• Changing Your Mind About a Job Offer

    November 30, 2007 by

    Over on the SittingXLegged blog, there is a post about candidates who accept a job and then back out of the offer in order to take another, higher paying position. Rescinding an offer carries significant risk, because by doing so your integrity may be questioned and your reputation damaged.
    Sometimes candidates take jobs that they are not completely satisfied with and continue to look in the hopes that something better will come along. A better strategy is to negotiate an offer so the final offer is attractive to you and compelling enough for you to make a serious commitment to the new position. If you are not sure if you want a position because you are simultaneously courting other employers, either continue to negotiate or ask for more time before making your final decision. In the long run, this is a much better strategy than taking a job and then changing your mind.
    Article by Barbara Safani and courtesy of Career Solvers. Barbara Safani is the owner of Career Solvers, has over ten years of experience in career management, recruiting, executive coaching, and organizational development. She is a triple certified resume writer and frequent contributor to numerous career-related publications

  • Rivalries with Co-Workers Getting Out of Hand?

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    Stephen Viscusi, author of “On the Job: How to Make it in the Real World of Work,” gives some tips on how to face backstabbing co-workers:

    • Don’t be afraid to confront the co-worker directly.
    • Avoid using e-mails, as they could be turned against you eventually.
    • Keep the conversation short and professional.
    • Choose your battles.
    • Don’t assume the co-worker will change on his/ her own. That won’t happen.
    • The above being said, avoid falling to the same level as the people that are backstabbing you.

    When Co-Workers Play Dirty, CNN/ CareerBuilder
    Article courtesy of WorkBloom, an employment blog incorporating a comprehensive career resources section, including the largest database of professionally written resume and cover letter samples on the Web.

  • Why Blog When You Are in a Job Search?

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    Resumes are great tools for introducing yourself to potential employers and recruiters. But resumes do little to foster the relationship between you and decision makers in your field. Blogging gives you the opportunity to consistently authenticate the skill set demonstrated on your resume and continue a conversation with the people who need to know who you are. If you’ve been thinking about incorporating a blog into your self-marketing strategy, below are eight blogging tips to help you move forward.
    Setting Up A Blog
    A number of services are available for setting up a blog quickly and easily. Hosting services like Blogger or Typepad provide formatting templates and blog publishing systems like MoveableType and WordPress help users produce custom-designed sites.

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  • Art Squad: A Temp Agency with a Twist

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    Catering to the Creative Type

    Provided By: Associated Content, Inc.

    It’s not your typical employment office.

    Art Squad recruits and places creative professionals in freelance, contract, and full-time positions with offices in Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin, and Houston.

    Specialties include creative and art directors, marketing professionals, graphic, web, and multimedia designers, illustrators, public relations professionals, production artists, presentation specialists, editors, proofreaders, writers, project managers, media planners, buyers, and account services.

    Two years minimum of industry-related experience and demonstrated graphic skills are required.

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  • Holidays: A good time of year to find a job

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    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    CHICAGO, IL — Are you about to start a job search or in the midst of looking for a new job? Are you thinking about waiting or putting your job search on hold? If so, think again. Contrary to popular opinion, this is a good time of year to find a job. Employers don’t stop hiring just because it’s the holidays.

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  • Not a Good Time to Graduate in China

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    Approximately 4.95 million graduates entered the job market this year in China. It is estimated that 30% of those graduates will have difficulties finding work. What does this mean? How about a happy face for employers?
    Please click here to see a photo of a job fair in China literally flooded with new grads.
    Article courtesy of WorkBloom, an employment blog incorporating a comprehensive career resources section, including the largest database of professionally written resume and cover letter samples on the Web.

  • No Money, But Still Want Employees Happy?

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    Work is more than just receiving a paycheck. We spend a lot of time at the workplace, so working in a good environment is important. For companies that do not have the means to reward their employees monetarily, they should acknowledge their employees’ contribution and make them feel that the company’s success is a group effort.

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  • Step Up Your Job Search During the Holiday Season

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    When I counsel clients on their job search during the holiday season, they often tell me that they plan to put their search on hold because they think that everyone is out of town and no one is hiring during this season.
    Actually, December can be a great time to step up your search campaign because so many applicants believe this misperception of the market. When people drop out of the job market during the holiday season, there’s an opportunity for you to accelerate your search in a climate with decreased competition. Below are four ways to increase your visibility in 2007 to prepare for a more robust search in 2008.

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  • Keep it simple when interviewing

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    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    CINCINNATI, OH — Use clear, strong, direct language to get your point across quickly and crisply. Keep sentences, paragraphs, and lists short. Curb any tendency to speak for more than 90-120 seconds without interacting with your interviewer. Time yourself, then listen. If you’ve been practicing a 3-minute introduction, you’ll be surprised at how LONG that is when you’re listening.
    I think some of the over-communicating comes from fear that if you leave something out, you’ll miss an important point that the reader or interviewer is looking for. Relax. Talk about what you’ve done and how it’s been valuable (more profit, less cost, happier customers and employees, greater market share, and so forth) – and be specific! Don’t spout generalities – tell stories!
    Even better – listen, ask questions, and react to what you learn. Make it more about “them” and less about “you.” You’ll position yourself as a partner committed to solving problems – and isn’t that what employers are looking for?
    Article by Louise Kursmark, YourBestImpression.com, and reprinted from TheCareerNews.com. Get the latest breaking News, Tips and Tools for your job search, Free!

  • Is The Therapy Field Dominated By Women?

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    I was reading an OT Forum on OccupationalTherapist.com this morning and a great question was posed. It comes from a student who is looking into becoming an Occupational Therapist and has noticed that the field might be lacking in the testosterone arena.

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