Posted January 28, 2011 by

Why Some Employers are Hesitant to Announce Entry Level Job Opportunities

Most recent college graduates understand that competition for entry level jobs is stiff, especially in a recession. While there are jobs out there, some are being hidden by employers for a couple of different reasons. These reasons should persuade graduates to be more proactive in their job searches if they aren’t already.

According to one career consultant, employers are hesitant to make entry level job opportunities known because
1) they don’t have enough time to view a pile of resumes and
2) they don’t want to risk hiring the wrong candidate for a certain job.
As far as being flooded with resumes, it could be that employers simply want to engage more with graduates beyond their resumes (see A Perspective on Resumes in College Recruiting). The second reason has more to do with who employers trust to help them find the best candidates for the positions they want to fill. Instead of advertising the jobs as they normally would, employers are more comfortable talking to their own network of people who have a better understanding of the type of candidates they need. This makes sense, as employers want to make a good investment in someone for the short-term and the long-term.
So, what can graduates do to position themselves better for entry level job opportunities? Our expert says not to just focus on networking, but also relationship building with former co-workers and other people. This will allow both parties to understand each other, and potentially, become valuable resources to each other, for example, as references (see References Who Can Help You Get an Entry Level Job).
Now you know why some jobs are hard to find, college graduates, but they do exist. Be proactive in your job search, and the employers may just find you.
Information provided by Terese Corey Blanck.
Source
Campus Career Counselor – April 2009

Originally posted by William Frierson

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Posted January 28, 2011 by

Why Some Employers are Hesitant to Announce Entry Level Job Opportunities

Most recent college graduates understand that competition for entry level jobs is stiff, especially in a recession. While there are jobs out there, some are being hidden by employers for a couple of different reasons. These reasons should persuade graduates to be more proactive in their job searches if they aren’t already.

According to one career consultant, employers are hesitant to make entry level job opportunities known because
1) they don’t have enough time to view a pile of resumes and
2) they don’t want to risk hiring the wrong candidate for a certain job.
As far as being flooded with resumes, it could be that employers simply want to engage more with graduates beyond their resumes (see A Perspective on Resumes in College Recruiting). The second reason has more to do with who employers trust to help them find the best candidates for the positions they want to fill. Instead of advertising the jobs as they normally would, employers are more comfortable talking to their own network of people who have a better understanding of the type of candidates they need. This makes sense, as employers want to make a good investment in someone for the short-term and the long-term.
So, what can graduates do to position themselves better for entry level job opportunities? Our expert says not to just focus on networking, but also relationship building with former co-workers and other people. This will allow both parties to understand each other, and potentially, become valuable resources to each other, for example, as references (see References Who Can Help You Get an Entry Level Job).
Now you know why some jobs are hard to find, college graduates, but they do exist. Be proactive in your job search, and the employers may just find you.
Information provided by Terese Corey Blanck.
Source
Campus Career Counselor – April 2009

Originally posted by William Frierson

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged