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  • Panel of Experts provides ongoing insight to College Recruiter

    Growing your business or career

    College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts brings together expert voices from around the country with insight around entry level talent acquisition—both from the employer’s perspective and the job seeker’s. Members of the panel have decades of experience in advising human resources or job seekers, and are recognized experts in their fields. They specialize in workforce solutions, best practices in diversity, university relations, internships, interviewing, resume writing, career development and more.

    At College Recruiter we believe that every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We are excited to offer their deep insight to our readers and followers, who we believe will learn how to apply best practices to their own hiring approaches or job searches. Every month we will share a discussion with members of the Panel of Experts. Watch the videos, read the blog posts, and find all archived discussions on  LinkedIn for recruiters, LinkedIn for job seekers, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

    Members of the panel:
    Martin EdmondsonMartin Edmondson, Chief Executive at Gradcore. At Gradcore, Martin specializes in graduate recruitment, employment and employability, with the aim of maximizing graduate potential for organisations, universities and places. Martin has a wide range of experience and skills, gained from working across the public, private and third sectors.

    Marky Stein, Fortune 100 Career Consultant. Marky Stein career consultantMarky is the author of “Fearless Interviewing”, named the #1 interviewing book of the “100 Best Career Books of All Time” by onlinecollege.com. Her book “From Freshman to Fortune 500: 7 Secrets to Success for Grads, Undergrads and Career Changers” is due May 2017.

    Alexandra Levit career consultantAlexandra Levit, Consultant for all things workplace. Alexandra Levit’s goal is to prepare organizations and their employees for meaningful careers in the future workplace. A former nationally syndicated columnist for the Wall Street Journal and writer for the New York Times, Fast Company, and Forbes, Alexandra has authored several books, including the international bestseller “They Don’t Teach Corporate in College.”

    Joanne Meehl career consultant

    Joanne Meehl, MS, IJCDC, CPPA, Career Strategy Coach and President and primary Job Coach at Joanne Meehl Career Services. Joanne helps leaders market themselves for their next roles. She talks with hiring managers, internal and external recruiters, and HR directors about what they want. She translates this knowledge into guidance for her clients. She positions herself to her clients as a partner who gets her clients to decide and focus, see their own value, and communicate who they are in order to land the job they choose.  

    Janine Truitt talent consultantJanine Truitt, Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations. She is an entrepreneur, mentor, coach, speaker, blogger and brand influencer. She provides innovative, on-demand services, trainings, media and products that arm businesses with the timely knowledge and tools they need to succeed. She inspires individuals from the c-suite to stay-at-home moms to recognize and utilize their full potential by nudging them beyond their comfort zones and providing a practical way to achieve success.

    Vicky Oliver career consultantVicky Oliver, Author of award-winning career development books. Her career advice has been featured in over 901 media outlets, including the New York Times Job Market section, Wall Street Journal, New York Post, and Esquire magazine. She has been interviewed on over 601 radio programs. Her first book, “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions” (Sourcebooks, 2005), is a national bestseller in its third U.S. printing.

    Toni Newborn diversity managerToni Newborn, J.D., Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at City of St. Paul. She is currently serving as the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager for the City. In this role, she manages the consulting services division as well as create strategic plans to diversify the city’s work force from a racial equity lens.

    Bruce Soltys university recruiting

     

    Bruce Soltys, Director of University Relations at Travelers.  He Leads a team accountable for the design and delivery of the enterprise strategy for sourcing, attracting and recruiting a pool of diverse candidates through relationships with targeted colleges, universities, and student organizations across the country.

    Jeff DunnJeff Dun campus relations manager at Intel, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation.  Jeff has over 20 years of corporate recruiting experience.  He is a regular speaker on college campuses on successful job search strategies. He specializes in helping students with resume, networking, interviewing, LinkedIn and Branding strategies.

  • Lisa Orrell Happy to Be a Part of CollegeRecruiter.com’s Ask the Experts Panel

    Lisa Orrell of the Orrell Group has not only graciously agreed to contribute to the CollegeRecruiter.com Ask the Experts blog, she has also spoken out in full support of it. Check out her press release below:
    Popular Blog Offering Career and Job Seeking Advice to Gen Y
    Selects Lisa Orrell As Panel Expert

    CollegeRecruiter.com, the award winning job board for Gen Y, has selected Lisa
    Orrell, The Generation Relations Expert, to be an expert panelist for their “Ask
    The Expert” career blog

    San Jose, CA – CollegeRecruiter.com has launched its “Ask The
    Expert” career blog for Generation Y (aka Millennials) job seekers, recent grads, and
    those already employed. And Lisa Orrell, author of “Millennials Incorporated”, speaker,
    consultant, and Leadership Coach for Gen Y, has been selected as a panel expert for
    their popular blog.

