Posted September 09, 2015 by

Women in the Workplace Bring Diversity

Women in today’s workplace continue to reach new heights. However, they are still striving for advancement in areas such as leadership. While men are typically hired more often for executive jobs, some employers may be underestimating what women can offer if hired for these positions.

To help explore these issues, College Recruiter is hosting a College Recruiting Bootcamp on LGBT and other diversity hiring issues on Tuesday, September 29th at the Twilio headquarters in San Francisco. Join us.

Prior to that event, we’ll publish the opinions from a number of talent acquisition and recruiting leaders about why and how employers should diversify their workforces. In today’s article, Dr. Ya-wen Yang of Wake Forest University School of Business shares her thoughts on research concerning the affects of gender diversity in leadership in the workplace.

dr. ya-wen yang

Dr. Ya-Wen Yang, Associate Professor of Accounting at Wake Forest University School of Business

“Studies have found that women and men make ethical decisions differently, and that overall, women are more ethical and less likely to take risks than men,” she says. “But for gender diversity to fully benefit a company, there needs to be a critical mass of women in both executive roles, like the CFO, and governance roles, like directors.”

“Our findings are consistent with other studies and show how much the gender of the person in a leadership role affects the behavior of the board and their decision-making process,” says Yang.

“The CFO is still a male-dominated position. The percentage of female CFOs in the S&P 500 is only 10 percent,” says Yang. “If the people who make executive hiring decisions understand the benefits of hiring women in these roles, we might see that change in the near future.”

This research is part of a working paper coauthored with Andrea Kelton at Wake Forest University School of Business and Allison Evans at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington.

Ya-Wen Yang is an associate professor of accounting at Wake Forest University School of Business. Her research interests include executive compensation, corporate governance, corporate lobbying and international financial accounting and reporting.

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