• Not sure what to major in? See if your passion fits these in-demand degrees.

    August 16, 2017 by

     

    If you haven’t selected a major yet, you are probably getting all kinds of advice from peers, parents, faculty and everyone with an opinion on social media. Many advise that you study what you’re interested in. To follow your heart, because that way you’ll find a job you’re passionate about.

    Considering a major that will actually be in demand

    I agree wholeheartedly that you should study what you care about. But shouldn’t you at least know what degrees are actually in demand, so you can make an informed decision?  Continue Reading

  • Talent acquisition in high volume: Tips for creating a high touch candidate experience

    August 09, 2017 by

     

    Just because you have to hire a cohort of 1,000 entry level employees every year doesn’t mean your hiring process needs to be low-touch or non-engaging. Janine Truitt, Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations, offers some excellent tips for talent acquisition leaders who have high volume needs. Truitt is an expert in innovative training and products that arm businesses with the knowledge and tools they need to succeed. Read her advice below on how large employers with at-scale hiring needs can still provide a high-touch and positive candidate experience. Continue Reading

  • Fall 2017 college recruitment trends and challenges [white paper]

    July 27, 2017 by

     

    As the 2017-18 school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. College Recruiter teamed up with our friends at NAS Recruitment Innovation to create a white paper chock full of insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs this fall. Continue Reading

  • Take a vacation to deal with burnout

    July 26, 2017 by

     

    Burnout is more than a catchy word. If you haven’t been in the workforce long, let’s hope you haven’t actually experienced burnout. There are real symptoms to watch out for, and if any of these sound familiar, you are due to take a vacation. Expert career coach Joanne Meehl of Joanne Meehl Career Services advises her clients to watch for “a severe imbalance.” The symptoms of burnout that she has seen are “frustration out of proportion to the problem at hand, a drying up of creativity and increasing reliance on ‘the way it’s been done here before’, increasing isolation or rejection of the team, and micromanaging for control.”

    Sound familiar? Time to take a vacation, and we’ll get to that. If not, we recommend you preempt the burnout and make sure your work doesn’t take over your life.  Continue Reading

  • Confused about pay for performance? Get a peek behind the curtain [podcast]

    July 16, 2017 by

     

    Anyone paying attention to talent acquisition trends or recruitment technology is aware of the rise of pay for performance recruitment advertising, and programmatic advertising. It can be a confusing space, at least technically. So for many recruiters, it unfortunately has the effect of scaring them off. Recruiters and HR leaders: if you admit to being confused, you can probably also admit that the trend is only rising. Here you can get a peek behind the curtain and clear up your understanding. HRExaminer interviewed College Recruiter’s founder and president, Steven Rothberg. Rothberg shares an insider’s view of what about programmatic advertising scares job boards, what job boards do better than employer career sites, and the problematic method employers measure sources like job boards.

    Listen to the interview here, or read major takeaways below.

     

    The job board is not dead. Enter, pay for performance.

    There was an effort to brand job boards as dying, but it was really an effort by third party recruiters to convince their customers—the employers—to spend money in new ways. Whether that was social media, an executive search or whatever, the facts just weren’t there.

    There certainly are many job boards that have died. There are also many social media sites that have died. Executive recruiting firms have died. Companies come and go, business models come and go. But what we’re really seeing is a remarkable transformation that started about three years ago. The job boards that are thriving have begun to migrate from a “post and pray” model (duration based postings where an employer buys a posting package for a certain period of time, regardless of the results). Instead they are rapidly shifting to pay for performance. Pay for performance is typically pay-per-click: the candidate sees the job on the job board, they click the apply button, they go over to employers’ ATS and the job board is paid for that click.

    Consumer marketers started doing pay for performance about 15 years ago.

    pay for performance in consumer marketingThis model is entirely consistent with how Google got themselves on the map. Before Google, pay-per-click advertising existed, but Google was the first one in the consumer marketing space to really do it well. Now, 15 years later, the talent acquisition and job search industry is realizing it can work for us, too.

    The duration-based model puts the risk of the job posting not performing well on the employer (or their advertising vendor). At College Recruiter, we know we have a lot more control than the employer over how many people see a posting, and how many people click to apply. Factors like salary and the quality of a job description are all relevant, but it’s our job to get people to the ad to begin with, so the risk should lie with us.

