• How traveling abroad after college can help you land your first job [infographic]

    October 31, 2016 by

     

    Are you thinking about traveling abroad after college, but you worry about entering the working world one year later? Don’t worry! In fact, traveling the world will help you acquire some very necessary skills to get your first job. While having fun and exploring new cultures, you will learn things you wouldn’t otherwise. And when you are back from your adventures, you can make travel look good on your resume and in an interview. Here are six ways to take advantage of your traveling experiences and stay on track to launch your career:

    1. Take time to reflect

    Knowing what you want to do straight after graduation can be quite challenging. Before making this important decision, it may be beneficial to take some time off to travel abroad and analyze the future of your career from a different perspective. Traveling will give you the chance to disconnect from your daily routine and have time for yourself to consider the different options.

    2. Volunteer

    If you have just finished college, you may not have any working experience yet. But that is not a problem! You can do some volunteering work while traveling; it will be easier than you think. You can choose some fantastic volunteering programs at GoAbroad.com based on the country you want to visit, the causes you care about and the duration you have in mind.

    Volunteering abroad will look exceptional on your resume and will help you to stand out from the competition. Employers will highly value your commitment, responsibility, and devotion.

    3. Grasp a new language

    Being able to communicate with international business is increasingly important in the workforce. Speaking a second language will broaden up your career prospects, and it may impact your overall earnings. In the United States, Spanish is the second most-spoken language, and it may help you not only to get a job in the customer service industry but also in many B2B career opportunities. Furthermore, languages like Mandarin and Arabic are becoming extremely useful in international business, and there is a lack of Americans who are bilingual in these two languages.

    There are different ways you can learn a new language while traveling abroad after college. Some suggestions are: attend a short course in your destination country, enroll in an online language course, stay with a local host, chat to locals, read the papers, watch original version films with subtitles and download the dictionary app that best works for you. Even if you don’t become fluent in a new language, you will learn the basics, and that effort and knowledge are valued by hiring managers. Include your language skills on your resume to show you are a curious person, always trying to learn more and go the extra mile.


    TIP: Make sure to supplement your online job search with networking. Once you get guidance from your network, target your online search to the right job titles and companies. After you apply, follow up with someone who works there. College Recruiter lists thousands of entry-level job opportunities. Would it make sense to start searching?


    4. Build organizational skills

    Traveling, just like business, requires a lot of organization. You will gain a set of skills that you will find highly useful later on in your career, including:

    • Managing budgets like a pro. If you run out of money too soon, your adventure is over!
    • Becoming more adaptable and flexible. If your original plans change, you need to be prepared for what is next.
    • Getting better and faster at problem-solving. If you get lost, for example, you may need to be able to read a complex map or get instructions and follow them correctly.
    • Being responsible for your own decisions. When you are on the road, you are constantly making decisions that will affect your travels. If for instance, you decide to take a bus instead of a train and it takes longer than expected, you will have less time to spend at your destination.

    Overall, you will return from your adventure being a more mature and experienced person.

    5. International networking

    Take this opportunity to meet as many people as you can. Engaging with people from other cultures and backgrounds will enrich you as a person and will help you see life from different angles. Talk to locals and other travelers; you may find people abroad who are interested in your industry, and you never know who will recommend you in the future or where will you meet your next employer! Connecting with them on social media networks may be a good idea to stay in touch in the future.

    6. Start a blog

    Starting your own travel blog is the best way to put together your traveling experiences and tell the world. The benefits of starting a blog while traveling are endless: improve your writing skills, get better at photography and video, learn about online marketing, social media management, search engine optimization, develop relationships with other bloggers and so on.

    All the abilities acquired creating a blog will help you land your first job even if it is in a completely different area. Your blogging capabilities will make you better at communicating, working faster and being more efficient. All appreciated skills for any job position.

    If you are still in two minds about traveling abroad after college, talk to other people you know who have done it before. You will find out that nobody regrets having such a profound experience.

    This infographic comes from Essay Writing Service UK:

    Traveling after college is a viable option

    Maria Onzainmaria-onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food. Connect with Maria on LinkedIn

     

     

     

    Want more job search and career advice? Stay connected with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube

  • Oven-ready hires: The problem of matching available skills to our demands

    October 28, 2016 by

    Oven ready dishGuest writer Martin Edmondson, CEO and founder of Gradcore

    It feels like there is an ever-growing consensus among employers that university graduates should emerge fully formed, perfectly skilled and immediately work ready. The phrase ‘oven ready’ graduates appears far too often for my liking. It oversimplifies what is ultimately a very complicated issue: How do you match the supply of skills and people with the demands of the economy, when both are moving targets? In other words, how much should employers compromise when searching for the ideal candidate? How much should they training should they assume?

     

    This is such a significant issue in the UK that the government has created a ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ for universities. One of its goals is to tackle “skill mismatches” in the economy. (Go figure that the same government is now limiting their own access to skilled talent via immigration clampdowns.)