    “CollegeRecruiter.com is the leading job board for matching college students and recent
    grads with employers offering internship and employment opportunities,” explains Lisa
    Orrell. “So to be selected as an expert panelist for their ‘Ask The Experts’ blog is an
    honor. Our panel team answers questions ranging from how to land a job, to managing
    employees older than you, and everything in between!”
    “Based on Lisa’s extensive knowledge of Gen Y, and her expertise on understanding the
    new dynamics within the multigenerational workforce, she was a perfect fit to be one of
    our experts,” shares Steven Rothberg, President & Founder of CollegeRecruiter.com.
    “We’re thrilled she’s making the time to participate and her insights will help a lot of
    young people seeking solid career and workforce advice.”
    The CollegeRecruiter.com “Ask The Expert” blog is active and answering questions
    regularly. For blog access, visit: https://www.collegerecruiter.com/ask-the-experts/
    For media inquiries, or to reach Lisa Orrell to speak at your next event or conduct a
    presentation for your company, please contact her at: Lisa@TheOrrellGroup.com,
    phone 1-888-254-LISA (5472), or visit www.TheOrrellGroup.com.
    About Lisa Orrell
    Lisa Orrell is The Generation Relations Expert, and author of the popular book,
    Millennials Incorporated. She is an in-demand speaker, consultant, and Leadership
    Coach for Gen Y, hired by well-known organizations to coach their Gen Y talent, and to
    educate their senior leadership and management teams on how to better recruit,
    manage and retain Gen Y employees. She also conducts seminars and keynotes on
    how to improve generation relations to increase workforce morale, productivity and
    revenue. Lisa has been a featured guest on MSNBC, ABC, and NPR, and her expert
    commentary has appeared in (partial list): FoxBusiness.com, Human Resource
    Executive, China’s HerWorld magazine, Monster.com, CareerBuilder.com, HR.com,
    Universum’s Trainee Guides for Norway, Denmark & Sweden, and Employee Benefit
    News. People also follow her popular blog at: blog.generationrelations.com
    About CollegeRecruiter.com
    Founded in 1996 by Steven Rothberg, CollegeRecruiter.com has become the leading job board for college students hunting for internships and recent graduates looking for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.
    College Recruiter.com features hundreds of thousands of job openings and tens of thousands of pages of employment-related blogs, articles, podcasts, and videos. This website has also been featured in countless major media, including: CNN, BusinessWeek, ABC, Fortune, USAToday, and The Wall Street Journal. And, for two
    years in a row, CollegeRecruiter.com received the prestigious Weddle’s User’s Choice Award for best job boards, and was rated a “best” site by CareerXroads.
    For more information about CollegeRecruiter.com, please visit their website or contact: Steven Rothberg, Steven@CollegeRecruiter.com, 800-835-4989 x: 704.

    Originally posted by Candice A

  • Lisa Orrell Happy to Be a Part of CollegeRecruiter.com’s Ask the Experts Panel

    Lisa Orrell of the Orrell Group has not only graciously agreed to contribute to the CollegeRecruiter.com Ask the Experts blog, she has also spoken out in full support of it. Check out her press release below:
    Popular Blog Offering Career and Job Seeking Advice to Gen Y
    Selects Lisa Orrell As Panel Expert

    CollegeRecruiter.com, the award winning job board for Gen Y, has selected Lisa
    Orrell, The Generation Relations Expert, to be an expert panelist for their “Ask
    The Expert” career blog

    San Jose, CA – CollegeRecruiter.com has launched its “Ask The
    Expert” career blog for Generation Y (aka Millennials) job seekers, recent grads, and
    those already employed. And Lisa Orrell, author of “Millennials Incorporated”, speaker,
    consultant, and Leadership Coach for Gen Y, has been selected as a panel expert for
    their popular blog.

    “CollegeRecruiter.com is the leading job board for matching college students and recent
    grads with employers offering internship and employment opportunities,” explains Lisa
    Orrell. “So to be selected as an expert panelist for their ‘Ask The Experts’ blog is an
    honor. Our panel team answers questions ranging from how to land a job, to managing
    employees older than you, and everything in between!”
    “Based on Lisa’s extensive knowledge of Gen Y, and her expertise on understanding the
    new dynamics within the multigenerational workforce, she was a perfect fit to be one of
    our experts,” shares Steven Rothberg, President & Founder of CollegeRecruiter.com.
    “We’re thrilled she’s making the time to participate and her insights will help a lot of
    young people seeking solid career and workforce advice.”
    The CollegeRecruiter.com “Ask The Expert” blog is active and answering questions
    regularly. For blog access, visit: https://www.collegerecruiter.com/ask-the-experts/
    For media inquiries, or to reach Lisa Orrell to speak at your next event or conduct a
    presentation for your company, please contact her at: Lisa@TheOrrellGroup.com,
    phone 1-888-254-LISA (5472), or visit www.TheOrrellGroup.com.
    About Lisa Orrell
    Lisa Orrell is The Generation Relations Expert, and author of the popular book,
    Millennials Incorporated. She is an in-demand speaker, consultant, and Leadership
    Coach for Gen Y, hired by well-known organizations to coach their Gen Y talent, and to
    educate their senior leadership and management teams on how to better recruit,
    manage and retain Gen Y employees. She also conducts seminars and keynotes on
    how to improve generation relations to increase workforce morale, productivity and
    revenue. Lisa has been a featured guest on MSNBC, ABC, and NPR, and her expert
    commentary has appeared in (partial list): FoxBusiness.com, Human Resource
    Executive, China’s HerWorld magazine, Monster.com, CareerBuilder.com, HR.com,
    Universum’s Trainee Guides for Norway, Denmark & Sweden, and Employee Benefit
    News. People also follow her popular blog at: blog.generationrelations.com
    About CollegeRecruiter.com
    Founded in 1996 by Steven Rothberg, CollegeRecruiter.com has become the leading job board for college students hunting for internships and recent graduates looking for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.
    College Recruiter.com features hundreds of thousands of job openings and tens of thousands of pages of employment-related blogs, articles, podcasts, and videos. This website has also been featured in countless major media, including: CNN, BusinessWeek, ABC, Fortune, USAToday, and The Wall Street Journal. And, for two
    years in a row, CollegeRecruiter.com received the prestigious Weddle’s User’s Choice Award for best job boards, and was rated a “best” site by CareerXroads.
    For more information about CollegeRecruiter.com, please visit their website or contact: Steven Rothberg, Steven@CollegeRecruiter.com, 800-835-4989 x: 704.

