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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 24, 2019 by

5 Ways Small Businesses Can Compete for Top Talent in a Tight Job Market

When it comes to recruiting top talent, it’s always been a challenge for smaller businesses to compete with large, well-known companies. While large organizations have name recognition, big marketing budgets and fully-staffed departments dedicated to human resources and talent acquisition, smaller companies must find more creative ways to attract and retain high-quality candidates.

In today’s tight labor market, this challenge has become more formidable. Consider this: In June of this year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that there are 6.7 million jobs open in the U.S. and only 6.4 million available workers to fill them. Low unemployment coupled with a shortage of talent in many areas, has made hiring a tough job for companies of all sizes, but particularly for small- to mid-sized organizations.

According to a 2018 report from Vistage International, a peer mentoring organization for CEOs, business owners and executives of small- to mid-sized companies, 61% of small and mid-sized businesses expect to increase their workforce in the next 12 months. In addition, a recent CareerBuilder survey found that companies across the globe are looking to revamp their hiring efforts to fill both temporary and full-time positions in 2019. The same survey found that 44% of businesses are planning to hire full-time employees and 51% are planning to hire temporary employees. But roughly half of all the hiring managers surveyed said they are unable to fill much-needed positions due to a lack of qualified talent.

The heightened competition for talent has increased salaries and benefits across many industries, as well as the number of company perks. In this highly competitive environment, smaller companies, who are not able to offer the same type of compensation and benefits packages, must find other ways to grab the attention of job seekers and find the best candidates for open positions. Some proven strategies include:

1. Form Relationships with Candidates

The first step in forming relationships is to “get social.” Smaller businesses must have a strong presence on LinkedIn and other social media. A Pew Research Center survey found that 79% of Americans who were looking for work used the Internet to view job listings, learn about companies and apply for jobs. Of those, 34% said online resources were their most important tool.

It’s also important for small businesses to have a well-developed LinkedIn profile. These profiles are free and offer great exposure. They help candidates find businesses that they would otherwise never know about. LinkedIn also serves as a free resume database, allowing job seekers to search though hundreds of candidates and reach out to those who are a great match. Keep in mind, however, that LinkedIn is far more popular amongst Gen X’ers and Baby Boomers than Gen Z’ers and Millennials. LinkedIn’s own statistics indicate that only 1.5% of Gen Z’ers and Millennials use LinkedIn even on a monthly basis.

In addition, forming a relationship involves being more “hands on” throughout the recruiting process. Provide company updates or news and check in with candidates via a personal phone call or email. During the interview process, include executives and managers who may be working with this person. This shows the candidate that they’re valued enough for the CEO or other executives to take the time to speak with them.

To relate with younger candidates, it’s also important to adopt a mobile-enabled application process, which means that not only must it be possible to apply for a job using an Android or iPhone, but that it’s easy to do without having to use third-party services such as “Apply With LinkedIn.” Most candidates either don’t have those third-party services, don’t know how to use them, or don’t want to use them.

Mobile devices are increasingly becoming more entrenched in our everyday life, especially within younger populations. According to Glassdoor, 89% of job seekers say their mobile device is an important tool for job searching and 45% use it to search for jobs at least once a day.

2. Attend Networking Events and Job Fairs – and Seek Referrals

When you’re shopping for caviar, but you have a fast food budget, you must work harder to find candidates. Simple job postings rarely do the trick. Even with a small staff, it’s worth the time and effort to attend networking events and job fairs. While the big company names draw candidates to an event, it puts you in good company. Not only do these events expose you to candidates who don’t know who you are, it allows you to present your company “in person.” Talking with someone face-to-face and conveying your enthusiasm and passion for your workplace and the position are more effective than a job posting. Of course, that means sending the right person to represent your company at job fairs and other events! Make sure they’re representing your company in the best light possible.

A Jobvite Job Seeker Nation Study found that 39% of job seekers rated initial contact with a company as making the biggest impact on their impression of an organization. You can capitalize on this by presenting a friendly, but knowledgeable face at job fairs, taking the time to really get to know candidates and what they want, and following up with personalized emails – something that larger companies are unlikely to do.

Small businesses can also broaden their reach by working with the right partners, such as recruiting agencies, co-ops, chambers of commerce and professional networking groups, which may result in listings in professional directories and word-of-mouth referrals.

Finally, look inside your company. Your employees can be your most passionate advocates. In fact, research by Deloitte found that employee referrals are the number one way organizations find high-quality hires. Fifty-one percent of companies surveyed named employee referrals among their top three most effective sources. Let employees know you have open positions and encourage them to share job postings with family, friends and professional associates. You may also consider offering a small bonus to employees who recommend someone who is hired. Of course, the more you rely on referrals, the less diverse your workforce will be — and numerous studies prove that diverse workforces are more productive.