    Every employer presents unique circumstances. So it’s critical for employers to examine their fundamental approach to hiring with a few questions such as:

    • What characterizes the hires you make that are successful, and those that are not?
    • What is the most critical factor for fit with your organization – skills, values, attitude etc?
    • How recently did you evaluate what is really important in the people you hire?
    • If all the evidence says that those people are not available for that price in this place, which one of those variables are you prepared to change?

    Here is the challenge: So many employers are seeking candidates with the skills that are in shortage areas. This is typically around digital and software roles where there is a major disconnect between employer requirements and the quality and quantity of graduates available. Employers (and policy makers who are trying to solve these problems) should try one of the following:

    1. Grow your own

    This is the long game, but often one of the most successful approaches if you have the time. Recruit graduates who have the core attributes or values that suit your organisation, but need to develop their skills further. Then put in place the structured training that will develop them. This could be in house training, or delivered under emerging models such as degree-apprenticeships.

    2. Think differently

    Stop looking at the really obvious candidates. This could be described as the Blue Ocean approach, getting away from where everyone else is fishing. Recently I saw a very interesting post from a company called Talla about mapping resumes using neural networks. This visual approach helps you to appreciate that people who superficially have seemingly different backgrounds are actually remarkably similar. Each of the dots below is a resume. This shows how different titles share characteristics:Point graph of title descriptions on resumes

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Up the budget

    Sometimes you simply need to either increase the budget in order to reach a wider audience, or increase salary to attract the necessary skills. While it’s never ideal, there are clearly certain economic realities that are hard to escape.

    Underlying all of this is a bigger societal question, which will be answered differently in different countries:

    Whose job is it to make a person employable?

    Is it the role of the education system and teachers? Employers? Parents or the state? Or are we all solely responsible for our own development? All play a part, but the prevailing national answer to this question goes a long way to deciding the expectations employers have of graduates and vice versa.

     

    Look forward to discussing this and lots of other topics around college recruiting at the College Recruiter Bootcamp in Washington DC on December 8.

    martin-edmondsonMartin is the CEO and founder of Gradcore, a social enterprise focused on graduate employment and employability. Martin has more than 15 years of experience in graduate recruitment and Higher Education. He founded Gradcore, and over the last decade has led a wide range of graduate recruitment and employability projects. These include running global graduate schemes for a range of large employers, delivering employability performance improvement in universities, and chairing the UK and European Graduate Employment Conferences. Martin was a member of the steering group for the ‘graduate recruitment in SMEs’ report for the UK government and has written for a wide range of newspapers and websites. Connect with Martin on LinkedIn.

  • Health care hiring experts reveal keys to success: What you need in an analytics and data career

    October 27, 2016 by
    Female hospital administrator working at a modern medical center

    Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Analytics, big data, data mining, and data science. Those are not just buzz words, but job titles for some of the hottest jobs of the future. And actually, the present. Especially in health care careers, where professionals throughout the world are using a variety of analytics and data to help cure diseases and solve business problems.

    How so?

    The Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. used data mining to model patient populations and define chronic disease groups, which ended up improving their ability to help diabetic patients manage and reduce complications of their disease. Health care providers are using predictive analytics to find factors associated with high-cost patients. They can detect insurance fraud and even forecast medical outcomes. Analytics and data continually make more impact in health care. And so do the job opportunities. But for recent college grads, understanding the job titles and career paths of analytics and big data careers can be confusing.

    “The good news is that opportunity is abundant,” says Kevin Purcell, Ph.D., a Professor in the analytics program at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Harrisburg, PA. “As with any new field, sometimes deciphering job titles is the first hurdle.”

    Purcell breaks down these potential job titles and what the job entails:

    • Data analysts: Responsible for gleaning information from data using various software packages and their knowledge of SQL on databases. This is often combined with intermediate level statistics.
    • Data scientists: Responsible for gleaning information from data, but at a larger scale and also often tasked with more open questions. The skill also demands more advanced statistical knowledge such as machine learning as well as programming skills to better manipulate data to his or her own will.
    • Data engineers: Typically software engineers that focus on building robust data pipelines that clean, transform and aggregate messy and unorganized data into usable data sources.
    • Big data architects: Develop plans for integrating, structuring, and maintaining a company’s data sources often employing big data technology such as Hadoop

    Chris Lee is the Manager of Performance Measurement at Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) in Orange, California. He sees two key skills that are crucial to success working in analytics and data in the health care industry. Those skills are analytical and technical skills – combined with interpersonal skills. Sure, it’s important to have advanced Excel skills, knowledge of databases, strong data mining and presentation skills. However, the most technical people need interpersonal skills to work with others, including non-technical co-workers.

