• Interview dress code: Common mistakes and tips for balancing professional with personal

    November 30, 2016 by

    dress code for workGuest writer Lisa Smith

    The cliché holds a lot of truth: the first impression really counts. This is why most people suggest that you dress up prim and proper for an interview. It should come as no surprise that your prospective employer starts gauging you from the time you step into the interview room.

    Many people botch up their interview just because they are unaware of the importance of interview dress code. There are a few common mistakes that you can avoid. Check out out some of the common interview dressing mistakes to ensure you don’t fall prey to these. Here is some advice to get ready for the big day:

    Fit is king:

    Before going for an interview, you spend a long time and effort in picking that perfect outfit. But what about the fit? The way your outfit fits can make a whole difference to your appearance. And this is what will gain you some precious points. If your clothes are too loose, you end up looking drab and careless. On the other hand, clothes that are too tight can make you look uncomfortable which can be misconstrued as nervousness or lack of self-confidence. So, first things first, make sure that the clothes you pick for your interview are fit you perfectly. If they don’t, take them to the tailor.

    Tone down the colors:

    Make sure you select the shades carefully. Bright colors like yellow or shocking pink are a total no-no as these tend to distract people’s gaze and are considered inappropriate. If you are thinking of going with prints and patterns, go for the subtle variety. Large prints and patterns give you a casual semblance which may not appeal to your interviewers.

    Rein in your hair:

    This can be tricky because hairstyle can be an important part of your culture. It is your choice how you want to balance professional conservatism with your personal expression. However, be aware that when it comes to an interview, your interviewer may consider some hairstyles to be a hint of non-seriousness, whether or not that is true.

    Shoes are important too:

    If you thought that you only need to pay attention to your clothes when getting ready for an interview, think again. Your shoes matter too. Though you may sit down across the table when interacting with your interviewer, he or she is bound to notice as you walk up to take your seat. Pick shoes that spell out a formal air. Men should go for leather oxfords or slip-ons. Women should stick to pumps or conservative platform heels.

    Take it easy with the perfume:

    There is no doubt that your choice of perfume speaks volumes about you. However, you don’t want to overwhelm your interviewer with its heady aroma. So, make sure that you spray only a couple of whiffs of your favorite perfume on your clothes, or skip it entirely. Heavy perfume wearers are usually frowned upon in the professional world.

     

    On the job: Balancing between personal and professional

    If you dress perfectly for your interview, you are bound to make a great first impression. This coupled with your smartness is sure to get you that much-coveted job. (Make sure to send a thank you email after an interview to the company, displaying your gratitude for the chance given to you.)

    However, once you get that job and join the company, you have to continue to strike that balance between your personal expression and professional dress code that you so carefully created for the interview. Not doing so may give out wrong messages and get you into the bad books of your employers.

    Understand the Dress Code:

    Each company has its own dress code. So, the smartest thing you can do is to understand the dress code that your organization follows. This could be quite different from the one that you are accustomed to. However, taking to this wholeheartedly is what will portray you as a smart and a quick learner. This will also be proof enough for your easy adaptability to changes.

    Creating your Own Style:

    While you need to follow the company dress code, you don’t have to be a clone of the other employees. Experiment with the dress code to create new looks which are perfect for the work environment. This is a great way to prove that you are brave enough to experiment and innovate without questioning the company policies.

    Keep your work style minimalistic yet smart. This is what will make your bosses and super bosses notice you. Your style speaks volumes about your thoughts and helps you to stand out in the crowd. So, take down this mantra and try to live up to it.

     

    lisa smithLisa is a designer by profession and writer by choice, she writes for almost all topics but design and Fashion are her favorites. Apart from these she also Volunteers at few Animal rescue centers. Connect with Lisa on LinkedIn.

     

     

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  • How employers are using gamification to recruit recent college grads

    November 29, 2016 by
    The movie the Internship used gamification to recruit new team members

    The movie the Internship used gamification to recruit and hire new team members.

    Google. Microsoft. Deloitte. PwC. Cisco. Domino’s Pizza. Marriott International.

    Those are just some of the employers using gamification in recruiting. What is gamification?

    According to recruiterbox.com, Gamification is the concept which uses game theory, mechanics and game designs to digitally engage and motivate people to achieve their goals. According to this Society of Human Resources Management article, “Recruiting experts say gamification can stir people’s interest in job openings, project an innovative image of an employer, and deliver accurate previews of applicants’ future job performance.”

    John Findlay, co-founder of Launchfire, a digital engagement shop that turns boring content and mandatory training materials into a fun, easy-to-digest, game-based learning experience, agrees. Recent college grads are a tech-focused generation and the use of mobile, video, virtual reality and gamification go a long way in recruiting and assessing recent college grads and entry-level job seekers, he says.

    “Today’s employers face the challenge of recruiting and hiring recent college grads and Millennials, the largest generational demographic in the American workforce,” said Findlay. “Many companies are finding that using game-based learning and gamification, which integrate points, badges, competition and role-playing, can be used to effectively attract and assess candidates.”