    Originally posted by Candice A

  • Lisa Orrell Happy to Be a Part of CollegeRecruiter.com’s Ask the Experts Panel

    Lisa Orrell of the Orrell Group has not only graciously agreed to contribute to the CollegeRecruiter.com Ask the Experts blog, she has also spoken out in full support of it. Check out her press release below:
    Popular Blog Offering Career and Job Seeking Advice to Gen Y
    Selects Lisa Orrell As Panel Expert

    CollegeRecruiter.com, the award winning job board for Gen Y, has selected Lisa
    Orrell, The Generation Relations Expert, to be an expert panelist for their “Ask
    The Expert” career blog

    San Jose, CA – CollegeRecruiter.com has launched its “Ask The
    Expert” career blog for Generation Y (aka Millennials) job seekers, recent grads, and
    those already employed. And Lisa Orrell, author of “Millennials Incorporated”, speaker,
    consultant, and Leadership Coach for Gen Y, has been selected as a panel expert for
    their popular blog.

    Continue Reading

  • Remote DBA Experts explain the job of a DBA
    Two administrators, male and female, at server room

    Two administrators, male and female, at server room. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Now a day’s all websites, web pages are dynamic. It means that it’s not just a page where in you read the data. You have multiple options on the page. Multiple tabs, check boxes, buttons that lead to some other data not already on the screen. All of this data shown and possibly shown on the website is basically stored in a data base. So whenever someone types in a website’s name in the address bar, the data base server pushes the home screen data. When you write a simple blog, that blog is stored in the database. When someone wants to read the blog, the blog is retrieved from the database. The comments posted on the blog are also stored in the database, only to be retrieved later on. Continue Reading

  • Ask the Experts Blog is Back By Popular Demand

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    MINNEAPOLIS, MN, June 5, 2009 – In response to recent inquiries, CollegeRecruiter.com has re-launched its Ask the Experts blog. Every week, a group of experts from around the country gives their responses to questions that have been gathered from a variety of sources, such as students, job seekers and employers. Sometimes the experts write articles of their own, which are also open to comments.
    Regular reports on site traffic indicate overwhelmingly that besides looking for jobs, visitors to CollegeRecruiter.com also want as much information as they can get about writing a great resume, acing a job interview, negotiating for the best salary and benefits and the proper way to follow up after interviews are completed. The time could not better for anyone with valuable knowledge on any one of these subjects to be a part of something that’s specifically designed to mentor and guide those who are new to job searching and to those who are uncertain if they’re using best, most effective methods in their quests for jobs or internships.
    By participating in the Ask the Experts blog, contributors are able to gain added exposure for themselves, their companies and their Web sites or blogs. The questions they answer cover a wide variety of career-related topics, such as how to dress for an interview, resume writing, salary negotiation and whether it’s a good idea to go to graduate school. Anyone who signs up to be a regular contributor will be in good company.
    Internship expert, Penny Loretto, has already started contributing. “As a frequent visitor and contributor to CollegeRecruiter.com, I became interested in participating as a contributor [to Ask the Experts] because I value this resource and I believe that students really want a place where they can get professional answers to their personal career-related questions,” said Loretto. “The Ask the Experts blog provides a resource for students to get several answers to their questions from professionals in the field and this information will hopefully help them to make better career-related decisions.”
    Game Theory Group CEO, Vin McCaffrey, has also answered several questions. “CollegeRecruiter.com has long been considered an outstanding resource for undergraduates, graduate students and recent college graduates as they prepare for their career search. The resurrection of ‘Ask the Experts’ creates a great medium to answer questions that are completely relevant for the recent college graduate,” McCaffrey said enthusiastically. “Personally, I love the Q and A format – the questions are asked from the perspective of the candidate and as the industry experts share their experiences and insight, their intent is to help ease the anxieties associated to a job search. We realize how challenging it is to land a job, particularly in this economy. I know how proud I am to be on the panel with my colleagues and hope that we can help those job candidates gain a bit more clarity and confidence in their job search.”
    And executive recruiter, Dwain Celistan, has graciously shared his knowledge. “Ask the Experts blog is a great place for job seekers. It provides a safe environment to ask a question and get credible perspective from knowledgeable professionals,” said Celistan. “As the Career Acceleration Coach, I find it important to help talented people realize their goals. This forum is a great place to provide input to one person, but the feedback may help many more. The combination of perspectives allows the reader to think about their situation differently. I know many persons will make wiser decisions because of the input they get from the ‘pros’.”
    Loretto, McCaffrey and Celistan are only a few of the experts taking the time to offer their insights and advice to interested students and job seekers.
    There is always room for one more expert who’s interested in commenting on one or more of the topics discussed in the blog. So, anyone who feels he or she is an expert in a particular area, like recruiting, personal branding or interviewing – either as an employer or a candidate – is welcome to be a contributor to Ask the Experts. Simply get in touch with content coordinator, Candice Arnold, to be added to the list.
    About CollegeRecruiter.com
    CollegeRecruiter.com is the leading job board for college students hunting for internships and recent graduates looking for entry level jobs and other career opportunities. CollegeRecruiter.com features hundreds of thousands of job openings and tens of thousands of pages of employment-related blogs, articles, podcasts, and videos. For more information, please visit http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com.
    Contact Information for CollegeRecruiter.com:
    Steven Rothberg
    Steven@CollegeRecruiter.com
    800-835-4989 x704

    Originally posted by Candice A

  • Ask the Experts Blog is Back By Popular Demand

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    MINNEAPOLIS, MN, June 5, 2009 – In response to recent inquiries, CollegeRecruiter.com has re-launched its Ask the Experts blog. Every week, a group of experts from around the country gives their responses to questions that have been gathered from a variety of sources, such as students, job seekers and employers. Sometimes the experts write articles of their own, which are also open to comments.
    Regular reports on site traffic indicate overwhelmingly that besides looking for jobs, visitors to CollegeRecruiter.com also want as much information as they can get about writing a great resume, acing a job interview, negotiating for the best salary and benefits and the proper way to follow up after interviews are completed. The time could not better for anyone with valuable knowledge on any one of these subjects to be a part of something that’s specifically designed to mentor and guide those who are new to job searching and to those who are uncertain if they’re using best, most effective methods in their quests for jobs or internships.
    By participating in the Ask the Experts blog, contributors are able to gain added exposure for themselves, their companies and their Web sites or blogs. The questions they answer cover a wide variety of career-related topics, such as how to dress for an interview, resume writing, salary negotiation and whether it’s a good idea to go to graduate school. Anyone who signs up to be a regular contributor will be in good company.
    Internship expert, Penny Loretto, has already started contributing. “As a frequent visitor and contributor to CollegeRecruiter.com, I became interested in participating as a contributor [to Ask the Experts] because I value this resource and I believe that students really want a place where they can get professional answers to their personal career-related questions,” said Loretto. “The Ask the Experts blog provides a resource for students to get several answers to their questions from professionals in the field and this information will hopefully help them to make better career-related decisions.”
    Game Theory Group CEO, Vin McCaffrey, has also answered several questions. “CollegeRecruiter.com has long been considered an outstanding resource for undergraduates, graduate students and recent college graduates as they prepare for their career search. The resurrection of ‘Ask the Experts’ creates a great medium to answer questions that are completely relevant for the recent college graduate,” McCaffrey said enthusiastically. “Personally, I love the Q and A format – the questions are asked from the perspective of the candidate and as the industry experts share their experiences and insight, their intent is to help ease the anxieties associated to a job search. We realize how challenging it is to land a job, particularly in this economy. I know how proud I am to be on the panel with my colleagues and hope that we can help those job candidates gain a bit more clarity and confidence in their job search.”
    And executive recruiter, Dwain Celistan, has graciously shared his knowledge. “Ask the Experts blog is a great place for job seekers. It provides a safe environment to ask a question and get credible perspective from knowledgeable professionals,” said Celistan. “As the Career Acceleration Coach, I find it important to help talented people realize their goals. This forum is a great place to provide input to one person, but the feedback may help many more. The combination of perspectives allows the reader to think about their situation differently. I know many persons will make wiser decisions because of the input they get from the ‘pros’.”
    Loretto, McCaffrey and Celistan are only a few of the experts taking the time to offer their insights and advice to interested students and job seekers.
    There is always room for one more expert who’s interested in commenting on one or more of the topics discussed in the blog. So, anyone who feels he or she is an expert in a particular area, like recruiting, personal branding or interviewing – either as an employer or a candidate – is welcome to be a contributor to Ask the Experts. Simply get in touch with content coordinator, Candice Arnold, to be added to the list.
    About CollegeRecruiter.com
    CollegeRecruiter.com is the leading job board for college students hunting for internships and recent graduates looking for entry level jobs and other career opportunities. CollegeRecruiter.com features hundreds of thousands of job openings and tens of thousands of pages of employment-related blogs, articles, podcasts, and videos. For more information, please visit http://www.CollegeRecruiter.com.
    Contact Information for CollegeRecruiter.com:
    Steven Rothberg
    Steven@CollegeRecruiter.com
    800-835-4989 x704

    Originally posted by Candice A

  • Ask the Experts: Explaining a Long Gap in Your Resume

    Question:

    I have been unemployed by choice for three years. I quit after my 15 day old baby died of SIDS. I felt that I needed to spend more time with my five and eight year old children because they were having a difficult time coping with the death of their sister. I had another baby a year ago and am now ready to return to work on a part-time basis but don’t know how to explain the three year gap on my resume.

    First Answer:

    Don’t mention the gap on your resume, and if asked about the time in interviews, simply say that you took time off to make a difference in your family and now you’re ready to make a difference in the corporate world!

    Tracy Laswell Williams, certified job and career transition coach, accredited resume writer and founder of CAREER-Magic.com

    Second Answer:

    I am sorry for your loss and understand your decision to put your family first.

    Honesty is the best policy. I think you need to calmly explain, as you have to the experts on this panel, that you left voluntarily because of family issues.

    I am assuming that you worked prior to this time, so you have some work experience. Letters of reference might be useful to you, as they will validate the fact that until the time of crisis in your family, you were an exemplary worker. Keep in mind that unfair as it may seem, some employers may worry that if you dropped out of the workplace once, that you will do it again. While children should come first in our society, an employer would prefer for you to put the workplace top on the list.

    When I advise people with gaps in their resume, I help them to determine what objections employers might raise to their particular situation, and we devise compelling responses to these possible objections, in advance of telephone or in-person interviews. That way, they stay focused, confident, and persuasive If you are worried that you might get overly emotional or defensive, or you feel that you might not be able to make the most compelling case for why you’re the best candidate even though you “checked out” for three years, investing in a session or two with a coach either in your hometown or online, might help, too!

    Alison Blackman Dunham, life & career expert, columnist, personal public relations consultant, half of THE ADVICE SISTERS®, and the author of the ASK ALISON career advice column

    Third Answer:

    It is reasonable to be concerned about gaps in time on your resume. However, this one can be handled quickly and with a great deal of ease. You can say you chose to take some time off for life enrichment purposes. You are now ready to fully move forward in your chosen area. Then talk about any career development education you gained while off work or career-related endeavors that kept your skills up to date.

    You may want to read “The Interview,” an article specifically for domestic violence survivors who have been out of the job market for a protracted period of time. It may offer you some ideas about interview “do’s” as well as interview “don’ts.”

    May all of your Entrances be through the doors of success!

    Yvonne LaRose, career and professional development coach, Career and Executive Recruiting Advice

    Fourth Answer:

    Coming back into the workforce after a prolonged absence is as challenging a problem as one can ever face whether coming back from child rearing or any other reason. Most people notice how the pace has changed (although many might offer up the following, “Fast paced? You want fast paced? Try chasing after several pre-schoolers 12 hours each day!”). It is odd though how many people who came from the womb choose to view women coming back from childbirth and child rearing. How quickly many forget. Before I continue, I found an incredibly neat – and comprehensive – website call BlueSuitMom – . It appears to be a great resource for any gender in understanding the dynamics of where care giving interacts with business.

    Explaining being a Mom (or a stay-at-home Dad). Some people still believe giving birth and rearing a child is easier than working. A friend of mine once told me, “Try pushing a cantaloupe out of your…” I took her word for it. But what do you put in your resume and in your cover letter?

    It helps to understand what a resume truly represents: In my opinion, it is a talking piece and while it shouldn’t be an in-depth analysis of one’s life, it needs to detail some of the critical events that formulated one’s current persona. Besides, too many recruiters won’t even look at a resume if it doesn’t address gaps. SIDS is not an alibi – it is a life changing event that if addressed well, can enhance a person’s personality, strength, desire, etc. – and make the person better at handling challenges in the workplace.

    I suppose the person can say they have been a stay-at-home Mom and leave it at that but I think calling oneself a Domestic Engineer is more intriguing (see below). Naturally, all of this is dependent upon what other job skills are brought to the table.

    For the resume. This isn’t a standard approach to addressing motherhood, etc. but it sure goes a long way in explaining what is required to make it successful:

    2000-2004
    Familia LLC; Anytown, US

    COO and Vice President, Domestic Engineering

    During a period of intense cultural upheaval, developed new organizational processes that were integral in maintaining the unit’s core competencies and return to profitability. [I’m not kidding]

    Above all, be certain to include job-related skills and accomplishments. If you use Quicken to manage your families finances, say it. Tailor the resume to fit the job, industry or company.

    When a recruiter makes a face or a crass comment, inform them of the real details. While you may be tempted to say, “Well? How do you think you would have done under the same circumstances?”, it would be better to say, “After what my family has been through, I’m certain that I’ll be able to transfer what I’ve learned to your business environment.” Deflect from the emotion to the job in question.

    Cover letter. As far as cover letters, some folks read them, other’s don’t. “I’m returning to the workforce after a period of motherhood” is all that is required. Sell your job skills not your mothering skills. Of course you can use “mothering” analogies but focus on equating the job requirements to your skill sets.

    Pictures: This may sound harsh but don’t bring pictures of your children to the interview – focus on becoming a member of the business team first. If asked for pictures by the recruiter or hiring manager – hey, most people really love seeing pictures of children (I know I do) – let them know that you’ll be certain to stop by their office your first day of work with your entire family portfolio.

    Until then, it’s all about business.

    Networking. This is obvious but there are great SIDS support groups around the country – http://sids-network.org/, http://www.sids.org/, http://www.sidsalliance.org/index/default.asp, http://www.sidscenter.org/, http://www.sidsfamilies.com/, etc. – be certain you network within these groups for business contacts. Don’t forget members of your maternity classes, nurses, etc.

    Feel free to contact me.

    Steve Levy, Principal of outside-the-box Consulting

    Fifth Answer:

    Your question regarding your three year absence from the work force and how to deal with the employment gap is a good one. The answer is easy-just be honest. You have taken a three year hiatus to spend time with your family. You have spent your time focused on your family, dealing with out of the ordinary circumstances.

    You should list your employment chronologically. When the Recruiter/Hiring manager speaks with you directly, this is the appropriate time to explain your reason for taking time off.

    Your personal circumstances and decision to spend time focusing on family needs is understandable. Rather than detailing your tragic situation, succinctly tell your interviewer because you were able to focus completely on your family for a period of time, you have your family’s support in returning to work. You can now dedicate your time and concentration in an uncompromising way; which will make you a valuable addition to their team.

    If they reject you because you took time off to be with your children in a difficult time, they are indicating a lack of compassion and working with that organization would be a mistake anyway.

    In short, explain the “gap’ of time un-employed in conversation. Do not explain on your resume. Keep the focus on the value you will bring to their company.

    Lisa Alexander, former Medical Sales Representative and hiring manager of pharmaceutical sales representatives and author of PharmRepSelect®, a comprehensive guide to getting a job in the pharmaceutical sales industry

    Originally posted by alwin

  • Ask the Experts: Interviews But No Job Offers

    Question:

    I have near seven years of experience, multiple certifications and a host of good companies and references under my belt. I seem to have no trouble getting the interest of HR people and recruiters with my resume: I average two interviews per week. Unfortunately, that’s where it ends.

    I go into the interview professionally groomed and dressed, completely prepared, answering their questions, asking questions, eye contact, everything I was taught to do with an interview, even sending out the thank you cards via U.S. Mail with handwritten commentaries on the interview. In short, I do everything expected of me in the interview process. However, it all falls short.

    I’ve had about 15 interviews so far, many going to the final stages, but the moment they meet me in person, it ends. I’ve had one occasion where the interview was cut short and I was basically escorted out of the building. I received a rejection letter a few days later but it contained no reason as to why I was being rejected. I cannot imagine what I’m doing wrong at this point other than perhaps I look “wrong” in spite of my professional dress, groom and demeanor.

    After being rejected, I’ve asked the recruiters why I wasn’t picked. They refuse to give me a reason other than to say that they went with a different candidate. I’ve done mock interviews and have been told that I have great interview and interpersonal skills, I dress well and come across as confident. No red flags in anything they have seen on my resume, references or interview process. Can you give me some insight into what could be my problem?

    Note to Readers

    With the consent of the questioner, his resume was sent to the “Ask the Experts” panelists.