3. Build and Maintain College Campus Relationships

The first step in working with colleges is to carefully research which schools are the best fit for your organization — including majors, quality of programs, student population, school location, etc. Once selected, the most successful university relations and recruiting programs take a long-term approach, building and maintaining relationships. Work closely with the career center staff to learn about a college’s culture, student demographics, degree programs and traditions. Then take it a step further by getting to know other key contacts, including faculty and administrators.

Even when your company is not hiring, be sure to maintain these relationships. Look for ways to stay involved: Can you offer a co-op or internship program (internships are a highly-effective way to find full-time hires and increase retention)? Can you volunteer to help with mock interviews or critiquing resumes? Can you speak to students about skills that employers are looking for?

Another factor to consider is whether you need to target candidates by which school they attend (or attended) at all. A rapidly increasing minority of employers, both large and small, are using workforce productivity data and discovering that the college an employee attended is poorly correlated (and sometimes even negatively correlated) with the productivity of the employee. Why? Reasons vary, but one explanation is that those who graduate from elite schools rarely stay with their first employer for as long as those who graduated from second- or third-tier schools.

If you want a diverse, inclusive and productive workforce, you should supplement your on-campus recruiting efforts with so-called virtual recruiting efforts, which typically means advertising your part-time, seasonal, internship and entry-level jobs on sites like College Recruiter that primarily target students and recent graduates of all one-, two- and four-year colleges and universities.

4. Promote Company Culture

When you can’t compete with compensation, you can still attract top talent by promoting your company’s culture and perks. The good news for small businesses is that competitive wages aren’t the only thing that can attract employees. Younger workers consider overall culture to be a major contributor to job satisfaction, according to a Society for Human Resource Management survey.

You may not be able to offer a fully-stocked kitchen and exercise rooms ala Google, but flexible work hours, remote work options, monthly workplace events, professional development courses, community-involvement and other perks can be very attractive to the right candidates.

According to a 2018 study by SCORE, a business mentoring network in the U.S., employee perks not only attract better, more qualified employees, but they are also such a powerful selling point that they can boost employee retention and job satisfaction levels. In fact, SCORE reports that benefits and perks in the workplace are often more important to employees than higher pay. The percentage of employees who took the following perks/benefits into account when choosing an employer were:

  • Flexible hours – 88%
  • More vacation time – 80%
  • Work-from-home options – 80%
  • Student loan assistance – 48%
  • Free gym membership – 39%
  • Free snacks – 32%
  • Weekly free outings – 24%

If you offer special perks, be sure to promote them. A great way to do that is to include video in your marketing efforts. A small number of job boards, including College Recruiter, not only allow you to include video within your job postings, but even let you do so for free!

5. Highlight Intangible Benefits

There are many benefits to working with a smaller company, such as greater flexibility, more diversity in day-to-day responsibilities, less bureaucracy, closer relationships, teamwork and the opportunity to make a direct impact on the bottom line. These benefits can be particularly attractive to younger workers who value “hands on” work that results in meaningful contributions from the get-go.

In addition, top talent is drawn to companies that are innovative and offer opportunities to grow and learn. You can use this to your advantage by talking about how candidates won’t be “boxed in” by a role, as happens within many large organizations. The nimble nature of small companies allows employees to wear many hats, which can be very appealing and can often compensate for a lower salary.

Today’s candidates have far more power during the job search and are also job hopping more than ever before. To succeed in this candidate-oriented job market, it’s important for small businesses to develop innovative recruiting and hiring strategies to fuel growth.

Sources:
“Best Practices for Recruiting New College Graduates,” by Mimi Collins, National Association of Colleges and Employers, NACE, October 13, 2017.
“Recruitment Statistics 2018: Trends & Insights in Hiring Talented Candidates,” TalentNow.com, February 2, 2018.
Vistage International, 2018 CEO Report on Business Growth
“What’s More Important at Work: Better Perks and Benefits or a Higher Salary,” Biospace, June 27, 2018.
“7 Tips for Small Businesses Competing with Large Employers for Talent,” Collegeforamerica,com, Workforce Insights, June 28, 2017.

Posted May 13, 2019 by

Salary Statistics and What They Mean to You

First, the good news: The unemployment rate in the U.S. is the lowest it’s been since 2001, and the percentage of prime working age adults who are employed is the highest it’s been since 2008.1 Though this improvement in the job market hasn’t been consistent across all industries, job functions and regions, there appears to be an overall improvement.

While this is undoubtedly positive for both graduates seeking jobs and the economy, it presents a few challenges for agencies and employers, particularly small to mid-sized companies. Many positions are getting harder to fill and candidates now have more choices, and therefore, increased bargaining power, often giving larger employers an advantage.

Though location, benefits, flexible hours and work environment are important factors in a career decision, salary is still ranked as the most important influence. A recent survey by Glassdoor shows that 67 percent of job seekers pay attention to salary when scanning job ads, more than any other piece of information on a position.

