• Are Temp Agencies Right for You?

    January 31, 2007 by

    My answer to my own question would depend largely on when one were to have asked me, for I have worked for three different entry level temp agencies. After the first one you would have gotten form me something along the lines of “eh, maybe, they are okay,” a long string of obscenities after the second and finally some positive feedback after number three.
    There are some entry level temp agencies out there that don’t seem to care what is going on so long as they keep geting part of your paycheck. Odds are you do not want to work for one like that-they are most unhelpful and frustrating to deal with. This can’t be emphasized enough; take note of how well the agency communicates with you and how well they listen to you. Were they listening when you told them what you were capable of doing and what you feel comfortable doing? The second one I worked for obviously wasn’t, and that ended up hurting both of us. The third one hooked me up with a job that matched my profile almost perfectly, and everything went smooth as could be. On the other end, how well you commuincate with them can also make or break your work. Even if the agency does have the right job for you and is more than willing to put you there, they can’t get you “your” job if they don’t know who you are. Dishonesty could put you in way over your head.
    If you can find a good agency and are willing to be open, you should be fine at an enrty level temp agency. They can save you a lot of time, effort and frustration while potentially leading to good things in the future. It may not be a sure thing, but what in the job market is? At least this way you get a paid fair tryout instead of some rediculous one-shot dress rehearsal, right? Shop around for different agencies in your area and give it a shot if no offers are coming your way, entry level temp agencies are great for anyone needing experience.

  • Alloy Education Partnership

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    CollegeRecruiter.com and Alloy Education announced an agreement under which scholarship and college information from Alloy’s CareersandColleges.com website will be made available for search on CollegeRecruiter.com. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of job posting advertisements and employment-related articles from CollegeRecruiter.com will now be available for search on CareersandColleges.com. For additional details, check out the press release.

  • Blogging for Corporate Recruiters: Who, What, Where, Why, and How

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    Corporate recruiters who want to blog or are considering blogging take note: Dave Mendoza of JobMachine.net and Kennedy Information are teaming up to present a three part teleseminar. You can attend one, two, or all three sessions or order CD recordings if you are unable to call in at the designated times.
    The first seminar is entitled “An Introduction to Blogging” and is scheduled for Thursday, February 1, 2007. The second seminar is entitled “Employee Blogs: ‘New School’ Employment Branding” and is scheduled for Thursday, February 15, 2007. The third and final seminar is entitled “Evolution of Blogs” and is scheduled for Thursday, March 1.
    Dave is a world class trainer and Kennedy Information is a world class provider of recruiting content, so this should be phenomenal series. Sign up at the Kennedy Information web site.

  • CollegeRecruiter.com and Alloy Education Partner to Offer Students Enhanced Career Information Tools (January 31, 2007 Press Release)

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    (Minneapolis, MN) January 31, 2007 – CollegeRecruiter.com and Alloy Education, a division of Alloy Media + Marketing (NASDQ: ALOY), today announced an agreement under which scholarship and college information from Alloy Education’s CareersandColleges.com website will be made available for search on CollegeRecruiter.com. Moreover, hundreds of thousands of job posting advertisements and employment-related articles from CollegeRecruiter.com will now be available for search on Alloy Education’s CareersandColleges.com.

    “We’re excited to partner with CollegeRecruiter.com in offering our users advanced job search options and valuable content that compliments our existing web properties”, commented Joe Moore, President, Alloy Education. “We’re looking forward to these enhancements and to ensuring students’ optimal experience while navigating our web sites.”

    “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to partner with Alloy Education. This partnership offers incredible breadth and depth of content to visitors across our web sites,” said Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of CollegeRecruiter.com. “Since our launch in 1996, we continue to strive to build a community that benefits the needs of students. We’re extremely excited to finally introduce full access to college and scholarship information through the co-branded CareersandColleges.com search system and to provide enhanced tools for our users during this important time in their lives.”

    About CollegeRecruiter.com

    CollegeRecruiter.com is the highest traffic career site used by job-hunting students and recent graduates and the employers who want to hire them. Three million visitors per month use the CollegeRecruiter.com network of career sites to find part-time positions, summer jobs, internships and career opportunities. CollegeRecruiter.com features tens of thousands of job openings and thousands of pages of employment-related articles and Ask the Experts questions and answers. Further information about CollegeRecruiter.com is available at https://www.collegerecruiter.com/pages/press-room.php.

    About Alloy Education

    Alloy Education is a division of Alloy Media + Marketing (NASDQ: ALOY), a leading pioneer in nontraditional media and marketing services delivering targeted consumer segments. Serving higher education while providing students with options for their future, Alloy Education offers the integrated resources of Alloy Media + Marketing, with our experience in print recruitment, direct marketing, lead generation, custom publishing, brand management, and database leasing. Further information about Alloy Education is available at http://www.AlloyEducation.com/about/index.htm.

    CONTACT INFO:

    CollegeRecruiter.com
    Steven Rothberg
    3109 W 50 St Ste 121
    Minneapolis, MN 55410-2102
    Phone: 800-835-4989
    Fax: 702-537-2227
    [email protected]
    https://www.collegerecruiter.com

    Alloy Education
    Matthew Cashdollar
    120 Wyndhaven Court
    Johnstown, PA 16066
    Phone: 814-266-6272
    Fax: 814-266-6269
    [email protected]
    http://www.AlloyEducation.com

  • The Great Fringe Benefit of Helping Others

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    Scott ShapiroAbout five years ago, I received a call from the then Assistant Director of Career Services at Emory University’s undergraduate business school. Emory, because of its location in Atlanta, is not prime recruiting ground for Minneapolis-based employers. The Assistant Director had met me at a college recruiting conference and thought that I might be willing to help one of his students. That student was just profiled in Business Week and I couldn’t be happier.

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  • Eight Steps To The Right College For You

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    Finding the right college is an art, rather than a science. It takes time, energy, and a willingness to ask yourself some tough questions about what kind of college experience you want and what kind of college is most likely to give it to you. It can’t be reduced to a checklist or chart or formula.
    As a student of color, you will be doing everything everyone else is while looking for a college—and maybe a little bit more. Here are eight steps that will help you explore widely and choose wisely.

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  • My Life as a Bean Raker

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    n high school, Brian Culver of Wheaton, Illinois had a fairly good idea that he wanted to be an English professor. But like most of his teenage friends, when it came to finding a job, he thought he should take the first thing that came along. “I wound up as a ‘bean raker’ at a fast-food taco shop,” says Culver. “My job was to keep the beans from sticking in this giant frying pan—it was as big as my desk. I sure learned some lessons about getting to work on time and saving some money—not to mention how to properly rake beans—but it really wasn’t much of a step toward my dream job.”

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  • References

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    References can have a significant impact on the final hiring decision. Be ready at a moment’s notice to provide potential employers with at least three solid ones.
    Approach only your natural contacts, the people who would unquestionably offer a glowing report about you. You want people who know you well professionally and can relay information about your proficiency, skills, attitudes, and behaviors.
    Consider mentors, bosses, or coworkers in positions of authority. Also look at professors, coaches, or counselors. Steer away from family and friends, who may be biased or unaware of your work habits.

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  • Interview Brainteasers

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    You’ve heard of those brain teaser questions that may well come between you and a job someday. No matter how much you may prepare yourself for a job interview, you may never be completely ready when that interviewer asks you why manhole covers are round. Even that question has been asked so often by now, it’s considered one of the easy ones. Microsoft is partly to blame.
    Ever since the Seattle-based software giant made news a few years ago for asking applicants questions like “How many golfballs does it take to fill a 747?”, more and more companies have been adding their own mindbenders to the interview mix – and it’s not just at software behemoths like Microsoft, but also at consulting firms and investment banks like Goldman Sachs and Smith Barney. Don’t feel prepared just because you’ve got a bulletproof resume and have thoroughly researched the company you’re interviewing for. Be ready for something unorthodox to pop up out of the blue.

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  • The Weakness Question

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    You’re sitting in a conference room or office, face-to-face with the person you most want to impress – your prospective boss – and he or she is asking you, “What is your biggest weakness?” How do you answer a question like that?
    The good news is, it’s a job interview, not a confessional. No one expects you to demonize yourself in hopes of appearing forthright. After all, you are selling yourself and you want the interviewer to buy, not pass.

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