• Don’t forget the power of old friends and co-workers

    September 29, 2007 by

    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    BOULDER, CO — People talk about networking, and why it’s so critical in your job search. They always say the same things. “Meet lots of people.” “Go to networking events.” Those things are fine, but the new people you meet in droves during your job search can only do so much for you. They only know a little bit about you, for one thing. And they haven’t worked next to you. And they can’t recommend you as a trusted friend, because you aren’t one.
    Of course you can make a great contact through networking with strangers. But the fact is, a person who worked with you 10 years ago and remembers your prowess at something-or-other is loads more valuable to you in your job search (not to mention as a friend in general) than someone who just met you last week. Still, we have a way of relying on our new friends and neglecting our old ones during a job search.

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  • Top reason why new hires bail: Unclear expectations

    September 28, 2007 by

    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    ALEXANDRIA, VA — Unrealistic expectations about their job and their new organization is a major reason why as many as one-fourth of new hires leave within the first year, says a survey of more than 2,000 HR and training executives.
    Other reasons include: failure to grasp how things get done around the organization (38.7%), poor communications with an immediate supervisor (33.1%), failure to develop a sense of belonging and purpose (26.4%), inadequate technical skills (22.7%), Not understanding the link between the job and organizational goals (20.9%), failure to connect with key employees (17.8%), inability to quickly establish trust and credibility (12.9%), and poor people skills, (12.9%)

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  • Salary Talk: What if a salary history is “required,” and I don’t send one?

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    Q. In job announcements in the newspaper and elsewhere I sometimes see “send resume and salary history to…” If I respond, I respectfully decline submission of the salary history information until I get more serious interest from the prospective employer. However, I have yet to get an interview from any of these employers, in spite of my apparent qualifications, which in some cases have been significant. I think my salary history is irrelevant, as I have recently completed a master’s degree and attained a related certification, though I haven’t yet worked in any position that called for these qualifications. Am I hurting my chances by not providing this information? How does one best handle this matter?

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  • What To Do If . . . You Have A Learning Disability

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    If you have a learning disability and you’re planning to go to college, here’s some good news: most colleges and universities provide a wide range of services to help learning-disabled students succeed in the classroom and have a full and complete college experience. How can you be sure that the colleges you’re applying to have what you need? Here are some tips.

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  • Virtual Networking: Does It Live Up to the Hype?

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    Unless you’ve been on a remote tropical island or in a coma the past several years, you have heard that the emergence of the Web as a place for social and professional networking is well underway. It seems like a long time ago when the Internet was perceived by and large as a place where people researched information, played games, or made purchases in a very solitary fashion.
    In an ExecuNet newsletter article this week, Robyn Greenspan observes, “Fast-forward and the pendulum has not only swung in the other direction, it has spun off its hinge.” Today there is a tremendous amount of interactivity via blogging, user groups (such as Yahoo groups), and forums on specialty and professional websites, while the use of networking sites such as LinkedIn, Ryze, and others is literally exploding. In a recent study, LinkedIn was shown to be one of the fastest-growing Web 2.0 sites, reporting more than 12 million members. (“Web 2.0” refers to a new breed of interactive websites that allow users to create their own content.) Ryze, a business networking site, boasts more than 500,000 members in more than 200 countries.

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  • What makes a resume scream: Don’t hire me

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    Reprinted courtesy of TheCareerNews.com
    New York, NY — How much personal information should you include in a resume? The question evidently baffles lots of people. “Your resume speaks volumes about you,” notes V. Michael Prencipe, a principal at HR Staffing Solutions. “Unfortunately, sometimes it screams, Don’t hire me.”
    Prencipe also counsels against saving your resume with unprofessional names like ‘ssseexxxyyy_2006’ and sending it as an attachment. He cautions against listing your reply e-mail address as something like ‘[email protected]’ – and yes, he reports, those are both real-life examples, as are countless resumes that detail the reasons why job seekers were fired from previous jobs (which is information not suitable for resumes).

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  • Salary Talk: Does my international salary history jeopardize future earnings?

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    Q. I had five years of experience as financial accountant in private industry in the United States before moving to Hong Kong last year. My annual earnings as a manager were US$43,000. The staff accountant job I hold in Hong Kong equates to US$28,000. Besides the job title, the salary difference is also because of the different living standard, tax rates, and salary trends between the United States and Hong Kong. After taking these considerations into account, I estimate my salary in Hong Kong to be equal to US$40K.
    Now I am returning to the United States and my low salary looks awkward on my resume compared to what I earned in former jobs. How can I tell the recruiters that my latest salary looks low only because of the different living standard, not because I am unable to attain a higher salary? Should I put my estimate of $40,000, or my actual salary of $28,000 on the resume?

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  • Getting in: What will an admissions committee look for in me?

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    Student anxiety is an inevitable by-product of the college admissions process–a kind of emotional smokestack emission that hangs over admissions-related activities. This anxiety is largely unavoidable, as students send themselves off in the mail to be evaluated by admissions officers. The results are inescapably public–back from the admissions office come fat envelopes or skinny envelopes. Is this system fair? Are the decisions more whimsical than reflective of a student’s talents?

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  • City of Minneapolis Jobs

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    In a recent budget proposal, Minneapolis Mayor, R. T. Rybak, introduced a plan that he hopes will focus spending on public safety. The new plan calls for money to be devoted to fighting gang graffiti, truancy, youth violence, and bus transportation for inner city kids to various community programs. To accomplish these goals Rybak’s budget called for the addition of 18 Minneapolis jobs for officers on the city’s police department in 2008.
    According to the StarTribune.com. Rybak’s political opponents have been critical of the fact that he has yet to hire up to the 893 officers that were allowed by the previous budget. In his defense, Rybak says that some positions that might have been filled by uniformed officers have been converted into jobs for Minneapolis civilians. At this time the city has 864 individuals on the police force, which includes 9 officers added in the last week.
    The proposed budget will increase public safety spending by roughly 4 percent, from $192 million to $200 million. This increase also includes the addition of a few other Minneapolis jobs. For example, 4 individuals will be hired to assist in answering 911 calls. The plan is that this will decrease the amount of time it takes to respond to emergency calls, which could potentially save lives.
    In addition to the 22 new jobs in Minneapolis mentioned, there may soon be additional positions announced. This conclusion can be drawn from the fact that Rybak’s plan to provide transportation for the inner city young to various programs could mean increase in the number of Minneapolis bus drivers needed.
    In many area’s there are waiting lists for individuals who desire to join either the police force or local fire department. Due to the fact that these jobs often have a high turn over rate, such a list is necessary to keep these departments working at full staff. For those interested in one of the new Minneapolis employment soon to be opening up, getting on this list as soon as possible is imperative. Even if an individual is not hired on when these positions become available, it is likely they may receive a job offer at a latter time.

  • Justice Department to Investigate Its Hiring Process

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    The Probe Comes After Monica Goodling’s Admission That She Asked Applicants About Their Political Beliefs

    Provided By: Associated Content, Inc.

    On Wednesday, the Justice Department announced it is expanding its probe to include the departments hiring practices. The statement comes one week after Monica Goodling, an former aide to Attorney General Alberto, admitted to Congress that she asked job applicants questions about their politics.

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