    A lot of job search sites feel very threatened by the pay for performance model because they’re used to selling postings for, say, $250 bucks for 30 days. And they see a pretty fat profit margin, maybe 60-70 percent. But with pay for performance, the job board might get 20 or 30 cents per click. Now, the job board is forced to actually deliver enough candidates to that employer so they can hire enough people. That brings us to another discussion about metrics, which we’ll get into later.

    Job boards are better than company career sites

    What’s really exciting about the job search industry is that we are way better at marketing employers’ opportunities than the employers are themselves. Our sites tend to be much more mobile friendly. Our sites tend to have candidate-friendly features like the one-click apply button. We tend not to have password protection in order to see the postings. That creates a better experience for the candidate.

    Related: Why employers should focus on improving the candidate experience

    There is another reason job boards are better. Google has now introduced their own job search product, Google for Jobs. If a candidate searches for a job on Google, and Google see a job from some company using an awful ATS, they won’t send the user there, because chances are it’s going to be an awful user experience. But when Google sees that job posted on a job board like College Recruiter, and that site provides a much better candidate experience, they’re going to point that candidate to CollegeRecruiter.com, instead of to the employer’s career site.

    Employers need to truly measure the effectiveness of job boards

    Two years ago, virtually none of our employer customers were willing to have a conversation around how many candidates they actually needed us to deliver, in order for them to hire enough people. They didn’t even know how many applications they would typically receive for each hire. And they knew even less about how many clicks they would need to generate in order to hire one person. So it made sense that employers would have no way of knowing what kind of performance to purchase. Should they buy $10 worth of clicks? $100? $1,000?

    Now, there are tools out there that will tell employers that if you get, say, a thousand people clicking to your site, you’ll probably see about 100 applications, and if you get 100 applications you’ll probably hire four people, for example.

    White paper: How Employers Evaluate Career Services, Job Boards and Other Sources

    This presents a great opportunity for job search sites to scale up, especially in entry level recruitment. Because large employers don’t have a need to hire just one intern; they’re hiring a dozen or 100 interns. If you run a posting for a retail sales associate in Kansas City, you’re never going to be able to hire 10 or 20 people from a single posting under the old, duration-based model. You just wouldn’t get enough candidates to apply. But under the new model, we can drive thousands of people to a job posting that is operating on a pay-per-performance basis. College Recruiter currently uses both models right now, but in two years, it’s likely that duration-based postings will be a thing of the past.

    Two exciting things happening in talent acquisition

    Employers will learn how much to spend using programmatic advertisingEmployers now have the opportunity to better align their goals with those of their sourcing partners. For a long time now, executive recruiters have aligned their interests with the employers. They only got paid if they found a candidate that the employer decided to hire. Now that’s happening with recruitment media.

    Within a year or two, it is very possible that nearly all ATS are going to allow an employer to post a job on their career site, then check a box to “sponsor” that job. Then they’ll be able to pick how much they want to spend, given the ATS’ recommendation, which would consider the number of candidates you need in order to make all your hires. It should be able to tell the employer that they need to buy, say, 2000 clicks at 47 cents per click, which job boards will be the best, and then programmatically send the job posting to those job boards.

    Programmatic advertising is not the same as pay for performance

    A lot of people get programmatic advertising mixed up with pay for performance . Programmatic means the advertiser uses a computer with a set of rules that determine which ads to post, which not to post, and when.

    Some companies that do programmatic ad buying on behalf of employers will have a contract with a job board that gives them, say, 25 slots where they can post whatever job they want. They can post one job in that lot today and another job for three days, or their job for five days, etc. Programmatic advertising allows employers—without needing any human intervention—to always run the best-performing job ad. For example, a posting for a nursing position might generate a really good response for three days, and then the response tails off. Perhaps after three days, any nurses that are going to apply have already applied, and the programmatic advertising engine will automatically see that. It will then replace that nursing posting with a physical therapist posting, which might run for 10 days.

    Programmatic gets tied to pay for performance because employers that are using one tend to use the other.

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email [email protected]

  • College Recruiter is a featured presenter in the Grad CareerFestival designed to help unemployed grads land jobs quicker

    July 10, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (July 10, 2017)–Grad Career/Festival is scheduled for July 27th– July 29th from 11 am – 10 pm daily (EDT). This event seeks to help college grads land a job 2.4 months more quickly! 33 hours of career advice!

