• No Experience, No Job? Not Always the Case

    April 30, 2007 by

    By Teena Rose
    Get a monster of a graduate resume with GraduateResumes.com
    With a strong economy, low unemployment rate and a job market flush with opportunity, it should be a good summer for college graduates jump-starting their careers.
    According to jobsite CareerBuilder.com’s new survey, “College Hiring 2007”, 79 percent of hiring managers are planning on hiring recent college graduates this year, up from 70 percent in 2006. With 24 percent of hiring managers expected to hire more recent college grads at higher salaries than last year, the entry-level job market looks bright.
    With that sunny outlook in mind, there’s a paradox that many college graduates face. Employers want experience. College grads usually don’t have. What to do?
    This is the common Catch-22 of the entry-level job. Of course, 22-year-olds fresh out of college have spent their time in school, so on-the-job exposure is going to be non-existent. The part-time job at Taco Bell during the summer is not likely going to be relevant to that hard-earned degree in marketing.
    The first thing the college grad must understand is that employers don’t simply base hiring on the amount of years you’ve spent in a particular field, especially with entry-level jobs. Recruiters looking for entry-level employees are equally concerned with finding candidates who are diamonds in the rough. Their long-term potential, interpersonal skills and leadership abilities are just as important as applicable experience.
    Just because you’ve spent the past four years in college polishing up that economics degree doesn’t mean you won’t have some of the know-how employer’s desire. The internship is the key experience tool college students use to acquire the skills of their desired field.
    Internships are in an opportunity for students to apply their classroom comprehension into real-time situations. This allows the student to receive hands-on training while testing the waters of his or her own career choice.
    Employers love college graduates who have gone through an internship in a related field, but there’s more they’ll be looking at on the resume than an entry-level job seeker might be unaware of. Any activities during those years of college that can be translated into the everyday working world are valuable. Volunteer work, student government and even team sports are excellent indicators that a potential hire has the ability to work together with others and possesses leadership qualities.
    Whether you’re captain of the basketball team, student body president or volunteered on a school political campaign, companies are always looking for campus involvement. The way a job recruiter sees it, someone involved in a handful of activities while pursuing a college degree is someone who can manage time effectively. And using time wisely on the job means a better bottom line for any company.
    Once the internship and campus activities have been applied, there are still more skills that shouldn’t be left out. Any know-how gained that can be used on the job is important for a recruiter to hear. If your desire is to be a Web designer, the technical skills acquired during the past four years and mastery of different types of software is vital. If you’re a communications major but want to be an event planner, experience putting together parties, fund-raisers or other exhibitions are relevant talents.
    With thousands of entry-level jobs out there this summer, college graduates simply shouldn’t take their experiences for granted. Whatever company you’ve targeted, do the research first, find out what their culture is, and leverage every possible amount of past experience you have when applying for the position.

  • Paper Resume … So Old School

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    By Teena Rose
    Get a monster graduate resume with GraduateResumes.com
    In 1986 when a college graduate embarked upon their first job search in the professional world, the first task was to break out the Remington typewriter, grab some fresh sheets of paper and start plucking away at creating a resume. Just 20 years later, it seems like a prehistoric way to put together a resume.
    The typewriter went the way of other prehistoric creatures, replaced by the personal computer, which essentially creates resumes the same way a typewriter did, with fewer errors and more efficiency. Now, the latest technology is again threatening the way job seekers put together their resumes, making the emailed MS Word document, once thought of as cutting edge, an endangered species.
    Several high-tech alternatives have become players in the resume market, including Web resumes, PDFs, Flash and even video resumes called “talkers.”
    The Web-based resume is becoming extremely popular for those in the high-tech and creative industries who also have portfolios to show off. These Web-ready HTML resumes can be packaged with samples like art work, advertising pages or Web creations at a moments notice, allowing employers to view stats with one click of a link. The resume never gets lost, and can be viewed by any employer in any city, 24 hours a day. Once it’s on the Web, your work is pretty much over. No folding up your resume and stuffing it into an envelope, not to mention buying stamps. Even if you don’t have your own Web space, there are many websites that offer free space to post your resume.
    The PDF resume is also gaining popularity. It’s similar to a Word resume, but provides a sort of digital coating. PDF, which stands for Portable Document Format, lets resume writers produce a secure and reliable document that can’t be altered once it hits someone else’s email inbox. If a Word document is saved as a PDF, it retains all the original content, including images, graphics, etc. On the receiving end, a potential employer must have the Adobe Reader to view the resume, but that’s typically not an issue since the software is free and a basic component for most computer users.
    Flash resumes are adding some spice to the job-hunting world. Flash is brand-name software used for creating interactive website and other digital experiences. The Flash resume can be a bit like making a movie, and has the potential to add as many bells and whistles as you like. The creative industries are where these resumes are a big hit, although they can be simple and straightforward enough to appeal to every employer.
    There are a handful of services online that provide all the templates and formatting for a Flash resume. You just have to fill in the information. When applying for jobs, however, you don’t email employers your resume since the files would be too large. Instead, job seekers should get Web space and upload the Flash resume as part of their online presentation.

  • Want Traffic? Write for the Recruiting Blogswap!

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    The Recruiting Blogswap is starting to really take off. The number of articles published last week was up 50 percent over the previous week and would have been much higher had all of the articles been published as soon as they were received.
    Want more traffic to your recruiting blog or career site? Submit an article to the Recruiting Blogswap. It is free. Your article will run on other recruiting blogs and that will both generate traffic directly from the readers of those blogs and improve your search engine positioning for all of the pages on your site because your article will include a link to your site in your byline in close proximity to your description of your site, in which you should include the keywords that people use most in order to find your site.

  • Gender paygap nears 20% – HOGWASH!

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    I was listening to one of my favorite talk radio show hosts yesterday on XM radio – Larry Elder. Since anyone who is heavily bent to either side of the political dial will probably know who that is, I may have just lost 50percent of my audience, that’s OK. The 50percent who stay around to read may find that they learn something, if they keep an open mind.
    You see, Larry was discussing a new study that had just come out (and he compared it with an older study) about the disparity in pay between men and women. Of course the study was backed by scientific method and statistical analysis. I’ve always believed the old saying that there are lies, damned lies, then statistics. This report reminded me of that fact.

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  • Make the Most of Your White Space

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    Every manager has white space in his or her day. Successful managers take advantage of their white space and use it as a time to brainstorm new ideas or work on things outside their normal job scope.

    What exactly is “white space”? White space are those gaps in your calendar in between meetings and other planned activities. Many managers fill that time by replying to e-mail or making phone calls. And while keeping in communication with people is certainly important, it’s not always the best use of white space. In fact, those managers who are truly successful and fulfilled use their white space to connect their personal passions with their professional goals.

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  • Tips for Talking with your Boss about Tuition Assistance

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    A Valuable and Often Overlooked Benefit!
    Henry L. Doherty, an American businessman, once said, “Get over the idea that only children should spend their time in study. Be a student so long as you still have something to learn, and this will mean all your life.” With a growing number of adults continuing their education every year, businesses are embracing this idea of life-long learning.
    According to the Society for Human Resources Management 2003 Benefits Survey, 79% of employers provide educational assistance to employees taking college classes. The survey also found 72% of employers offer undergraduate educational assistance and 69% of employers offer graduate education assistance. Although the numbers show most companies help pay for education, what do you do if you’re employer isn’t among the majority?

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  • Good Things Come to Those Who Wait‚Ķand Back Off from Time to Time

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    Imagine that you’ve just purchased a new car. Your first “real” car, you’re proud of the time you spent reading up, really doing your homework, and taking to find the right model in the right price range for you. Now, imagine that you’ve just picked up your friend for a ride in your new car, and before you’ve barely pulled out of her driveway, she proceeds to tell you about the car she thinks you should have purchased. She tells you how you could get better mileage if you’d just consider redesigning the engine, and how she’s surprised you didn’t get a car that was red, and on…and on she goes. In the meantime, you’re ready to push her out the door…never mind the fact that you happen to be going 50 mph.

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  • Why We Don’t Offer Free Trials

    April 27, 2007 by

    We’ve found time-and-time again that when we offer anything for free that the only organizations that take us up on the offer are those who:

    1. Would never purchase anything so they’re actually more akin to expenses than clients and not too many organizations want more expenses. We get calls every day from headhunters asking for free trials of our resume bank even though we offer a free demo that allows them to search and view as many resumes as they want but blocks out the contact information for the candidates. When we offer that instead, those asking for the free trials tend to disappear. Why? Because they weren’t really interested in the trial. They were just interested in the free.
    2. Those who intend to purchase something but because they’ve made no investment in the free trial, they end up not investing their time either so the trial is doomed to fail. These are typically corporate recruiters. If they spend even $350 with us for a month of resume searching, they need to show results to their managers. But if they spend $0 with us, their managers often aren’t even aware that the recruiter has signed up so there’s no pressure to use the package. If they don’t invest their time, they don’t get results. If they don’t get results, they don’t buy at the end of the trial period.
  • Job Search for College Grads

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    Interesting insight from Experience Inc’s fifth annual College Graduate Survey.
    More than 2,800 graduating seniors took Experience’s online poll, and nearly 50% of those who had already started their job searches at the time of the survey were still looking. The results, released in early April, also showed that only 22% of these students had offers in hand. Another 15% planned to continue on to graduate school, and 10% had yet to begin searching.
    So, college grad, where are you?
    Dennis Smith
    T-Mobile USA
    Sr. Manager, Recruiting
    WirelessJobs.com – blog

  • 10 Tips for Finding a New Job

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    1. Take stock – (Know Yourself)
    If you know your strengths and weaknesses and what you want in a career, then you have a much better chance of finding your perfect job. Finding that dream position starts with understanding your personality, values and what drives you. Taking a career and personality assessment is a huge first step towards optimizing your personal career path. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator assessment is the most widely used personality instrument. More than 2 million worldwide assessments are performed each year by job seekers, professionals, and organizations, including 89 of the Fortune 100. Take a Free Personality Test now to find out what motivates you and find the perfect job today.

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