    “The main thing I’ve learned in the field that students can’t learn in the classroom is the interpersonal aspect of working with people who request data,” says Lee. “The people you will work with in the real world have all sorts of personalities and traits. Great interpersonal skills will help one foster relationships and make the data analysis portion of the job much easier when you can clearly define and understand the data elements that the requester is asking for. Most successful analysts have that right balance that enables him or her to interact with the data requester to generate/create the correct data analysis.”

    Purcell agrees: “It is imperative for both data analysts and data scientists to be competent communicators,” he says. “Data storytelling is an indispensable skill needed to communicate technical findings to non-technical audiences with a focus how the findings can impact the business or organization.”

    Purcell says employers look for other core skills such as intellectual curiosity, analytical thinking, and knowledge of software tools such as R, Python, a high-level programming language (Java or C++), and GUI-based visualization.

    Kevin Huggins, Ph.D., also a Professor in the analytics program at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, says getting hands-on, real-life experience is crucial to launching one’s entry-level analytics and data career.

    “Nothing can replace practical experience,” says Huggins. “Internships are excellent options, but sometimes not available to everyone. Since most platforms are open, contributing to open competitions or open-source collaborations can provide experience where professional opportunities are scarce.”

    Carolyn Thompson, Managing Principal, Merito Group, LLC, a talent acquisition and consulting firm, says the single most requested skill set in healthcare analytics that employers seek is revenue cycle experience. “Because of the complex nature of payment and provider relationships, this is an area where the demand is literally never fully met,” says Thompson. “These people have strong Excel skills, good business judgment and can do modeling and forecasting around all the various aspects of healthcare revenue.”

    Andrew S. Miller, President & CEO of BrainWorks, a leader in big data recruitment, says employers want recent college graduates who are trained in statistics, math, quantitative analysis, using programs, and algorithms. But ultimately, recent college grads also have to be able to communicate and present the data.

    “The ability to take your finding and present to key business stakeholders is critical,” says Miller. “Employers want a person who can not only massage and manipulate data, but interpret the data into insights and meaningful conclusions. If they can’t convey the information in a way that makes sense or sells management or what action to take, their value to the employer becomes limited.”

    Analytics and big data jobs are hot and in demand. Especially in the health care industry. Use these tips to advance your career and land that first job or internship.

    Want to learn more about the latest in analytics and data careers? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Affinity groups: value to employee and employer

    October 26, 2016 by

    Group of different birdsAt a recent People of Color Job Fair, employers touted their welcoming workplaces. Many referred to their affinity groups as how they are inclusive of diversity. If offered genuinely, affinity groups can bring value to both the employee and the employer.

    Value to employees

    1. Take a rest from the code-switching. It can be lonely working in an office full of people who don’t look like you. Code-switching all day can be exhausting. (For those less familiar, “code-switching” is a daily practice for people who navigate two cultures. They adjust their dialect/language/mannerisms to fit into the surrounding culture without being questioned. NPR has a nice illustration of code-switching.) Affinity groups can offer relief for anyone who needs a space where it feels safer to express yourself freely. Groups are meant to bring people together who share a common interest or culture. Examples are veterans, women, African Americans and GLBT affinity groups. It’s about solidarity (“Why Women’s Spaces Matter”).
    2. Build your network. In your affinity group, you will probably find yourself networking with colleagues outside your immediate team. This can be helpful to your career. Especially for entry-level and younger employees, more experienced colleagues can give you advice and point you to resources.
    3. Build new skills. You don’t have to wait for a formal company training to learn new skills. Informal group discussions offer excellent opportunities to learn new tools, technology or best practices that can make you more effective and valuable at your company.

    Value to employer

    1. Boost retention of employees. Engagement is king. For those who claim that affinity groups look more like segregation than inclusion, consider how relieving it can feel for an employee to join an affinity group and feel at home with other colleagues who “get them.” That employee, in turn, may feel more positive about her work, thus stick around longer. In addition, group members can collaborate with management to discuss issues of recruitment and retention, and shed light on how to improve your practices. In this example, GLBT employees helped shape their organization’s benefit policy for domestic partnerships, making them more competitive.
    2. Get new consumer insights. Affinity groups can collaborate with management to discuss marketing solutions for consumers from their own community.
    3. Low-cost learning and development. Affinity group members share resources with each other, best practices, and new tools and technology. This no-cost informal learning is a nice supplement to expensive formal company training.
    4. Reap the benefits of diversity. Multiple studies point to the increased productivity and profits of diverse companies. However, if your work environment isn’t inclusive, these benefits remain out of reach. If managed well, affinity groups can be part of your inclusion strategy.

    Doing it right

    1. You can’t force affinity groups. They must be employee-led, and membership can’t be forced. If employees feel that the group has been too packaged without their input, you lose their buy-in and engagement.
    2. Give it time. The longer your organization has affinity groups, the more likely you will be able to align them to business goals.