    First Answer:

    It is hard to give you a decent answer when I don’t know more about the specifics of your situation, but if you have great experience and a good resume, and you are getting that many interviews without any offers, that indicates that your presentation and interview style needs polishing. I am also worried about your statement that you’ve actually been ushered out of the building without finishing an interview! That signals real problems.

    In my current Ask Alison (Managing Your Life & Career Column): I talk about how important it is to match your job search, at least in part, to your own personality as well as to the required skills. Learning about a company’s corporate culture prior to the interview not only helps you make a personalized and effective appeal to a specific employer, but it also gives you invaluable, advance information about whether or not you would like to work for that company and if you would enjoy being there on a daily basis. If anything about the dress, demeanor, attitude or philosophy of the company and it’s employees makes you very uncomfortable, you might want to reconsider whether you would be happy working for that employer. In your case, perhaps there is something about the way you are presenting yourself that you are unaware of, but that signals the prospective employers that while you have the right skills, you don’t have the right personality for their company.

    You say you are doing all the right things, including “mock” interviews. That is a good start. In my book YOU ARE THE PRODUCT-How To Sell Yourself To Employers I particularly stress that having great skills and knowing glib answers to common interview questions won’t get you the job. The book is all about how to gear yourself not only to what the employer wants, but what the “corporate culture” is. The message you need to send to employers is: “I am appropriate, I am competent, I am productive, I know the rules, I can fit in, I want the job.”

    Again, since I don’t know the particular situation(s) of your previous interviews, I can’t really comment on why they didn’t go well, but perhaps you’ve been too eager, too agressive, or the opposite…too eager to please and sounding “depressed.”I think it’s valid to ask an employer why you’ve been turned down. Some will be honest. You do run the risk of looking unprofessional. However, if you are desperate for real feedback from bona-fide interviewers who rejected you, (nicely) get back to a few of the recent ones that seemdd most interested but where the interview didn’t go anywhere, and repeat your request for feedback. You may get a few who are willing to help you. You can’t push on this, but if you let them know that it is really important for you to “do better” they might open up. Most employers have been on your side of the desk as well, and they know how it feels to be frustrated, baffled and jobless….but they also aren’t going to put a lot of time and effort into dealing with someone they don’t want to “hurt” and that the don’t want to hire. I also suggest that you read a book about personal marketing such as YOU ARE THE PRODUCT. You’ll gain a lot of insight into your own habits and performance which can help you “fine tune” it in the future for success.

    Alison Blackman Dunham, life & career expert, columnist, personal public relations consultant, half of THE ADVICE SISTERS®, and the author of the ASK ALISON career advice column

    Second Answer:

    Performers and athletes sometimes get so caught up in the preparation, that they often neglect to prepare to deal with the “in-the-moment” possibilities. The same can hold true in the business world and in your case the job search.

    While your shoes may be spit shined and your look perfected, it might be the in-the-moment actions that are causing you trouble. Recruiters, hiring managers and interviewers are human—and may discount you for one small thing.

    While I can venture to guess it could be your posture, attitude or even something hygienic (body odor or breath), I’m more likely to assess it is your in-the-moment responses, the way your answers are phrased or the connection between what’s on your resume and what you portray in person.

    Remember, the resume doesn’t get you the job, it gets you in the door. The person who decided to call you in for an interview, did so becasue he/she liked what your resume portrayed. Now, they’re looking for you to expound on the qualifications you claim to have.

    That said, the best way to really determine the issue? Ask yourself the following questions:

    1. Is your resume honest? If you are puporting to be one thing on paper that doesn’t hold true in person, your interview will a quick hello and goodbye (note, this could be as simple as they were expecting a certain type of person based on your resume and when you walked in the door, it wasn’t you.)

    2. How do you prepare for your interviews? You shouldn’t be spitting out scripted answers that sound just that–scripted–but rather prepare examples of situations you can talk to. Things like: a time you disagreed with your boss, a time you took on greater responsibility, a time you handled a challenging customer or client. You should also research the organization thoroughly and tailor your interviewing style to its culture and the things it values. Tailoring your demeanor to the individual you meet with is also crucial.

    3. Finally (and most important) Have you practiced interviewing with anyone? Mock interviews with a professional career coach or with a peer can help you ascertain how you’re being perceived and give you the real, honest feedback you need about your overall demeanor. It also allows you to receive direct feedback on the content of your answers. Do 5-10 mock interviews with a few different people and be prepared to receive constructive criticism and act on it.

    Susan Strayer, Assistant Director, Career Services, School of Professional Studies in Business and Education at the Johns Hopkins University and founder and President of University and Career Decisions

    Third Answer:

    It’s nearly impossible to know what the problem might be without interviewing you. You certainly do seem to be doing all the
    right things.

    I would suggest you keep doing what you’re doing — only with a bit more intensity. Continue to do mock interviews, but do them
    with a variety of people to get some different perspectives. If
    you’ve been doing them with career professionals, add friends to
    the mix and vice versa. It’s possible your friends could be more
    honest with you about any shortcomings they see in your interview
    performance. Most importantly, find someone who can videotape
    your interview performance so you can observe it yourself. You may
    finally arrive at the answer you seek by observing yourself in action.

    It’s true that you will rarely, if ever, find a recruiter who will tell you why you weren’t hired. The reason is that employers
    are afraid of being sued. But don’t let that stop you from
    trying to get the answers you need. As long as you keep asking,
    you will likely eventually find someone who will tell you what you
    want to know. Particularly be on the lookout for interviewers
    with whom you feel you have especially good rapport. If you aren’t
    hired, the person with whom you had good chemistry MAY tell you
    what was wrong with your interview. Instead of asking the confrontational
    “Why wasn’t I hired?” ask a question along the lines of:
    “Could you give me any advice on how I can improve my
    interview performance?”