With that in mind, we’ve gathered some statistics on average starting salaries for 2018 graduates to help with your recruiting efforts this year.

Average Starting Salary Projections by Discipline/Bachelor’s Degree for the Class of 20181

1. Engineering $66,521 +less than 1% over last year
2. Computer Science $66,005 +less than 1% over last year
3. Math & Sciences $61,867 (Physics – $69,900) +4.2% over last year
4. Business $56,720 (Marketing – $62,634) +3.5% over last year
5. Social Sciences $56,689 +6% over last year
6. Humanities $56,688 +16.3% over last year
7. Agricultures & Natural Resources $53,565 no information available
8. Communications $51,448 -less than 1% versus last year

 

According to NACE’s Winter 2018 Salary Survey report, students earning engineering, computer science, and math and science degrees are not only expected to be the highest-paid graduates at the bachelor’s-degree level but will also be in the highest demand.

WHAT’S LOCATION GOT TO DO WITH IT?

While an entry-level Software Engineer in the San Francisco Bay area can expect an average salary of $109,3502, the same position in Michigan has an average starting salary of $64,544.3 This is just one example of the often-sizable differences you’ll find in salaries based on geography. As you might expect, the two major factors that determine these variations are demand and cost-of-living.

States with the highest cost-of-living, such as Washington D.C. and California must adjust salaries upward in order to provide “livable compensation” and attract talent, while states with lower cost-of-living, such as Mississippi and Arkansas will typically offer less in for the same position.

States with the Highest Cost-of-Living

  1. Hawaii
  2. Washington D.C.
  3. New York
  4. California
  5. New Jersey
  6. Maryland
  7. Connecticut
  8. Massachusetts
  9. Alaska
  10. New Hampshire

Source: The Motley Fool, “15 States with the Highest Cost of Living,”
Christy Bieber, July 5, 2018.

Demand for a particular job also affects salaries. In fact, job availability is a major factor for candidates when determining where to live. Based on research by U.S. World News and Report, the states with the highest overall job growth are:

  1. Hawaii
  2. North Dakota
  3. Colorado
  4. Utah
  5. New Hampshire
  6. Nebraska
  7. Minnesota
  8. Iowa
  9. Massachusetts
  10. Wisconsin

Of course, these rankings refer to overall employment. Demand for specific jobs may differ by state, as well. For example, web developers and solar panel installers are in high demand in California, while Ohio is looking for more registered nurses to fill open positions.                            


SAME OCCUPATION, DIFFERENT PAY?

In addition to geography, the salary for a particular job can differ dramatically. The most obvious reason is that no job is exactly the same, even if a position has a similar job title. Variations in job responsibilities, company size and requirements all impact pay for jobs within the same occupation. The wider the variations, the greater the salary ranges. Some of the factors that affect salaries in the same occupation include:

Education/credentials: In many cases, jobs that require advanced degrees or professional certification earn more than others in the same occupation who don’t expect these credentials. Employers who require more credentials typically offer higher salaries, even when the job title is the same.

Experience and skill: In general, the longer someone does a job, the more productive he or she becomes and can, therefore, command a higher salary for their expertise. Candidates who have in-demand skills also may earn more.

Industry or employer: Salaries for the same or similar job titles often vary by industry and employer due to working conditions, type of clientele, training requirements, and demand.

Job responsibilities: Not all Marketing Managers are created equal! There are wide variations in job responsibilities under certain job titles. In major corporations, for instance, this position may require managing a large department and a very generous budget, while smaller enterprises will have fewer people to oversee, smaller budgets and comparatively less responsibilities.

Competition and performance: Some occupations are extremely competitive, and therefore, must offer higher salaries to attract the most successful employees. Workers whose pay depends on their job performance also might have very high wages.

The occupations with the biggest differences in salaries/wages are:4

  • Arts, entertainment and sports
  • Healthcare
  • Management
  • Sales, business, and financial
  • Science, math, and engineering

As you look to recruit talent in 2019 and beyond, knowing what salary to offer based on your industry, job demand, geography and job requirements can help you attract and place the best candidates for every position.


1National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), 2018 Winter Salary Survey
2PayScale, 2018.
3Indeed.com, 2018.
4U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018.

Posted April 30, 2019 by

How to Land That Interview: Advice From the Experts

Whether you’re responding to the perfect job posting or sending queries out to companies on your “dream list,” we want you to get the consideration you deserve. So, we asked our panel of experts for their advice on how job seekers can make their cover letter and resume stand out from the crowd and land an interview.

(Please note, while there are some varying perspectives on certain aspects of the resume and cover letter, there are also some clear consistencies from our experts – just as there will be for different hiring managers.)