    Veteran’s Day is November 11! Here are a few companies who have created affinity groups for veteransWant to keep up on the latest career and job search tips and trends for recent college grads? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Decoding your paycheck: What recent college grads should understand

    October 25, 2016 by
    Money saved for college with a small graduation cap

    Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Recent college grads and entry-level job seekers are often excited to get that first paycheck. But they are also shocked when they suddenly realize the amount of that check may not be what they thought it would be. Remember when Rachel from Friends sees her first paycheck? (“Who is FICA and why is he getting all my money?“) Understanding how to decode your paycheck can help recent college grads become fiscally responsible.

    “Educating yourself on how to read your pay stub and understand the information it contains can be the key to effective money management and proper budgeting,” says Brian Michaud, Senior Vice President, Client Service, ADP TotalSource.

    Below, Michaud helps decode your paycheck, and understand just where all your money goes:

    Gross and Net Pay
    The two main components to understand are Gross Pay and Net Pay:

    • Gross Pay: Gross pay is the total amount of wages you’ve earned for the pay period (a pay period is determined by your employer). This is typically bi-weekly or monthly. It’s your regular pay plus any other wages you earn, such as overtime pay or bonuses. Your taxes are based on gross pay.
    • Net Pay: Net pay is the amount of money you actually receive on payday, or your “take home pay.” It’s your gross pay minus all deductions and all federal, state, and local taxes.

    The basic components of a paycheck

    • Federal tax: When you are first hired by your employer, you are required to fill out a Form W-4. This form covers any tax that you may owe to the Federal government come tax time. It is deducted incrementally from each paycheck, and varies depending on how many exemptions you claimed.
    • State tax:  If your state has a tax, this amount is deducted from your paycheck the same way as Federal tax to cover the amount of tax that you may owe to the state when your tax return is filed.
    • Local Tax: Although rare, a local tax is sometimes applied to employees of certain cities, counties or school districts. For example, if you live in New Jersey, but work in New York City, you will be required to pay not only New Jersey state tax, but also New York City tax on your earnings.
    • FICA:  FICA stands for Federal Insurance Contributions Act and refers to amounts deducted for Social Security and Medicare taxes.
    • Retirement Plan Contributions:  Plans such as 401(K) or 403(B) retirement savings plans will deduct the percentage you decide to contribute from each paycheck.

    Here are a few items that you might find on your paycheck stub:

    • Insurance Deductions:  This is the monthly payments for such types of insurance as health (medical and dental) and life insurance.
    • Leave Time:  This includes vacation hours or sick hours. Most employers will detail how many hours have been used to date, and how many hours are remaining for the calendar year.
    • Childcare Assistance: If offered by your employer, this amount may appear on each paycheck as a pre-tax benefit.
    • Year-to-date (for pay and deductions): The year-to-date fields on your paycheck stub show how much you have paid toward a particular withholding at any point in the calendar year.
    • Important Notices: Employers often use the paycheck stub to communicate important pieces of information to their employees, such as wage increases or notifications about tax filings.

    Related: How the new overtime laws will affect interns and recent college grads

    Understanding pre-tax contributions/savings
    In a 401(k), you contribute “pretax” dollars, which means your contributions are taken from your paycheck before your income is taxed. This matters because, with that contribution set aside from the total paycheck before taxes, a smaller amount is taxed thereafter. Depending on your tax bracket, this could lower your taxable income while simultaneously saving money for retirement.

    Suggestions for recent college grads

    • Have a conversation with your parents: Determine what your taxation status is. Based upon the timing of your job, you may still qualify as a dependent for their taxes. Have a conversation regarding the standard dependent deduction vs. filing on your own based on the timing of getting the job, says Michaud.
    • Review benefits: Along those same lines, make sure that you are reviewing benefit offerings with your parents.  If you are under 26 years old, compare the cost and benefits offered by your parent’s plan to your employer’s plan, and what is available on the public health care exchanges. You might qualify for a credit on the exchange, says Michaud.
    • Calculate withholdings: Make sure that you calculate appropriately for Federal, State and, if applicable, Local tax withholding. Review your taxation calculations and ensure that you don’t under or severely over withhold. Federal taxation and state taxation can have very different rules and rates.

    Many recent college grads are only concerned about the bottom line of their paycheck – the take home pay. But understanding where your hard-earned money goes, and how to maximize savings, is a good start for recent college grads planning for the present and future.

    “Knowing where your money is going can help you stay on top of your finances and make the most of your hard-earned paycheck,” says Michaud.

    Want to keep up on the latest career and job search tips and trends for recent college grads? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

    Brian Michaud, Senior Vice President, ADP TotalSource®

    Brian Michaud, Senior Vice President, ADP TotalSource®

    About Brian Michaud, Senior Vice President, Client Service, ADP TotalSource®
    Brian Michaud is senior vice president of ADP TotalSource®, ADP’s Professional Employer Organization (PEO).  He and his team manage the company’s Human Resources Business Process Outsourcing (HRBPO) practice for small to midsized business owner clients, which delivers HR management, benefits administration, time and attendance, and payroll services as one Human Capital Management solution. Michaud started with ADP in 1991 as a sales representative for its Small Business Services business and joined the TotalSource business in 1999.

  • Four reasons why insurance is a great industry for recent college grads

    October 24, 2016 by

    InsuranceGuest writer Walt Capell, President/Owner of Workers Compensation Shop

    1. The workforce in the insurance industry is aging.
    According to the Insurance Journal, “The average age of an insurance industry professional is 54, and 60 percent of insurance industry professionals are older than 45.” For this reason, there are going to be a considerable amount of people in the industry who will retire over the next 15 years. For the millennial generation this opens up opportunities for them to gain experience, have access to mentors with years of wisdom and position themselves for very lucrative positions in the not so distant future.

     

    2. It’s not just a guy’s club anymore.
    In the past, the insurance industry has been heavily male dominated. Change has come slowly but surely. When you make a living depending upon successful risk analysis you tend to stick to what has been proven to work in the past and you tend to be wary of any new ways of doing things. For people who have worked in insurance for a long time, it is their nature to stick with what works and avoid risk or changes. Fortunately, more businesses in the industry have recognized the need to be more inclusive of women and the guy’s club is more a thing of the past. In 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, women made up 47% of the overall workforce, but they were 59% of the workforce in the insurance industry.

    There are still far too few women in leadership roles, however. According to 2011 Bureau of Labor Statistics Data women make up only 6% of top executive positions, 12.5% of seats of the board of directors and only 8% work inside business, legal or actuarial officer roles. A few examples of these roles include chief actuary and division president.
    3. People will always have to purchase insurance in some form or fashion.
    Insurance is kind of like death and taxes. Everyone has to purchase some form of insurance whether they like it or not. This is true if you want to drive a car or own a home. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act people now must purchase health coverage or face a fine. Depending upon the state in which you live, nearly all businesses are required to purchase general liability and workers compensation insurance. Because of these requirements to purchase coverage, the insurance industry will continue to provide recent graduates with relatively stable growth for the foreseeable future.

    4. Millennials are becoming a target market.
    Millennials are now approaching the age where they are purchasing insurance on their own and are beginning to start their own businesses. This makes them a target market for insurance companies to market to. Before long they will be a larger part of the population than the baby boomers who were the largest generation in history. This is good for millennial women because these insurance companies will market to millennials on their terms. Twenty years ago most insurance transactions took place in person or maybe over the phone with someone you knew closely. Millennials, however, are comfortable searching for and purchasing an insurance policy over their mobile device without ever interacting with a person. Because the way a customer purchases insurance has changed so dramatically over the past decade, the industry needs people to help them reach these customers through technology. Older generations, who now make up a majority of the workforce in the insurance industry, are generally less technologically savvy. Young job seekers with a variety of backgrounds—from IT and Graphic Design to even Digital Marketing—should consider the insurance industry as a career path.

    walt-capellWalt Capell is the President/Owner of Workers Compensation Shop. Walt started Workers Compensation Shop in 2005. Workers Compensation Shop is a rapidly growing national insurance agency with a strong reputation for forward-thinking, out-of-the-box products and solutions for business owners. Walt would like to use his experience in insurance and as a small business owner to benefit the small business community.

  • 10 unique career paths for college grads pursuing sport analytics careers

    October 21, 2016 by
    Group of businesspeople at work

    Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    The interest in sport analytics careers is growing at a rapid rate. So much that Syracuse University now offers an undergraduate degree in the field of sport analytics. College Recruiter profiled Syracuse University sports economist and analytics professor Rodney Paul, and he discussed the five skills college grads should master for success in a career in sport analytics.

    While much of the focus is how sport analytics is impacting professional sports, the reality is different. Not everyone working in sport analytics works in professional sports. In fact, there are more sports analytics jobs outside sports organizations such as the NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, WNBA, and MLS than there are inside those organizations. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, data analytics jobs are growing at a rate of 27 percent annually, far exceeding the national job growth average of 11 percent. The sport industry is the fifth-largest economic sector in the U.S. economy, generating slightly less than $500 billion in 2014-15. Taking things a step further, The Sports Analytics Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2015 to 2021 research report valued the sports analytics market size at $125 million in 2014, but anticipated growth to reach $4.7 billion by 2021.

    Below, we look at some sport analytics career paths to pursue if you have a background in analytics or data science. This field is constantly changing so there are job titles that haven’t been created yet. But getting started in these career paths are sure to help catapult a career in sport analytics:

    1. Fantasy sports industry
    The fantasy sports industry is booming, and so are organizations that use data and analytics to help fantasy sports players make data-driven decisions. How so? Learn more in this profile of a recent college graduate working for a sports analytics company that provides data and analytics-driven analysis to college and professional sports organizations – and fantasy football players.

    2. Sports media industry
    Sure, organizations like ESPN and Fox Sports hire analytics experts to make game predictions. But they are also using data and analytics to drive content-based decisions. John Wildhack, Executive Vice President, Programming and Production, ESPN, said this in an article discussing the Syracuse University undergraduate degree in sport analytics: “Increasingly, analytics are an integral part of many of our content offerings, both in the linear and digital space. As sports teams and leagues invest in analytics, it will create and drive content.”

    3. Weather-related technology
    Howard Hamilton is the founder and CEO of Soccermetrics Research LLC. He leads algorithm and software development of advanced team and player performance metrics, and is an internationally-recognized thought leader on the current and future state of soccer analytics. He is working on a project that uses analytics and data to decipher the outcome weather has on outdoor sporting events, such as soccer.

    4. Retail industry
    Under Armour is the fastest growing sports clothing and accessories company in the world. But as pointed out in this article, “the company appears to be looking to change the way athletes train and perform using data analytics.”

    Nick Carparelli Jr., is senior director of college sports for UNDER ARMOUR®, and he sits on Syracuse University’s Falk College’s Sport Management Advisory Board.

    “The process of making sound business choices always starts with investigation and research,” said Carparelli. “Effectively analyzing data, whether it be information about purchase intent from our consumers or a marketing evaluation on a prospective partner, is a critical next step in any decision making process. The ability to process and understand that information is a necessary skill set in our industry.”

    5. Food and beverage industry
    In 2014 Levy Restaurants announced the launch of E15, a subsidiary that provides advanced analytics services to sports, entertainment, and hospitality and retail organizations. E15 uses advanced intelligence to optimize user experiences and financial performance to other sports and entertainment venues, operations and teams, in addition to retail and hospitality clients. For example, E15 can provide data to professional sports teams to analyze how the score of a game, time of day or night, or other factors that impact a fans in-game food and beverage purchases.

    6. Golf industry
    Mark Broadie is a Carson Family Professor of Business and vice dean at the Columbia Business School in New York City, and the creator of the “strokes gained” method, which crunches mountains of data to show both professional and amateur golfers how to make better decisions on the course. Broadie wrote the book Every Shot Counts, where he uses analytics from the financial world to uncover secrets of the game of golf. Other companies like ShotLink use an analytics platform for collecting and disseminating scoring and statistical data on every shot by every player in real-time. For example, with ShotLink data, golfers can compare shots of 100 golfers who had a similar shot in the same location on the same course that a professional or amateur golfer does. Another company, 15th Club, focuses on “helping golfers win by applying intelligence and context to data.”

    7. Health and wellness: Health care companies and sports injury specialists are using analytics to help analyze, determine – and yes, predict how, when and why sports injuries occur.

    8. Corporate brand engagement: Want to work for an advertising agency? Using analytics and data can help you gain that coveted corporate sponsorship, or develop a brand campaign that helps a company and sports organization maximize exposure and sales.

    9. High school sports recruiting and scouting: Analytics are already commonplace in professional and collegiate scouting. NCSA – National Collegiate Scouting Association, which specializes in recruiting, scouting and connecting high school athletes, is searching for a data analyst to help use analytics in a wide variety of scouting areas.

    10. Mobile technology: No surprise here – mobile technology and sports are interconnected. Every sports organization is constantly seeking the latest in greatest in integrating fan engagement with a mobile experience that connects fans to their favorite sports team.

    Sport analytics careers are hot, and they are changing fast. These are just a few of the many growing opportunities and sport analytics career paths to pursue. Those pursuing careers in sport analytics can benefit from following other resources such as the industry-leading MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, and by staying connected to College Recruiter. To do so, visit our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Growing Your STEM Career

    October 20, 2016 by

    Love your science careerGuest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    The STEM workforce is crucial to America’s global competitiveness. STEM graduates have more career opportunities now than any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, a global chemical company, examines ways that recent college grads can establish a strong foundation to join the next generation of scientists and engineers. The first post in this series examined the different education paths to consider when preparing for a STEM and the second post examined the STEM career opportunities available. 

    STEM employment will increase rapidly: about 13 percent between 2012 and 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that STEM jobs will outgrow non-STEM jobs by almost two to one.

    If you are planning a career in STEM, you should know which areas are expected to have the most job openings. For instance, the fastest-growing STEM undergraduate degrees in 2013 were statistics, computer information technology, administration and management, and environmental health engineering, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

    Once you’ve landed your STEM job, how do you advance your career?

    Forward-thinking companies recognize the importance of creating a strong internal talent pipeline in order to fill the skills gap, and seek to attract and retain employees with growth potential. Many businesses now provide unique opportunities for employees to design their career in a variety of ways and explore multiple job functions within a variety of disciplines, rather than limit professional development to a linear career ladder.