    It takes over 7 months for average grad to find employment

    With nearly two million students graduating from college in May and June, it’s not surprising that it will take the average graduate 7.4 months to find employment.   While some of that time is a result of the economy not being able to absorb so many graduates at one time, much of it is a result of the fact that unemployed graduates simply do not simply how to look for a job.

    According to Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “Research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers has shown nearly 62 percent of graduating seniors either NEVER go to the career center, or will only visit once or twice.  It’s no wonder then that the average grad thinks the proper way to look for a job is to load their resume onto 100 websites and wait for someone to contact them!   We know, given the right knowledge and skills we can help an unemployed graduate find a job quicker.”

    Each author is offering three tips based on their niche area of expertise.  Graduates will learn relevant, contemporary strategies to create an elevator pitch, build their online brand, use social media to land a job, as well as learn traditional networking, resume, interviewing, and job search techniques.  Authors will share the importance of creating a career plan, managing their career, and staying current on job search strategies.   The authors will follow the TED Talk recommended presentation length which will provide graduates additional time to pose questions to authors.

    Event gives grads tools to improve resumes and skills in interviewing, networking and job search

    During each author’s presentation, time has been set aside to introduce graduates to innovative online career tools designed to improve their resumes, as well as their interviewing, networking and job search skills.  According to Rothberg, “Our firm and staff are concerned that college graduates are not receiving the knowledge and skills they will need for the dozen job searches they are expected to have by the time they turn 38 years old.   We are excited about the possibilities of putting thousands of dollars in the pockets of graduates by giving them simple insights on how they can not only find a job quicker, but help them launch and lead successful careers!”

    The cost to participate is only $33, but free to anyone who uses the authors promotion code of — CT –. Participation is limited!

    About Grad CareerFestival

    The Grad CareerFestival is produced by TalentMarks, a nationally recognized firm that provides scalable career and professional development programming to career centers, and alumni associations.   http://www.gradcareerfestival.com

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Each year, we help almost three million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities find seasonal, part-time, internship, and other entry-level jobs. College Recruiter is free to candidates as employers pay to advertise their job openings with us. At any given time, we have about 300,000 job postings and well over 40,000 pages of articles, blogs, videos, and other career-related content.  

    For details and interviews, contact [email protected]   800-849-1762 x 205

  • [video] How to negotiate offers: tips for discussing salary and benefits Part 1

    July 07, 2017 by

     

    Negotiating offers by discussing salary and benefits can be intimidating for an entry level job seeker. If you haven’t done your research, you won’t know what to ask for. When you are given a job offer, that is the moment when you have the most leverage to negotiate, so make sure you are prepared so you don’t miss the opportunity.

    College Recruiter spoke with Marky Stein, who consults Fortune 500 companies, presents at colleges and universities about career development, and is a bestselling author of career planning books. This is Part 1 of 2 of our conversation with Marky to hear her advice for entry level job seekers about negotiating salary and benefits. Here she provides tips for what to expect, how to prepare for negotiating and ideas for what to negotiate. Part 2 will continue the conversation and will address the gender pay gap and when to ask for a pay raise. Continue Reading

  • Sourcing and evaluation: Employers’ flawed assumptions, and how mobile recruiting changes everything

    June 28, 2017 by

     

    This blog is an excerpt of Steven Rothberg’s white paper, “How Employers Evaluate Career Services, Job Boards, and Other Sources, and How Mobile Recruiting Changes Everything.”

    Read the entire white paper here (no need to register to download).

    Few employers properly track candidate sources

    The technology that allows an advertiser to track a consumer from their click on an ad to the advertiser’s website, and ultimately to a purchase, has existed since the mid-1990’s. For example, when College Recruiter began using this technology in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click in return for driving thousands of students and recent graduates a month to apply on their career website. Continue Reading

  • Archived white papers from College Recruiter

    June 26, 2017 by

    College Recruiter regularly produces white papers that address challenges to the talent acquisition community, especially professionals hiring entry-level. Below you’ll find our archives. Enjoy!

     

    Fall college recruitment plansFall 2017 College Recruitment: Emerging trends and challenges. As the school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. NAS Recruitment Innovation and College Recruiter teamed up to provide insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs. We touch on applied tech skills, programmatic advertising, what students are looking for, diversity and much more.

    talent war means making happy teamsWinning the talent acquisition war in 2017: There has been a shift in tools and techniques used by employers to attract talent in light of advances in technology and business needs. An effective recruitment strategy should not only align with workforce plans, but also attract top performers. Employers need to respond to key trends when it comes to acquiring talent. This white paper addresses diversifying the workforce, use of analytics, hiring millennials, leveraging mobile technology and responding to the gig economy.