    One more thing you can try is informational interviewing. An informational interview is NOT a job interview, but
    you can use an informational interview to inquire of
    your interviewee: “I know this isn’t a job interview, but
    do you observe anything about my demeanor or communication
    skills that you think might present a problem in a job
    interview?” Find out how to do informational interviews at:
    http://www.quintcareers.com/informational_interviewing.html.

    Be absolutely sure that there really are no red flags in the references area. You can engage the services
    of a references-checking company that will find out what your
    references are REALLY saying about you. You may think they’re
    all saying good things but be surprised to discover that
    someone is sabotaging you.

    Finally, 15 interviews actually isn’t all that many in this difficult economy, so don’t give up. The fact that
    you haven’t received an offer may actually have absolutely
    nothing to do with your interview skills. Keep plugging.

    Katharine Hansen, former speechwriter and college instructor who provides content for the Web site, Quintessential Careers, edits QuintZine, an electronic newsletter for jobseekers, and prepares job-search correspondence as chief writer for Quintessential Resumes and Cover Letters

    Fourth Answer:

    Today’s job market is flooded with lots of talent going after very few openings. It is not uncommon to hear that hundreds of resumes are received for one position. It is also common to hear that since employers are aware of all the available talent they are now hiring an exact match/fit to the job description and in some cases they keep interviewing for months in search of that “ideal” candidate. You could be the runner-up choice of the 100+ candidates considered. With that said it sounds like you are doing all the right things – conducting mock interviews (although friends may not know enough about interviewing skills or have the heart to speak openly for fear of hurting your feelings), style of dress and presentation skills.

    Perhaps you are targeting the wrong market. When I look at your resume I am seeing a lot of short term (one year and under) positions, were you a consultant? Your resume doesn’t indicate this or provide an explanation for all of the job changes. If you are interviewing now for a long-term position – your experience may qualify you but your lack of longevity may disqualify you. Your resume indicates you have attended two Universities but there isn’t a degree indicated. With all things being equal this could be a factor in why they choose another candidate. Also, your resume states that your education ended in 1987 but your work history begins in 1996 – what were you doing in the years in between?

    With so many candidates looking for jobs, recruiters are overwhelmed in trying to get specific feedback. If you sensed a good rapport with any of the people you met you can contact them directly. Let this person know why you felt you were a good candidate and your desire to join their team and firm. Perhaps they can shed light as to why you weren’t selected – additionally this call may help you get the job after all! Quite often the selected candidate turns down the offer, quits or is terminated shortly after they begin. Rather than repeat the entire interview process if you remain in contact with them you could be the first choice replacement. Use this follow-up call to see if there may be any other departments within the company that your skills would qualify you for. You can ask if this person has any friends/colleagues in other firms where your skills would fit in. This is a great way to build up your network.

    If you are still wondering, work with a professional coach who can guide you through the process easier and faster. I am offering a 20% discount on one month of coaching to anyone who mentions this article.

    Janine A. Schindler, Professional Coach and owner of the Jas Coaching Company

    Fifth Answer:

    It’s difficult to provide insight into the problematic personal interviewing issues when you’re not actually watching the
    situations or meeting the person face to face. The only thing
    that can be done is speculate. That being said, there are quite
    a number of things that could be the, or else contributing
    factors, to your interviewing woes.

    Sometimes we achieve spectacular results that are so dazzling that they’re difficult to believe. If the industry vocabulary or
    underlying technical explanation to support the representations,
    the credibility of the achievements is undercut and casts a
    dubious veil over the representations in one’s resume. Make
    certain the ability to explain the technical in layman’s terms
    is part of your interviewing discussion. Back up those
    representations with written references. Having copies of your
    writing samples that demonstrate your breadth and depth of
    knowledge also serves as validation of your skills, knowledge,
    and representations. Be certain that both your written and
    spoken grammar are excellent — as impeccable as your dress.
    That could be one explanation of the abrupt end of interviews.

    However, another issue could be language [see “Telltale Signs: Communication Barriers“]. There are many instances where one will be nervous in a new
    setting (or one that seems to be challenging). To compensate for
    the tension, a questionable statement can be made that casts
    doubt on one’s discretion and/or tact. Even in non-threatening
    situations, there is the politically incorrect statement that is
    blurted out and everyone pretends to ignore it but the one who
    made the blunder then finds they’re not that welcome any more.

    Yet another explanation could be something extremely personal and delicate. Most, if not all, people are adverse to discussing
    these matters with a stranger, a client, a friend or even a
    relative. They would rather just ignore it and pray that it goes
    away somehow, someday. Meanwhile, the offender is left
    speculating and poking about trying to identify just what the
    issue is. With luck, they learn sooner; with bad luck, they
    never discover what the issue is.

    In your case, I would re-examine what started happening about three to four years ago and then sort through the various work
    scenarios that have ensued. Candidly look for common themes. If
    there have been short work periods where you felt the work was
    stellar but there was an abrupt end or if you were doing
    seasonal/contract work and (again doing what you considered
    stellar work) were not invited to stay on, examine those
    situations. Be honest with yourself and judge each situation as
    an independent onlooker would to see what happened and what may
    have gone wrong and right.

    The answer to your issues may be right under your nose.

    Yvonne LaRose, career and professional development coach, Career and Executive Recruiting Advice

    Sixth Answer:

    I sent the questioner several emails and even left a phone message – to conduct a mini-assessment of the person’s skills prior to addressing the question. Never received a response. Granted, I’m just trying to understand then help but without a response, my problem-with-follow-up-flag gets raised – perhaps the questioner was on another interview.

    After reviewing the person’s resume and conducting a few very informal reference checks, I returned to the initial question and began to make some notes. “Near seven years of experience” implies that the person is probably close to being at the senior level (not managerial or executive). Around this time, some developers typically exhibit a heightened sense of self worth; perhaps the person slightly overestimates their skill level. This is not necessarily a bad thing but some more experienced developers can take umbrage when confronted by aggressive and perhaps slightly less skilled junior developers.

