Posted November 15, 2017 by

Professional networking: A definitive guide for students and grads to succeed in the job search

 

We put together our most popular content about professional networking and developed a one-stop guide with everything you need to know about networking as a student or recent college grad. The guide includes tips about:

  1. Where to start and how much time to spend networking
  2. The best elevator pitch and a formula for a successful informational interview
  3. Professional networking tips for college seniors to find a job by graduation
  4. The number one networking tip for introverts
  5. Benefits of joining a professional association
  6. Networking mistakes
  7. How to engage authentically

Join an association to do professional networkingRead the full guide: “Networking: A Definitive Guide for Students and Grads to Succeed in the Job Search” 

 

Where to start and how much time to spend networking

Think of professional networking as relationship building. And we actually do this all the time. We just don’t label it networking.

You can also think of networking like a wheel. You are at the center of the wheel and there are spokes going out to all of your connections. Now, imagine you have 20 spokes on the wheel. If those 20 connections have spokes of their going out to 20 more connections, you already have 400 people that you can reach out to.

What do you say when you reach out? You can reach out to learn about their own job, send them your resume, tell them your goals, ask for job opportunities or an informational interview.

Who counts as a connection?

  • Your close friends
  • Family
  • Friends of friends or friends of family
  • Mentors and professors
  • Coworkers
  • Classmates
  • Alumni
  • Volunteer coordinators and supervisors

Networking with an elevator pitch

Read the full guide: “Networking: A Definitive Guide for Students and Grads to Succeed in the Job Search” 

Your pitch is only the beginning of the conversation. Whoever you’re speaking to will ask you questions, but you will have stated who you are, what you’re looking for, and something interesting about yourself.

People love talking about themselves, so ask them how they got started in their career. Find something you have in common (either beforehand by researching them online, or during the conversation). This will help them remember you. Make sure to offer to help them as well. People like to reciprocate, so if you see your networking as a two-way street, they’re more likely to help.

After you meet a new connection, don’t forget to follow up. Connect with them on LinkedIn or send them an email.

Read the full guide: “Networking: A Definitive Guide for Students and Grads to Succeed in the Job Search” 

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