming success. You only have to meet a few successful people to realize that what separates them from the hordes of unsuccessful people in the same companies, organizations, colleges, and households is the set of habits and ideologies they adopt in life. Value your time, plan for the long term, be action oriented, stay away from negative thoughts, plan and track efforts and effectiveness – do all this, and you will never be chasing success. On the other hand, habits like wasting time, restricting information flow, mistreating juniors, letting distractions seep in, seeking joy in the failure of others, and taking the shortcuts to temporary results are telltale signs of unsuccessful people at work. Make the right choices, you now know everything about the well-guarded secrets of success. (more…)

Posted November 20, 2014 by

3 Easy Ways to Keep Your Interviewer from Zoning Out

Lisa Quast

Lisa Quast

Often, job candidates are so worried about saying the right thing during an interview that they forget how to keep another person (in this instance your interviewer!) engaged in a conversation. Obviously there’s more weighing on this conversation than a chat with your parents or best friend, and this means you need to display the best version of yourself. However, focusing too much on “covering everything” or “saying the right thing” can lead to boring your interviewer with drawn out answers – a surefire way to cause him or her to zone out. Practice and master the below tactics before your next interview to make sure this doesn’t happen to you! (more…)

Posted September 12, 2014 by

Work on an Entry Level Job? How to Approach it Like a Boss

No matter whether you work on an entry level job or another position, you can have the mentality of a boss.  Find out how in the following post.

Don’t let Lonely Island mislead you; there’s more to acting like a boss than rolling high and taking liberties with your subordinates’ desks. It encompasses everything from refilling the coffee pot like a boss to going after that big-name client like a boss. No task is too big or too small to tackle with the

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Posted August 28, 2014 by

College Students, 10 Tips for Networking at Different Times When Searching for Jobs

When networking in their searches for jobs, college students should apply these 10 tips in the following post.

In an article for the Huffington Post, I shared with readers my love for informal, even random, networking – and how I seem to be a magnet for bizarre networking encounters. (One such encounter happened in the locker room wrapped only in a towel!) As much as I seem to attract these random networking opportunities, when it comes to

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Posted August 25, 2014 by

Want to Change Entry Level Jobs for Your Career? Online Tools to Move Forward

For young professionals who believe their careers would benefit by changing entry level jobs, the following post has some online tools to help them find new employment.

Stuck in a job you don’t like anymore? Want a career change but don’t know how? Ready to step on a new journey to discover a satisfying career? Yes! There are many of us everywhere who are pondering this question now. Although career change is not easy, but in the recent years

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Posted August 07, 2014 by

Want to Write a Winning Resume to Impress Recruiters? Try this New Formula

Most job seekers understand that an impressive resume can get the attention of recruiters.   To achieve this goal, the following post suggests a new formula that just might help.

I’ve read hundreds of articles on job searching… possibly even topping a thousand. By far, the one topic talked about most in these articles: resumes. And many of these articles recommend the use of action verbs, quantification and the direct impact of your contributions. The goal: to show you did something that contributed directly to the

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Posted July 23, 2014 by

Want to Change Careers, College Graduates and Find New Jobs? 5 Ways Not to Limit Yourself Mentally

For college graduates who want to find jobs in new careers, it is important for them not to limit themselves mentally in these five ways found in the following post.

You probably fell into your current career. Yes, I know you planned. You carefully considered your choice of degree. You got a job you were qualified for. But you only assessed opportunities that were right in front of your nose.   Your choices were (unwittingly) limited. Limited by your environment.

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