    A great way to learn about other jobs is to immerse yourself in the company as a whole, and look for opportunities to participate in projects or interests that are outside of your job description. Some companies offer employees the chance to work with different groups and take on new responsibilities, exposing them to other roles from both an upward and lateral perspective. For example, BASF offers leadership development programs to help employees master new skills and discover additional talents. We organize these programs as rotational assignments, which provide entry-level hires with diverse working experiences. This is a good way to build their skills and professional network through cross-business training programs in areas such as marketing, engineering and supply chain management.

    Get creative

    Previous generations typically followed a linear career plan. However, today’s workforce seeks career experiences that are diverse, engaging and innovative. BASF offers unique non-linear career journeys, described as “career roadmaps” rather than “career paths.” For example, a manufacturing engineer working in plastics can use his or her product knowledge to switch over to a marketing position. Mid- or senior-level employees in the same field may have had very different career journeys that landed them in similar positions.

    It’s important to take ownership of your career goals, rather than adhering to the conventional belief that you need to perform at a certain level to reach a certain role by a particular age. Businesses today are empowering employees to embrace the freedom to creatively pursue their career goals. Through formal mentoring programs along with advanced training and education opportunities, companies are helping employees shape their aspirations and continue to develop their skills both on and off the job.

    It’s important to have regular conversations with your supervisor to set career goals for yourself and track your performance. If you discover a passion in an area outside your particular realm, see how you can work together to integrate new responsibilities into your role or transition into a new position.

    The STEM industry offers great flexibility to explore new interests and opportunities on and off the job. If you are an entry-level employee, be sure to keep an open mind and be willing to try new things. You may be surprised by where your career takes you.

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • Beyond the hammer and hard hat: Don’t overlook unique career opportunities in construction industry

    October 18, 2016 by
    jobs in the construction industry

    Photo courtesy of Stockunlimited.com

    Are you an entry-level job seeker looking in accounting or finance, information technology, human resources, project management, engineering, customer service, or administration? Are you a woman or minority seeking an industry with career growth and upward mobility?

    Then look no further than a career in the construction industry. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the construction industry to see an employment growth of 13.6 percent, or almost 520,000 new jobs by the year 2024. Companies across the country are seeking recent college grads to fill open positions, but old school stereotypes about the type of jobs and skills needed to succeed in the construction industry still exist – and that causes many recent college grads and entry-level job seekers to overlook careers in the construction industry.

    Tim Mayer, Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company (KA), understands those challenges and stereotypes, and he and other industry professionals are working diligently to change the perception and awareness about opportunities in construction.

    Breaking down construction industry stereotypes

    Kraus Anderson has about 500 employees, is based in Minnesota, and has a wide variety of divisions, but is primarily known for its commercial building division. When recruiting for open positions, Mayer and team face many of the same stereotypes as other construction companies across the country.

    “The biggest misconception is one of men in hard hats swinging hammers and providing other labor,” says Mayer. “This is obviously a big part of what is needed in the industry, but also neglects the need for highly-educated and trained people in the construction and support roles listed above. In actuality, the construction industry is really a service industry with a focus on building and maintaining relationships.”

    Tips for recent college grads seeking a career in the construction industry

    Mayer says current college students and recent college grads seeking opportunities in the construction industry should research a company where they are interested in working at to find out about internships, and current job openings. The Kraus Anderson college recruiting program focuses on project and field engineer internships, and has also hired interns in accounting and HR role, pending on need. The company has developed relationships with about 13 colleges and universities to help fill internship roles throughout the company.

    “I think there are some major misconceptions about careers in the construction industry that I have seen proven wrong time and time again in my over five years in the construction industry,” says Mayer. “I think most people would be surprised to learn that construction is also a very well paying industry, with an entrepreneurial spirit, where development and increased responsibility are readily available to those willing to learn and stretch their skills.”

    Mayer is the prime example. He works in the construction industry, but he fills an important human resources leadership role in that industry. He received a B.A. in History from Saint John’s University in Collegeville, MN., and an M.A.in Human Resources and Industrial Relations from University of Minnesota’s Industrial Relations Center at the Carlson School of Management. Prior to KA, Mayer worked at Mortenson Construction, where he served as senior talent acquisition specialist.  He was also a senior professional recruiter for Manpower Professional.

    “Even though I have never built a project, I take great pride in pointing out landmark projects that the company has built,” says Mayer. “There is a real pride with the tangible and long lasting nature of our end products. The value of our work to society can never be underestimated as it is always visible.”