    Then I flagged “References.” One thing a great recruiter will do is contact as many people as possible when conducting reference checks. So if you have a “black eye” in your background – for whatever the reason is – be certain it comes out during the interview. You did say that, “no red flags in anything seen [in my] references”: Are you 100% certain?

    I suspect some people will question your dress and grooming habits. Frankly, I’ve always given engineers more latitude in these areas – does it really matter whether an engineer wears an earring? Sure some may say culture dictates dress but in reality as long as you don’t go too far over the edge into the fringe areas of society, you’re probably safe. Besides, everyone know to look good for an interview.

    Are you interviewing first with HR? Are you taking them too lightly? While they may be gatekeepers, in the hiring process many have the power to cancel a candidacy. I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count the number of techies who looked down upon HR during the interview process only to find a “thanks but no thanks” letter in their mailbox. When they “meet [you] in person, it ends” and on one occasion you were “escorted out of the building” speaks volumes. As strange as these questions sound, I have to ask them: Do you come across as an arrogant and inflexible person? Do you reek of body odor? Do you invade people’s personal space? Do you make people feel uncomfortable by staring at them with Marty Feldman-like big, bulging, goofy-looking eyes?

    Recruiters typically will state that the client or company went with a different person who was more closely aligned with their immediate needs. If pressed, most will stand by this statement because it offers the path of least emotional resistance. However, I know many who will privately offer a candidate constructive advice – don’t know how you ask for feedback but asking in a more neutral way such as “I have a friend who was just eliminated from the hiring process (wink, wink) – would you mind offering some constructive advice to help him succeed in his next interview?” might cut the ice.

    The real answers come from looking inward – expand the ranks of the types of people you mock interview with to include more hiring manager types. Be certain that these people really know how to conduct in-depth talent assessments – drill down behavioral interviews. Videotape some of these interviews to gain a sense of your body language. Research the company’s culture by talking to HR before the interview. Whether it’s learning to play an instrument or becoming a top athlete, success only comes through perfect practice.

    Steve Levy, Principal of outside-the-box Consulting

    Originally posted by alwin

  • Ask the Experts: Employers Mixed About On-line, For Profit Distance Education Schools

    Question:

    I teach graduate students for a for-profit, distance learning school. Their courses are very rigorous and require just as much study time as the courses that I teach at a traditional, brick and mortar state school. What do employers think of for-profit universities that offer only on-line classes? Do they regard them as low quality diploma mills?

    First Answer:

    I think that in the early days of on-line education that the “diploma mill” was an opinion that many held. But I think times are changing.
    Speaking from the prospective of a person who works in an institution of
    higher learning, there has been a big push to develop and promote on-line
    education.

    Promote the skills that you use to teach these graduate course and not the method used to teach them. Use your resume to highlight the wealth of
    skills (both instructional and on-line) that you possess. If you are
    looking for a position in higher education, target those universities who
    either have or are in the process of developing on-line education. They
    will value the experience and skill you will being to the workplace.

    Linda Wyatt, Career Center Director, Kansas City Kansas Community College

    Second Answer:

    The jury’s still out on this one. There are some who accept it wholeheartedly and use it for many of their staff trainings in
    order to reduce training costs. Others are not convinced of the
    legitimacy of the medium because of the many schools that first
    emerged and had no claim on accreditation. Online learning is
    the 20th/21st Century version of correspondence school. As the
    United States was being developed, correspondence education was
    essentially the only means of gaining one’s education.

    As you point out, online universities proliferate the ethosphere. As people’s time and money become more scarce, they
    — and their employers — are demanding quality output for the
    sacrifices that are made. They are demanding content that will
    deliver payoffs in the near future. It is encumbent upon the
    student to research these online universities to make certain
    they are offering quality content and instruction and are
    accredited. Accreditation is a hard-earned status and even more
    hard-earned to maintain. When presenting oneself via resume and
    cover letter, and during the interview, it is important to
    subtlely let the evaluator know that the online university is an
    accredited institution and the studies are just as valid as the
    brick and mortar complement.

    In 2001, I had an opportunity to conduct a roundtable discussion regarding this topic with four leading online universities or
    learning providers — CyberU, Kaplan College, Concord University
    School of Law, and KnowledgeNet. All four distinguished
    panelists noted that online learning is a new version of the
    old, respected principles; what needs to come is recognition of
    that fact. And that recognition is gaining ground.

    The other thing I would note regarding online learning is that technology is making online classrooms ever more like onsite
    learning. Some classes are live sessions via television or
    Internet, some are on-demand lectures and labs. Student
    interaction with fellow classmates is possible through
    discussion boards. Likewise, quality interaction with
    instructors is possible via chat, email, and whiteboard tools.

    Yvonne LaRose, career and professional development coach, Career and Executive Recruiting Advice

    Third Answer:

    This is a question that really has no universal answer, in my opinion. Long distance learning, especially online classes, are a relatively new development in education. In the past, mail order degrees were primarily “diploma mills.” However, the widespread use of the internet has made it possible to bring classes to people in their homes and this is especially good for people who cannot physically attend classes. However, like anything else that is new, it takes time to prove that those who get degrees this way are not being shortchanged. And, just as with in-person educational institutions, there is a lot of variety in the quality of long distance learning facilities — so what employers think may also depend upon the school. My suggestion to graduates of long distance learning schools is to be as impressive as possible in the interview process. In the end, it is what you know (and who you know) and not what school you went to, that should impress an employer.

    Alison Blackman Dunham, life & career expert, columnist, personal public relations consultant, half of THE ADVICE SISTERS®, and the author of the ASK ALISON career advice column

    Originally posted by alwin