RESUMES THAT RESONATE

Pam Baker, Founder and CEO, Journeous:

An important thing to remember is that your resume can and should be tailored to the opportunity, while your LinkedIn profile will be a more generalized view of who you are and your experience. You want it to be easy for a recruiter to spend the 5-7 seconds they’re likely to use on scanning your resume to say “yes, this person is worth talking to.”

Adapt your objective/summary to reflect the focus of the job you’re interested in. Review the order of the bullets listed under your experience to list those that are most relevant to this job at the top. If you have specific training that allows you to stand out for this role, make sure it’s highlighted and easy to see. Lastly, make sure to start your bullets with what you accomplished, followed by how you accomplished it and not the reverse. Far too many bullets on resumes start with the “how” and list the results at the end. At this stage, you need to grab the recruiter/interviewer’s attention FAST. 

For example, instead of saying: “Managed project to generate corporate donations for track team, doubling prior year’s total from $3,500 to $7,000,” say: “Doubled corporate donations to $7,000 for track team sponsorship by (how you did what you did)…” 

Alexandra Levit, Chairperson of DeVry University Career Board Business/Workplace Author, Speaker, Consultant, and Futurist Managing Partner, PeopleResults:

Look closely at the job description and determine what specific skills the company is looking for and what achievements they want to see from a candidate, and then tailor your resume to fit that criteria. When you describe your previous experience, make sure it relates to the job you are applying for. Employers want to minimize risk, so you need to assure them that you’ve already succeeded in these areas.

These days, objectives are not necessary. If you do include an objective, again, make sure you customize it for each position that you are applying for.

Finally, be concise. A resume should tell a cohesive story about your experiences/job history in 30 seconds. If you’ve had a long career, be selective about what you include on your resume. You don’t have to list every experience.      

Jeff Dunn, Intel Campus Relations Manager:

It’s all about targeting. For instance, a Computer Engineer has both hardware and software coursework and skills. For a software position, she needs to modify her objective – her “relevant” coursework and the class projects she lists – to be targeted for those skill sets.

In addition, make sure to include quantitative results/numbers in the resume whenever possible. Most resumes simply list tasks that do not demonstrate quality of work.

Joanne Meehl, MS, IJCDC, Joanne Meehl Career Services:

Job seekers should have a 3-4-line “Summary” at the top of page one of their resume that in short, snappy phrases mentions various points about them that match the job description – not only matches the posting itself, but shows an understanding of what the role AND career path require. It should also say something about who you are. College seniors can get this “inside information” about the career by talking with people who DO the job they want. This section should be real for the applicant, not made up for this one job. Here’s an example for an entry level Analyst position, by a client of mine who was a college senior when he wrote it, slightly edited for anonymity. (It worked):

New Analyst with big-picture business mindset. Relishes synthesizing data and doing research. Trusted by peers and managers during three pressured yet very productive Big Data internships. Self-driven, non-entitled, competitive, responsive, with a problem-solving attitude. Deeply interested in analytics, budgeting, operations. Speaks near-fluent Spanish and French. Willing to travel.                                    

COVER LETTERS THAT GET CONSIDERATION

Pam Baker:

While in truth I find that cover letters aren’t consistently read, when they are read, they offer an opportunity to go beyond the resume, which addresses the “what” and speaks to the “why” in your cover letter. WHY are you the best candidate for the job? WHY do you want this role? A resume is written in the third person; your cover letter is written in first person and gives you a chance to connect with the reader by making yourself memorable for who you are, beyond just what you’ve done. 

Alexandra Levit:

Again, you should customize your cover letter to the position, highlighting the areas of expertise that the employer is looking for. It’s also important to be concise in your cover letter. Tell your story succinctly and provide quantitative results whenever possible.

If possible, find a direct contact at the company and send your information to that person. Communicating directly with the hiring manager versus someone in HR can ensure that you won’t get lost in the system. With everything being automated these days, it’s more difficult to stand out and get attention from the right person within an organization.

Jeff Dunn:

A brief cover letter has more impact than a full page that I don’t have the time to read. For example, “I have spoken to several of your company employees, and I believe that the Digital Design Engineer is a good match with my Electrical Engineering coursework and successful team projects. The best times to reach me are the afternoons. I look forward to speaking with you.”

Joanne Meehl:

Again, any examples you can provide would be appreciated. Cover letters are read by some on the hiring side, despite what some people in companies say about never reading them, so do one. Do a “match up” of “what you need” (the employer’s needs) and “how I meet that need,” with examples of your successes from internships, activities, jobs, volunteer work.

The salutation should not sound like a lawyer wrote it, so don’t use “To Whom it May Concern.” A better choice would be “Good Day.” Use the first paragraph to tell them what position they have that you fit and that your resume is attached. Include the job number if one is given.