    Predictive analytics and interview biasPredictive analytics, bias and interviewing: For centuries, crystal ball gazers and fortune tellers promised to be able to predict the future. They played on our biases and gullibility, and counted on us attributing chance occurrences to their predictive powers. But predictive analytics gives us the ability to reduce uncertainty by applying statistics and determining the probabilities that future patterns will emerge in the behavior of people and systems. This white paper addresses privacy invasion, biases that impede truth, and what to do about bias.

    Finding game changer talentDon’t pass on game changer candidates who are still rookies: Game changers are high-impact hires who, soon after joining a team, end up completely transforming it. They quickly move beyond being just top performers because they can be further described using words like stunning, remarkable, exceptional, or extraordinary. Unfortunately, I frequently see recruiters and hiring managers pass over these extraordinary rookies. This white paper addresses identifying rookie game changer candidates.

    Evaluate sources effectivelyHow employers evaluate career services, job boards and other sources (And how mobile recruiting changes everything): When College Recruiter began using technology to track candidates who clicked “apply” in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click to drive thousands of students and grads to their career site. And yet today, few employers seem to properly track the sources of candidates who visit their career sites, let alone those who apply, are interviewed and get hired. This white paper addresses flawed assumptions about evaluating sources, and the solution.

     

  • Leveraging diversity: CEO Faith Rothberg presents 8 organizations who are succeeding [video and slides]

    June 21, 2017 by

     

    There are more men named John and David who run big companies than all the women who run big companies.

    College Recruiter CEO Faith Rothberg has a problem with this, and made a point of offering solutions at this year’s National Association of Colleges and Employers conference. In the video below, Rothberg highlights eight organizations who are leveraging diversity to impact their customer numbers, workplace culture and profitability.

    Watch Rothberg’s presentation, and find links to her examples below, along with major takeaways.

    Study after study prove the business case for gender diversity. Increased gender diversity positively impacts productivity, innovation, decision-making, and employee retention and satisfaction. In fact, companies with the highest rates of gender diversity make more than 13 times average sales revenue than companies with the lowest gender diversity. Similarly, those gender diverse companies pull in an average of 15,000 more customers.

    The amount of gender diversity varies by industry and role. Medical and health services managers, for example, are actually more likely to be women than men, as are human resources or social service managers. But only 36% of management occupations are filled with 50% women. That includes marketing and sales, operations, transportation, information systems and much more.

    Here are eight companies leading the way to increase gender diversity

    1. Aramark became a Catalyst partner of Women’s Foodservice Forum.
    2. Bank of America has invested in LEAD for Women, an employee resource group dedicated to women’s professional development. About half of managers and executive management team are women.
    3. Enterprise Rent-A-Car named Pamela Nicholson as CEO in 2013. She joined the company 32 years ago as a recent grad.
    4. Ernst & Young opens up dialogue between men and women via Inclusiveness Steering Committees, encouraging candid discussions about critical issues and experiences, and establishing mentoring and sponsorship initiatives. They’ve increased the number of women in top management by 20%.
    5. (Two orgs here): Goldman Sachs and U.S. Department of State partner to leverage the expertise of the public and private sectors to encourage inclusive economic growth in the Middle East and Northern Africa.
    6. IBM developed task forces that focus on understanding differences and finding ways to appeal to more employees and customers. Revenues from small and midsize businesses dominated by minority and female buyers increased from $10 million to $300 million.
    7. Quicken Loans routinely ranks among the best U.S. companies for both diversity and overall company culture. Women fill 45% of all jobs and 43% of management jobs.

    Takeaways from Rothberg:

    1. Diversity and inclusion goes beyond race. It includes ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, generation, disability, personality type, thinking style, and gender.
    2. Leverage that diversity to produce better products and services.
    3. Use variety of practices including mentoring, employee resource groups, multicultural talent management, strategic partnership development, and e-learning.
    4. Senior leaders must seek diversity, create inclusion, and drive accountability.
    5. Promote cognitive diversity. Embrace differing perspectives, interpretations. Overcome unconscious bias and culture that inhibits the sharing of different opinions.

    Download Rothberg’s PowerPoint slides here.

     

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email [email protected]