ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

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Posted October 04, 2019 by

What’s changing in talent acquisition?

We launched our job board, CollegeRecruiter.com, 23 years ago in 1996 but have seen more embracement of technology and data to drive decisions by employers in the past two years than we did in the previous 21 years combined.

Our employer customers used to talk about how they were using data to make decisions, but what many (not all) were actually doing was using data to justify decisions. Now, many and perhaps most are actually using data to make their decisions. Two, tangible results of that:

  1. Very few data-driven employers prefer to buy job postings on a traditional, duration-basis because they can see that performance-based postings are more effective, efficient, or both. By effective, I mean that they generate enough, quality candidates to allow the employer to meet its hiring objectives, whether they’re trying to hire one, 10, or 100 people through the posting.
  2. Most data-driven employers are either using programmatic technology to distribute their jobs or their vendors are. Programmatic job ad distribution is largely killing the ability of media to sell postings based upon proxies like how many registered users they have, site traffic, and whether they purchased a Super Bowl ad. But it is also leading to problems with diversity and inclusion, as too many employers and vendors are looking at only the effective cost per application (eCPA) to determine where to run ads and not considering that certain audiences are just going to be more expensive to reach and that it is worthwhile spending that extra money in some but not all cases.

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Posted March 15, 2019 by

Are diversity and inclusion hiring efforts undermined by the shift to programmatic, CPC job advertising?

Over the past couple of years, College Recruiter has undergone a remarkable transformation. As was the case since the dawn of recruitment advertising a few hundred years ago, all of our employer customers were advertising their part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level job opportunities with us on a traditional, duration-basis such as $X for 30-days.

Today, virtually all of the postings on our site are pay-for-performance such as cost-per-click and most of those are programmatic, meaning that the jobs we receive and the CPC we receive are based upon pre-set rules created by the employer customers, their advertising agencies, or their job distributors. Hopefully, that quick overview helps to illustrate why I wrote above that our people, process, product, and price have undergone a remarkable transformation.

I thought that readers of this blog would appreciate a little information about what we’re seeing happening in the marketplace right now. Some of the traditional, ad agencies are doing a good job in terms of advising their customers as to what CPC’s to pay, what jobs to distribute, expectations, etc. Some aren’t.

A common theme across almost all ad agencies — but not all — is that the overriding metric of success is minimizing the CPC and/or eCPA. I understand the desire to use objective metrics like that, but I’m also hearing frustration from some on the employer side who are appreciating their reduced costs per and time to hire but concerned about the negative impact these programs are having on their diversity and inclusion hiring efforts and, therefore, the long-term productivity of their workforce. 

What a small number of employers and advertising agencies are starting to appreciate is that the lowest CPC and lowest eCPA typically translates into a higher percentage of candidates coming from a smaller percentage of sources, which reduces the diversity of the applicant pool. Note that when I talk about diversity, I’m not just talking about race or gender. I’m also talking about socioeconomic and other such backgrounds. If a disproportionately large number of applicants come from low cost, general aggregators, then the candidate pool will also be general and therefore anything but diverse.

A couple of the ad agencies we work with are segmenting their budgets so they allocate $A to general aggregators; $B to industry-specific, niche sites; $C to geographic-specific, niche sites; $D to college-specific sites; etc. Within each of those groups, they use CPC and eCPA as measures of success, but they don’t expect or need the CPC or eCPA for the niche sites to be as low as those from the aggregator sites.

From what we can see on our end, most of the job exports from the advertising agencies are being managed to minimize CPC and eCPA instead of the more nuanced approach that we’re starting to see from a small number of other, more cutting edge ad agencies whose clients value a diverse and inclusive candidate pool so much that they’re willing to pay for it. Talk can be cheap, but these ad agencies and their customers aren’t just talking the talk, but they’re also walking the walk.

Posted April 11, 2018 by

Diversity and inclusion in university relations: From compliance to increased productivity

 

SHRM18 Blogger GraphicFor years, I’ve been hearing employers talk about the importance of hiring a diverse workforce. Probably my first encounter with a formalized approach to attain this goal was way back in 1989 when I worked for Honeywell as a student. Down the hall from my department was our Office of Affirmative Action. Typical for that era, the reason for the existence of the office was far more about compliance than furthering any other business objective.

Now let’s flash forward a couple of decades. Not only were the names of these offices changing to include words like diversity but so were the objectives. Some of the world’s largest and most respected employers of college and university students and recent graduates were diversifying their candidate pools. They weren’t doing it just for compliance. More importantly, they were seeing data showing that more diverse workforces were more productive workforces. (more…)

Posted March 07, 2018 by

How to measure the quality of new hires

focus on quality of hireOver the past couple of years, we’ve seen a huge shift in thought amongst our Fortune 1,000 company and federal government agency customers regarding how they measure the quality of their new hires. Until a few years ago, talent acquisition in these organizations hardly measured the quality of hire at all and often not at all. Their focus, if they were data-oriented, was on cost-per-hire.
Today, there’s a shift to looking at productivity and that almost always includes longevity as a key component. If someone is only with you for a year or two, it will be hard for them to be as productive over their career with your organization as someone who is with you for five to ten years. The result? More and more large employers are placing greater and greater emphasis on hiring candidates who on paper may not be as sexy as others, but who are more likely to stay for far longer than those who attended fancier schools.
Posted November 16, 2016 by

Job postings on College Recruiter outperform those on competitor sites by 472.4 percent

Apply NowEver hear the expression about it being important now and then to stop and smell the roses? Well, I just did that and was it ever refreshing.

A potential new client of College Recruiter challenged us to do more than just tell him that his job postings would work well on College Recruiter. He wanted to know how much better they would likely work on our site as compared to other job boards and he wanted us to provide to him actual data rather than just estimates. He was certainly asking a lot more of us than most of our potential clients but good for him. An informed client makes for a happy client.

The client had two main questions:

1. What is the average number of views per job? We attached to our emailed response an  example of a monthly job detail report that we emailed to an organization which is quite different from the client’s in terms of what they offer to their clients but quite similar in terms of how we envision working with the client. As you can see, in September we ran 1,370 jobs for the existing. Note that jobs were activated on virtually every day of the month and so the average job ran for only half of the month. We tracked and report 15,020 views for an average of 10.96 views per job. Given that the average job ran for half of the month, that equates to 21.93 views per job. (more…)

Posted September 29, 2016 by

Do you use vanity metrics to measure recruitment?

 

Do you know the difference between “vanity metrics” and “business metrics?” Many people assume they do, but oftentimes they don’t.

Vanity metrics are aspects of a business we track because the numbers are larger or more impressive, and it sounds better to present them to our bosses and other stakeholders.

Examples of vanity metrics  (more…)