The next paragraph should tell them why you want the job and why you want to work for them. Here’s where you say you’re interested “because of (the company’s name) cutting-edge leadership” or other statement that’s personal to you. This kind of statement reveals the research you’ve done to choose the company. Most job seekers don’t bother with research, so your cover letter/email and resume will rise above the rest on this aspect alone.

Now, the killer paragraph! Show them you understand their pain; this is so much more powerful than saying one more time, “I have X-years of experience in this field…” This introduces the section where you clearly show how you match the job. I recommend that you show the company how you match the advertised job, point for point. Choose your 4-5 strongest attributes that match their requirements.

Finally, the last paragraph should be a call for action, such as “I would appreciate the opportunity to speak with you regarding this position.” If you say you will contact them by a certain date, be sure to follow-up when you say you will! Use your email signature – meaning all your contact information. Make it easy for them to contact you.

MORE TIPS FOR GETTING THAT INTERVIEW

Pam Baker:

Make use of your network! Who do you know who works in the industry/company/type of job you’re interested in? Family friends, alumni, past coworkers, people you were in volunteer roles with? People typically want to help, so don’t hesitate to reach out. Let them know why you’re doing so and ask for 15 minutes of their time. Then plan out 3-4 questions you want input on, so you can show interviewers you’ve done your homework and know what makes a great candidate. For example, you might want to know what some of the qualities are that this company looks for. Or you might want to find out what skills set someone apart in this type of role. Or maybe it’s useful to get a sense of the type of work someone with your degree could do in this industry or company. You might ask if they know anything about the recruiting or hiring team – and if they know you well enough (e.g., they’ve worked with you before on a project, volunteer role, in a work capacity) you could ask them to put in a good word for you. People who are recommended by someone in their network are at least 3-4 times more likely to get hired! So, doing some up-front research on who might be able to help is well worth your time. 

Alexandra Levit:

I agree with Pam. It’s important to make a personal connection if possible. Try to target someone who is directly involved in the area you are applying for. Also, be sure to follow up after you’ve submitted your resume. A good rule-of-thumb is three touchpoints within a six-week period. I suggest starting with an email, then a second email, and finally a phone call. If you don’t get a response after that, let it go. When you’re communicating with the company/contact, show enthusiasm for the company and the position – Why do you want this job? What makes you excited about working with this company? What aspects of the position are appealing?

Jeff Dunn:

If possible, follow up with an employee who can get your resume to the hiring manager, in case they don’t find your resume in the database.

Finally, show some evidence of “people skills” in addition to your functional skills (leadership, communication skills, adaptability, ownership, initiative, etc.). While these are subjective, including some will personalize your resume. You can give examples when you land the interview.

Joanne Meehl:

Show some excitement for the company, the role/position, and your career choice. Don’t make this a sterile exercise about “skills,” but expand from skills to show how you enjoy the nature of the work and that you’re planning to be doing it for many years because it’s so fascinating to you. Even if you’re a future (very sedate) accountant, show some FIRE for the work! This will demonstrate that you are serious about the career AND will distinguish you from other grads.

To learn more about the College Recruiter panel of experts, click HERE.

Posted February 09, 2019 by

Selecting and Qualifying the Right Job Board Partners

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” – Napolean Hill

Mission Possible

Many companies craft mission statements that help guide the way they do business and create a certain company culture. Unfortunately, surveys show that these statements have very little influence on how many companies actually do business.

According to Wikipedia, a mission statement is intended to “guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path and the framework or context within which the company’s strategies are formulated.” That sounds noble – and even essential – for a successful company, and yet, in the daily hustle to meet customer needs, hit business targets and respond to competitive threats, these “guiding principles” are often the first things to slip. So, we understand why many people are skeptical about their value.

However, research also shows that the most successful companies are those that have teams focused around a common purpose and have deeply socialized guiding principles. They accomplish this by putting them into practice every day instead of letting them gather dust in a binder or simply serve as wall decorations.

What’s more, the most outstanding companies have “outward facing” principles, which means they have guidelines not just for creating a positive corporate culture, but also for how they interact with their customers. When deciding on a supplier or vendor, for any aspect of your business, including job boards and other recruitment vendors, it’s important to understand what motivates them and guides their actions.

Partnerships vs. Suppliers

For the most part, the “supplier-customer” relationship is straightforward. The supplier provides the product or service that the customer needs. And, the customer chooses a supplier based on price, features, quality, service levels, etc. But what if we take this relationship to the next level?

For instance, instead of viewing a recruitment services vendor as simply a supplier of candidates, begin to think of them as your partner – someone who is striving to help your business succeed by providing the right candidates for the right positions. In order to do this effectively, the vendor needs to know more than just the job description. They must understand the company/industry, the culture, the challenges, the “real” requirements, and more. This necessitates a partnership.