    Gamification in recruiting came on fast and furious, said David Kirk Chief Revenue Officer of CloudApps, a behavioral motivation and predictive data analysis consultancy and solutions provider.

    “It was all the rage, especially in the IT industry, where technical skills change fast and traditional resumes don’t always tell the depth of job seekers skills,” says Kirk.

    Gamification is commonly used in IT. Want to recruit a top coder? Run a competition to find them, says Kirk.  But it’s also being used in many other industries, like hospitality. Marriott International created a recruiting game to attract Millennials called My Marriott Hotel. This game was delivered through Facebook, and according to the SHRM, allows candidates to experience what it’s like to manage a hotel restaurant kitchen before moving on to other areas of hotel operations. Players create their own virtual restaurant, where they buy equipment and ingredients on a budget, hire and train employees, and serve guests. Participants earn points for happy customers and lose points for poor service. They also are rewarded when their operation turns a profit.  Continue Reading

  • LEGO Group has award winning candidate experience

    November 25, 2016 by

    Award winner

    Congratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among those winners is LEGO Group. Lego has this to say on their LinkedIn page and their website:

    At the LEGO Group®, our mission is to inspire and develop the builders of  tomorrow. True to our spirit  “Only the best is good enough”,  we are a great company to work for – fun , fulfilling and always challenging in a fast moving market and industry.  The great thing about the LEGO Group is everyone seems to have their own story to tell about their LEGO experience, which highlights our belief in a People Promise – Succeed together.”

     

    LEGO Group’s “People Promise”:

    At the heart of the LEGO Group is our People Promise – ‘Succeed together’. We strive to inspire and develop children to think creatively, reason systematically and release their potential to shape their own future – experiencing the endless human possibility. Our culture is based on openness, trust and our core values: Creativity, Imagination, Fun, Learning, Quality and Care – which are reflected in everything we do. The role of the LEGO People Promise is to enable execution of the business strategy and build the long-term health of the company, It defines why people should choose and commit the best of themselves to the organization, clarifies the “give” and the “get of the employee relationship and provides a common point of reference for employee management.

  • Spectrum Health has award winning candidate experience

    November 24, 2016 by

    Award winnerCongratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among those winners is Spectrum Health. Here’s what they have to say on their LinkedIn page:

    Why West Michigan?

    Our partner Hello West Michigan describes the region best: Alluring sunsets, cities bursting with outdoor sculpture, intriguing architecture, dozens of schools and universities, festivals, award-winning orchestras, theater, ballet and entertainment districts teeming with nightlife.   West Michigan’s zest for living and learning results a winning combination of cultures, age groups and beliefs that make up the kind of culturally diverse opportunities you’ll find in only one place: here.

  • Calling all frustrated job seekers: make your voice heard

    November 23, 2016 by

    Frustrated job seekerIsn’t it great that today we can find employers from across the world online? Our parents would have had to scour the newspapers and ask everyone they knew and still found only a fraction of the opportunities available. If you are like many job seekers, however, all this information doesn’t make the the job application process any less frustrating.

    One company is dedicated to hearing your complaints and calling for change. Potentialpark conducts an annual global survey that aims to make it easier for job seekers to interact with companies, find career information and apply to the right jobs. Their survey recently opened in the U.S., and you can participate here. (Bonus for participating: you can win prizes!)

    Potentialpark goes through thousands of career websites, job ads, online applications, and social media channels. They check what they find against the survey results. Finally, they make a powerful case to employers to make things clearer and more accessible for their applicants.  Continue Reading

  • How coding bootcamps benefit both recent college grads and employers

    November 22, 2016 by
    College students using laptop computers in class

    College students using laptop computers in class. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    With technology careers in high demand, coding bootcamps have become a popular method for recent college grads to gain the additional skills needed to jump start, advance, and succeed in a career in technology. Coding bootcamps are short – but intense – training opportunities focusing on teaching students the latest, in-demand technical skills.

    Revature is a technology talent development company providing a turn-key talent acquisition solution for corporate and government partners and no-cost coding bootcamps for university graduates. Revature recently announced several strategic partnerships to provide free on-campus coding bootcamps with the City University of New York (CUNY)Arizona State University, Davidson College and the University of Missouri – with more partnership announcements planned into 2017. A college degree is required at the time of attendance for the on-site bootcamps. Students are typically graduates or even graduating seniors who are ready to deepen their skills and have a job when they graduate. The coding bootcamp is typically 12 weeks, full-time.

    “Revature is training the next generation of software engineers, a profession that continuously needs people current – and even ahead – of the technology curve,” says Joe Vacca, CMO at Revature.We started these university partnerships to create a pathway to high-paying coding careers for graduates across the country.”

    According to a recent report, 73% of coding bootcamp graduates surveyed report being employed in a full-time job requiring the skills learned at bootcamp, with an average salary increase of 64%. Roughly half of the jobs in the top income quartile — defined as those paying $57,000 or more per year — are in occupations that commonly require applicants to have at least some computer coding knowledge or skill. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, software development careers are projected to grow 17% through 2024.

    Continue Reading

  • Ask Matt: How recent college grads can benefit from joining professional associations

    November 18, 2016 by

    Networking2Dear Matt: I’m a recent college graduate who is seeking opportunities to grow and network within my field. I’ve always heard that professional associations are beneficial. Why should recent college grads join professional/industry associations?

    Matt: Joining an industry-related association or trade organization, or young professionals networking organization, are great ways for recent college graduates to network, meet other like-minded professionals, and learn. Many recent college grads have met professionals who have become future co-workers, managers, and even friends, through associations or various professional networking organizations.

    But meeting people and making contacts and friends are only a small reason why joining industry associations are highly recommended for college students and recent college grads.

    “Recent graduates benefit immensely from joining professional associations – and there’s much more to it than networking for job opportunities or brushing up on your interviewing skills,” says Richard Baseil, executive director of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the world’s premier association for signal processing engineers and industry professionals.

    Joining professional associations allows college students and recent college graduates to stay on top of industry trends, learn about volunteer or leadership opportunities, and enables project collaboration. For example, IEEE’s Signal Processing Society offers current students and recent graduates exclusive member benefits including continuing education, substantial discounts on various technical and industry resources, and career recognition through scholarships and awards.  And, since most employees do not stay with a single employer through their career, an association such as IEEE can act as a stable “home base” as members seek other opportunities.

    Employers like employees who step outside their comfort zone Continue Reading

  • Multi-tasking is not a skill: How it’s slowing career growth for Millennials

    November 17, 2016 by
    Man working from home in office, using computer and telephone

    Man working from home in office, using computer and telephone. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Multi-tasking seems like a great idea in concept. And many recent college grads and Millennials see multi-tasking a skill employers covet. Who wouldn’t want to hire someone who can complete many tasks at once, right? After all, Millennials are the best-educated generation in America’s history – surely their brains can handle killing two birds with one stone. Nope! In reality, multi-tasking is like playing guitar while making spaghetti. Both outcomes are going to be disastrous, and one stands a much better chance at nailing that solo and impressing a dinner date if they would just tackle one task at a time.

    That’s the message from Chris Butsch, author of The Millennial’s Guide to Making Happiness, a positive psychology book for young people driven by humor, science, and stories from Millennials around the world.

    “There’s overwhelming evidence that our brain doesn’t like to multi-task,” says Butsch.

    Butsch explains further:

    “First off, our brains, like our laptops, have a limited amount of processing power. When we open too many programs at once, the whole system slows down, and each individual task takes much longer to process.”

    He continues: “Researchers estimate that when we multi-task, our IQ drops by 15 points and our productivity drops by 40%. That doesn’t mean that we’re doing two tasks at 60% and 2 x 60 = 120%; it means that two, 1 hour-long tasks will take three hours and 20 minutes if done at the same time, and the quality of both outcomes will be significantly worse. Continue Reading

  • Job postings on College Recruiter outperform those on competitor sites by 472.4 percent

    November 16, 2016 by

    Apply NowEver hear the expression about it being important now and then to stop and smell the roses? Well, I just did that and was it ever refreshing.

    A potential new client of College Recruiter challenged us to do more than just tell him that his job postings would work well on College Recruiter. He wanted to know how much better they would likely work on our site as compared to other job boards and he wanted us to provide to him actual data rather than just estimates. He was certainly asking a lot more of us than most of our potential clients but good for him. An informed client makes for a happy client.

    The client had two main questions:

    1. What is the average number of views per job? We attached to our emailed response an  example of a monthly job detail report that we emailed to an organization which is quite different from the client’s in terms of what they offer to their clients but quite similar in terms of how we envision working with the client. As you can see, in September we ran 1,370 jobs for the existing. Note that jobs were activated on virtually every day of the month and so the average job ran for only half of the month. We tracked and report 15,020 views for an average of 10.96 views per job. Given that the average job ran for half of the month, that equates to 21.93 views per job. Continue Reading

  • Diversity bonuses: do they work?

    by

    Employee happy with his bonusCompanies who understand the importance of hiring diverse employees are pouring millions into their Diversity and Inclusion efforts. One such effort is to offer a “diversity bonus” to recruiters or employees who make referrals. The results are mixed. In 2015, Intel started offering $4,000 to employees who refer women or minorities. It may have played a part in their increase in diverse hiring. Facebook tried to incentivize recruiters to recruit more diversity, and it doesn’t seem to be working. A third example isn’t actually a bonus but a mandate. The NFL’s Rooney Rule requires teams to interview minority candidates for coaching and senior football operation jobs. When they put the policy in place, there were six head coaches of color. Over 12 years, the NFL added 14. This does seem like progress, albeit a bit slow moving.

    Some love the idea of paying out for minority and women candidates. Some say it just doesn’t feel right. If you decide to invest in this approach, make sure to think through the risks and how to do it right.

    Continue Reading