• Make Your Network Work for You

    December 31, 2007 by

    Networking is the art of building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships. Frequently when I coach people who are in a job search and we discuss networking within the context of job search, many will say “Does that really work?” Like anything else, networking requires a bit of practice and finesse, but if done correctly, networking can be an invaluable part of your job search campaign. Here are a few tips to help you develop a network that works for you.

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  • The “What’s Your Salary Expectation?” Question

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    Marshall Loeb mentions in his article that the best way to deal with this issue in an application is to “not answer the question.” Instead, he suggests three options:

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  • What can turn a hiring manager off

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    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    MILWAUKEE, WI — Recently I interviewed several human resources professionals and the recent complaint can be summarized in one HR professional’s comments: “I couldn’t believe it,” she said. “Her husband called and demanded to know why his wife wasn’t hired. I was shocked.”
    Huh? Why didn’t the woman call to follow up on the position herself? This happens time and time again. A wife makes an appointment for the husband, and so on. Hiring authorities respond very negatively to job seekers asking others to do their follow up work. One said, “How do I know the person can even do the job if they can’t even set up their own interview?”
    The consensus, among both HR professionals and recruiters, was that job seekers need to perform their own job search activities, such as scheduling appointments and following up on interviews. The alternative is viewed as a lack of interest or initiative in getting the job.
    Article by Wendy Terwelp, Career Coach, and reprinted from TheCareerNews.com. Get the latest breaking News, Tips and Tools for your job search, Free!

  • The Transfer Transition

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    When he transferred to Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa last fall, Caleb immediately joined the football team and the choir. He’d been a member of both groups at his old school, so getting involved in these activities at his new school was an easy decision. In fact, since Simpson’s football staff had recruited Caleb, they even helped him out when he first arrived on campus.
    You might think Caleb’s transition to Simpson was easy (or at least easier than yours will be!). But Caleb admits that he struggled at first. None of the familiar activities felt the same as they did at his old school. And like most transfer students, he was nervous about meeting new people and about how he would handle his new academic load.

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  • One of the Worst Mistakes that a Student Can Make

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    Students often make a critical mistake that often only catches up to them when they are about to graduate. That is, they often fail to seek relevant work experience…

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  • Five Reasons to Send Thank You Letters After an Interview

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    Thank you letters are an excellent self-marketing tool and a critical component of your job search strategy. The time spent crafting a targeted thank you letter after an interview will be well spent and can contribute to a more credible and efficient search. Here’s why.

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  • Majoring in Minority Health

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    Not so long ago, topics like minority health disparities and serving the needs of diverse patient populations were rarely taught in nursing classrooms. Today, a growing number of nursing schools are not only incorporating minority health into their curricula, they’re building whole degree programs around it.

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  • Salary Increases in 2008 Expected to Be 4%

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    According to the Compensation Force Blog, 2008 salary increases are expected to average 4%. With that in mind, job seekers should consider strategies for negotiating their total compensation packages that go past the base salary. By negotiating a signing bonus or pro-rated bonus based on individual or company performance, job seekers may be able to barter for a more generous total rewards package. Stock options and company perks like cell phones and laptops when appropriate may also be requested to help “sweeten the pot”. Companies will only budge so far when negotiating a performance increase. Try to negotiate more of the “extras” before you take the job to help compensate for some of the “average” salary increases you may be offered along the way.
    Article by Barbara Safani and courtesy of Career Solvers. Barbara Safani is the owner of Career Solvers, has over ten years of experience in career management, recruiting, executive coaching, and organizational development. She is a triple certified resume writer and frequent contributor to numerous career-related publications

  • Salary Talk: Should I have gotten a bigger raise with my HR promotion?

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    Q. I started with my present company in Raleigh, NC, in February as an HR assistant on a temp-to-hire basis at a salary of $25,000. In March, the company hired me full-time and increased my salary to $28,000.
    At the time I came on board, our HR director resigned. We were without an HR director for about two months. Then the benefits generalist turned in her resignation. I took the initiative to learn her job in less than two weeks.
    At my performance review, the new HR director complimented me on taking the initiative to learn the benefits generalist’s job and on how quickly I caught on. She then promoted me to benefits administrator. I was very excited, but when she told me that my new salary would be $29,124, my jaw almost dropped with disappointment.
    I am working toward my associate’s degree in human resources and I am in my last semester. I’m a hard worker and a quick learner. Am I being underpaid? If so, how should I go about handling this?

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  • Resume Writing Tip: Using the “Header and Footer” Function in MSWord

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    The “Header and Footer” function in Microsoft Word can be accessed under “View” in the top link bar. That feature should be used when designing the layout of your resume to include your name in the header and the page number (if your resume has more than one page) in the footer (choose page number and number of pages). This will allow your name to appear on the top of all the pages and will make sure that your pages are numbered.
    Many job seekers tend to ignore that basic function, yet it can make a big difference.
    Article courtesy of WorkBloom, an employment blog incorporating a comprehensive career resources section, including the largest database of professionally written resume and cover letter samples on the Web.