The difference between a supplier and a true partner is that partnerships are built through:

  • Transparency, candor, and empathy – There is trust, which is built on open, honest communications and a desire to understand your business and its needs.
  • Collaboration – Which requires active listening in order to discover how to bring more value to the relationship and tailor services to meet client needs.
  • Accountability – Partners want to exceed expectations, provide measurable results and offer performance guarantees.

Creating Value for our Partners

Let’s face it, one-way relationships are not very fulfilling. At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And, we believe that a strong partnership with our customers must be two-way – with each party holding the other accountable for upholding their side of the “bargain” We understand that establishing mutually beneficial relationships with our partners – whether they are employers, advertising agencies, recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) organizations or universities – is critical to our success and yours.

“We think you’ll find working with College Recruiter to be like a breath of fresh air,” said Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer. “We believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience, and we’re passionate about the customer experience. We want to be more than just a ‘supplier’ – we sincerely want to form a lasting partnership with those we work with.”

At College Recruiter, we value:

  • Honesty and integrity
  • Enthusiasm, tenacity, and fun
  • Unparalleled customer experiences
  • Critical thinking and problem solving
  • Teamwork and collaboration
  • Continuous improvements

Doesn’t that sound like a company you’d like to partner with? Of course, actions speak louder than words. That’s why we stand behind our job postings, targeted emails, mobile banners, and display banner ads, and guarantee results for clients. From our management team and advisory board to our content panel and our employees, we select people who share our values. And, whether its targeted emails or job postings, branding campaigns or diversity solutions, College Recruiter delivers for our partners.

In fact, we have a long list of client partners that love us! Listen to what they have to say:

“We run job posting ads on a lot of sites but had never used College Recruiter until we purchased an unlimited job posting package a month ago. We were amazed at the high quantity and quality of responses that we received. After only two days, we had a positive return on our investment for the entire month.” –Leapforce, Inc.

“The support that you provide is outstanding. Thanks!” — Recruitment Center, Central Intelligence Agency

“We’ve tried several ways to recruit college students for our entry-level positions including job postings on other leading college job boards. None worked well so we were skeptical when first approached by College Recruiter… (Your) approach in having the job posted to our area rather than to a handful of schools proved to generate far more responses than the postings on the other sites…it really works!!!!” — Sequoia Financial

“College Recruiter has been working as a great resource for our Talent Acquisition team! Our inbox has been flooded with applications from quality candidates, a bit overwhelming but we will take it!” — University Relations and Recruiting Coordinator, HGST, a Western Digital Company

“I was completely blown away by College Recruiter’s data and analytics.” — Kara Yarnot, member of College Recruiter’s board of advisors and former head of talent acquisition for SAIC and college relations for Boeing

Making a Match

At the risk of sounding cliché, finding the right job board partner can be a bit like dating. You have basic requirements, but since a great recruiter needs to know your company or agency quite intimately, there are other aspects to consider when forming a partnership, such as:

  • Is there chemistry?
  • Do their values align with yours?
  • Are they well-managed and ethical?
  • Do they listen more than they talk? (No one likes a date who talks about himself/herself all night!)
  • Are they responsive?
  • Do they offer any type of guarantees?
  • Are they willing to offer references or direct contact with other customers?

Whether you work with College Recruiter or another job board, be sure to find the right fit for you. This will not only lead to a higher quantity and quality of applicants but also savings in both time and money over the long-term.

If you’d like to connect and talk about partnerships opportunities, visit http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/home or call 952-848-2211.

 

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

Posted January 10, 2019 by

The Do’s and Don’ts of Hiring Part-Time, Temporary and Seasonal Workers

 

Whether a company needs seasonal workers to handle summer tourism, part-time help to meet increased demand during the holidays, or temporary employees to cover a short-term vacancy, acquiring additional support can be both a blessing and a curse. Part-time, temporary and seasonal employees can alleviate stress on full-time employees, improve productivity and keep customers satisfied. However, these hires can also be a headache for companies due to additional liabilities for payroll and HR departments – and if not handled correctly, can negatively impact your company. How can you make this process more productive than painful?

UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCES

The first issue to consider is the proper classification of employees. There are requirements under the law on how different types of employees should be treated, so it’s important to understand how each employment status is defined.

Part-time Employees – Most states define part-time employees as those who work less than 35 hours per week, compared to full-time employees who typically work at least 40 hours per week. Part-time employees are usually paid on an hourly basis. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), part-time employees are treated the same as full-time employees when it comes to minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor. They are also covered under OSHA’s safety and health policies concerning work-related injuries, illnesses and occupational fatalities. Additionally, part-time employees who work 1,000 hours or more during a calendar year may be eligible for retirement benefits under the Employee Retirement Security Act (ERISA).

While part-time employees must comply with company rules and policies, they generally receive limited or no company benefits, such as health benefits, vacation and sick days, paid holidays and unemployment compensation, among others, unless required by state labor laws and/or individual company policies. In today’s more competitive environment, many companies are extending benefits such as paid sick days and holidays to part-time employees to attract and retain qualified employees.

Temporary Employees – Temporary employees, sometimes referred to as “temps,” are typically hired to cover for absent employees (such as those who are on maternity or disability leave) and temporary vacancies, or to fill gaps in a company’s workforce. Temporary employees may be hired directly or through a temporary staffing agency, in which case the temp is “on lease” with the staffing company and not an employee of the company that uses its services. Temporary agencies typically charge clients 15 to 30% more than the amount of compensation given to the temporary employee, though some temp employees may wish to negotiate their hourly rate.

In some cases, temporary jobs may lead to permanent employment, in which case the agency may charge a fee. More often, companies hire temporary workers for a specific purpose while avoiding the cost of hiring regular employees.

Temporary employees may work full or part-time. Although they are not usually eligible for company benefits, some agencies offer health care and other benefits to their temps.

Depending on the state, temporary employees may have rights regarding federal discrimination and harassment claims, as well as other claims. In some circumstances, temporary employees may claim rights under the Family Medical Leave Act, which provides the right to take a leave of absence while taking care of a child, sick spouse, or elderly parent.

Seasonal Employees – When companies need extra help during a particular time period, such as the holidays, they rely on seasonal employees. Seasonal employees are usually hired on a part-time basis, but some may work full-time.

Like part-time employees, seasonal workers must be treated equally under FLSA regarding minimum wage, overtime, recordkeeping, workplace safety and health policies.

While this provides a general overview of employment status, there are laws concerning employee treatment, benefits, and policies of part-time, temporary, or seasonal employees that vary by each state. Therefore, it’s advisable to check your state’s specific employment laws before making these hires. (add link to DOL – https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/state.htm)

The employer needs to ensure that each employee is classified correctly and placed on the appropriate payroll. It’s important to complete paperwork correctly the first time in order to avoid problems down the road. For example, if you don’t withhold the correct amount of taxes the company will be responsible for refunding 100% of the owed taxes, plus additional fees and interest on the owed amount. The employer is also responsible for including temporary and seasonal employees’ wages in payroll taxes and filings. Filing correctly will save you from extra paperwork and penalties.

PROVIDE PROPER ONBOARDING AND TRAINING

Let’s begin with the tale of two hospitality companies. Company A views hiring seasonal employees as a necessary evil during the height of their tourist season. They usually wait until the last minute to start the hiring process, and because things are so hectic during this time of year, they scrimp on onboarding and training to save time. The result is high turnover, low productivity and an increase in customer service complaints.

Meanwhile, Company B gears up for the busy season by planning ahead and scooping up the best candidates. They have formal onboarding and training procedures that have been fine-tuned over the years with feedback from seasonal employees and their managers. These hires do not start working in any capacity, especially interacting with customers, before finishing the required training course. The result is low turnover, higher productivity, repeat hires that reduces recruitment efforts and time bringing them up to speed, and satisfied customers.

The moral of these stories is that part-time, temporary or seasonal employees deserve the same level of commitment and training as full-time employees. After all, you never know when one of these hires will become a full-time member of your team. Even if that never happens, these employees can have a big impact on your business in terms of productivity, culture, customer service and company reputation.

Employers can set them up for success with an onboarding process that includes:

  • A full orientation that covers all company policies and procedures, as well as your expectations regarding their performance and accountability.
  • Training that provides the knowledge an employee needs to do a good job and make valuable contributions. Training should also encompass any safety issues that apply to the position.
  • Matching the new hire with a peer buddy, who can help them build a social network, encourage open dialogue and help with questions/issues in a timely manner. Having a buddy to keep a close eye on a new hire can also head off potential problems before they occur.
  • Regular check-ins with a manager/supervisor.
  • A formal introduction to the entire team, when possible.

If part-time, temporary or seasonal workers do not feel like part of the team or become frustrated by the lack of knowledge and necessary tools to get the job done, it’s highly likely they will leave after a few days, putting you back to square one. During their short tenure with your company, they may cause more harm than good by interacting negatively with other employees and/or customers. Finally, in today’s world of social media, dissatisfied hires can tarnish your company’s reputation with a single scathing tweet.
 

Top 5 Reasons Seasonal and Temporary Employees Quit

While full-time employees typically cite reasons such as “lack of opportunity for advancement” or “a poor relationship with my boss” for leaving a company, seasonal hires and temps aren’t with a company long enough for these issues to come into play. With these employees, the most common reasons for quitting a job (usually after a very short time period) are:

  1. I don’t understand what I need to do (lack of training).
  2. There is no one available to help me or answer questions (lack of supervision).
  3. The work is boring or meaningless.
  4. The pay is not worth the amount of work required.
  5. I found a better job.

IMMERSE HIRES IN YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

Company culture can not only help you retain talented full-time employees, but also attract and keep part-time, temporary and seasonal hires. Numerous studies show that employees at every level become more invested and engaged with a company when there is a positive culture. What exactly does this mean? Culture can be defined as “a blend of the values, beliefs, taboos, symbols, rituals and myths all companies develop over time.”

In other words, culture is the company’s personality. It might include the company’s mission, expectations, work environment, management style and community involvement. No matter how you define it, there is a strong link between culture and employee turnover, which affects productivity and success.

A Columbia University study shows that the likelihood of job turnover at an organization with a rich company culture is just 13.9 percent, compared to 48.4 percent in companies with poor cultures. The reason for this is simple: unhappy employees don’t tend to do more than the minimum, great workers who don’t feel appreciated quit, and poor managers negatively affect workers and productivity.

In his Harvard Business Review blog post, “Transform Your Employees Into Passionate Advocates,” Rob Markey states: “Loyal, passionate employees bring a company as much benefit as loyal, passionate customers. They stay longer, work harder, work more creatively and find ways to go the extra mile. They bring you more great employees. And that spreads even more happiness for employees, for customers and for shareholders.”

In fact, it literally pays to keep employees happy! The Department of Economics at the University of Warwick found that happy workers are 12 percent more productive than the average worker and unhappy workers are 10 percent less productive.

Therefore, it’s important to make sure all employees, including part-time, temporary and seasonal hires, are happy and engaged by immersing them into your company’s culture. A positive company culture can also help you with your recruiting efforts by making you stand out from the crowd.

AVOID COMMON MISTAKES

One of the most frequent mistakes companies make when hiring seasonal employees is waiting too long to begin the recruitment process. Ideally, you want to make sure there is adequate staff in place before a busy period starts or a temporary vacancy begins. This gives the company time to onboard and train employees properly. Don’t assume that you’ll be able to fill positions quickly, even if you’ve had success in past years. It’s best to have a detailed plan in place that includes when the process will start, as well as where and how you’ll recruit – which brings us to another common mistake…

Don’t rely solely on one or two recruiting methods. This limits the quality and diversity of your applicant pool and could increase the time it takes to fill positions. Consider recruitment methods that target your “ideal applicants,” such as college students. Try cultivating relationships with local universities so they feel inclined to refer top candidates. Also, remember that employee referrals are the gold standard! Ask people in your organization if they know anyone who may be interested.

Finally, avoid relaxing your hiring standards for seasonal or temporary employees. While their tenure may be short, the impact they have your company can be lasting. Employ the same methods you use to ensure a great full-time hire, including a well-written job description, careful review of applications and/or resumes, thorough interviews, references and background checks. Think of this extra effort as an investment in your company and its future.

THINK LONG-TERM

Speaking of the future, hiring quality workers for a temporary vacancy or busy season can give you a pool of qualified candidates to call upon when you need them. Similarly, hiring talented part-time employees increases the likelihood of them becoming valuable full-time team members when the need arises. In fact, companies can reduce the costs and efforts of recruiting by encouraging good seasonal or temp workers to return during the following season or the next time a vacancy needs to be filled. To ensure that employees leave on a positive note, don’t forget to:

Provide feedback – Like regular employees, part-timers, temps and seasonal hires need regular feedback. You may also want to consider offering incentives, such as a small bonus or pay raise for employees who exceed expectations.

Conduct an exit interview – Just because an employee is only with you for a short time doesn’t mean he or she can’t provide valuable insights. Exit interviews give you a chance to learn about potential problems and fix them or reinforce positive policies and procedures. Exit interviews can also help avoid a negative review about your company: If an employee had a bad experience, allowing them to “be heard” may negate their desire to vent their frustration online.

Some questions to consider include:

  1. What did you like most and least about your job?
  2. What would you change about your job, your team or the company as a whole?
  3. Were you trained properly and given the direction you needed to do your job?
  4. Were you comfortable talking to your manager or supervisor about issues?
  5. Did you feel like a valued part of the team/company?
  6. Would you recommend the company to a friend looking for a job? If not, why?

From proper planning and recruiting efforts, to thoughtful onboarding, training and management, it pays to devote the time and resources to finding and retaining quality part-time, temporary and seasonal employees. These folks can have a positive impact on your company’s performance, culture and reputation, both now and in the future.
 

Sources:

“Guidelines for Hiring Part Time, Seasonal and Temporary Employees,” Optimum HRIS.
“It Really Pays to Have a Rich Company Culture,” Entrepreneur, 2016.
“Part time, temporary, and seasonal employees,” FindLaw, 2018.
“The Importance of Seasonal Exit Interviews,” by Christin Nein, Coal March Productions, 2017.
The U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, 2018.