    Women and minorities encouraged to apply

    As for those seeking opportunities to wear the hard hat and swing a hammer – those opportunities are also available, and KA and other construction companies are working hard to attract more women into construction opportunities. There are many local and national organizations that partner with construction firms to help promote opportunities for women in construction and the trades. The National Association of Women in Construction is a network for professional women in the field of construction.  The Washington Women in Trades Association was created for women working in the trades to gather and share information. Tradeswomen, Inc., is one of California’s first organizations for women in the trades and one of its goals is to recruit more women into construction and related non-traditional trades. Just about every state has an organization that supports careers for women and minorities in construction and the trades. Kraus Anderson is active in sponsoring and partnering with women’s campus organizations, as well as growing their partnership with the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

    “We have a variety of initiatives to continue to build diversity into our workforce with recruiting efforts targeted toward women, minorities, veterans, and others underrepresented in our field,” says Mayer. “These efforts not only target recent grads and experienced hires, but build deeper foundations through community involvement and support of organizations that reach students in elementary school to continue to build the notion that construction is a great field.”

    Mayer continued: “I think old stereotypes persist, because there was some truth to them for such a long time. We realize that different educational backgrounds, skill sets, approaches, and life perspectives bring great value to our ability to deliver projects now and into the future.”

    Soft skills crucial to success in construction industry

    What do recruiters look for when hiring recent college grads in the construction industry? Soft skills stand out, says Mayer.

    “Relationships are the cornerstone of our business, and because of that we seek candidates that can effectively communicate and coordinate/lead/manage large groups to foster these lasting relationships focused on solving problems,” says Mayer. “It is a given that a candidate needs to have a core set of construction skills to work in this industry, but the soft skills are the true differentiators that we seek. In today’s market, the candidates that have these skills are typically well taken care of and happy where they’re at. To get these candidates in the mix we are focusing on leveraging employee referrals and building a strong employment brand.”

    Recent college grads, don’t overlook careers in the construction industry. It’s a great place to build a career. Get a jump start on learning about careers in the construction industry by signing up for personalized construction industry job alerts here. We’ll send you new job leads tailored to your interests and preferences and save you the trouble of searching for them on a regular basis.

    For more job seeker tips and advice visit our blog and follow us on LinkedInFacebookTwitter, and YouTube.

     

    Featuring Tim Mayer, Kraus Anderson, on careers in the construction industry. Jobs in the construction industry.

    Tim Mayer is Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company.

    About Tim Mayer
    Tim Mayer is Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company (KA) where he is responsible for creating and leading the company’s end-to-end hiring strategy. Mayer is strategically implementing a proactive strategy to attract top talent for KA’s immediate needs and build a pipeline for future needs, as the company grows. He applies a big-picture approach to provide an excellent candidate experience, while recruiting managers, grooming company leaders and providing a seamless transition as long-time employees retire.

     

  • The hidden problem with big data

    October 17, 2016 by

    1547174HR has long measured recruitment success. Now, in the age of “big data”, we are generating so much more to measure. One benefit of analyzing big data is that with more information we’ll have better decision-making and reduce the stubborn subjectivity that comes with using human brains.

    Right?

    We should be cautious to assume that human bias will disappear just because we have more analytical tools at hand. In fact, big data can expose our bias and force you to walk the walk. Once you track all those numbers, some unconscious bias and unintended discrimination may emerge and will now be in plain sight. Ultimately, this accountability is a great step forward in recruitment. You’ll just want to make sure your company is ready to respond. Here are three examples of where it’s wise to examine your data practices.

    Scraping personal data from online sources. It wouldn’t be too hard to discover a candidate’s race or sexual orientation, given how much personal trace we all leave on the Internet. We’d love to assume those factors make no difference, but too many studies have shown otherwise. Some minority job applicants have even resorted to “whitening” their resumes. A study published this year showed that minority applicants were more successful if they deleted information from their resume that hinted at their race, for example, if they attended a Historically Black College or were a member of Hispanic professional association.

    Key word searching. Keyword searching can be a great way to sort out quality candidates among the thousands of real or potential applicants. However, employers must “apply the same rigor that they would use when creating job advertisements. For example, avoid any terms that could be considered directly or indirectly discriminatory (e.g., ‘‘recent graduate,’’ ‘‘highly experienced.’).”

    Hiring tests. Many companies give candidates a test at the interview stage to help them make decisions based on qualitative data. It sounds great, and can be, if it’s administered fairly. If you use these tests, you must use them for all applicants. And you must—gasp!—actually pay attention to the data. For example, it wouldn’t be fair to only give the test to minority candidates (this happened), or ignore White candidates’ bad test results (this happened too).

    Using big data can be used to make good hires. Just don’t forget to be honest with yourself. If you analyze a big pool of data to select qualified candidates, and they all end up being of one race and one gender, this is a sign you may have accidentally inserted your own bias. Go back to the steps in your process. Ask yourself, “Are my words or actions appealing to only certain demographics?” (This recruiting tech company uses their own big data to help you look at wording in your job postings, for example.) As one of America’s most popular economists, Stephen Dubner of Freakonomics fame, puts it:

    We believe that if you get a pile of data representing a million decisions, that that’s better than asking three people what decisions they made. While I very much believe that to be true, and I very much applaud all the instincts for all of us to work with data in aggregate to distill the biggest truths, I also know that we’re humans and that …we’re biased in a lot of ways.