• TEN TIPS TO KNOW WHEN IN COLLEGE

    November 30, 2006 by

    1. Loans are not free money: you do have to pay it back w/ interest. Only take out loans when necessary, not to purchase a new car or clothes. Apply for the Pell Grant, it works in your favor and doesn’t have to be repaid. For more info go to http://www.a-studentloans.com/pell_grants.html
    2. Freshman year is the most vital year in college; it determines whether or not you will be there next year, so take it seriously.
    3. Before signing up for a course with a professor that you don’t know, find out about the professor on RateMyProfessor.com. This site really helps!!! It gives you tips on whom to and not to take for a particular course.
    4. Books: Most schools have a program where they loan out books to you instead of you having to purchase one. You can find out about this in your School’s Student Services Department. Find out what courses you are going to take ahead of time, that way you’ll be the first to sign up for the book loan. Remember; first come – first serve and books are limited.
    5. Withdrawals: It’s not a bad thing to withdrawal from a course so don’t be afraid to use it. It’s better to use it then to fail the course and regret it later on. If you had a bad semester, get a Pardon. That way the school will wipe out that entire semester on your transcript and you’ll have a second chance. This is usually permitted once per student so be wise!
    6. HBCU, Private Schools, or State Universities? In my opinion go to a State University and here’s why:
    A. It’s usually well known and the tuition is cheaper
    B. It’s better to go to an integrated school in lieu of an All-Black school because it determines how you will well work and fit with people of other races.
    C. If you are a minority going to an All-Black school financial aid, scholarships, and grants WILL BE LIMITED!! It’s been rumored that most HBCU financial aid doesn’t kick in on time.
    D. Most Resources and Connections are Limited at HBCU. State schools usually have more resources that are funded by the state and it’s free. With most Private institutions you will have to pay for these resources.
    7. Going to school near home or away from home: In my opinion it works better in your favor if you go away from home because you become an independent. You learn how to live on your own
    8. With a 2.0 GPA can I still get scholarships? Yes! You can get scholarships for being the first one in your family to go to college, Living in low-income housing, being left-handed, the city you live in, minority, ect. When I was in H.S. an Asian kid was awarded several scholarships because he was Asian, had a twisted upper lip, and was left handed. You don’t have to fret if your GPA is closer to a 2.0 and you don’t play sports: It’s all about how you write your letters to convince them that YOU deserve the scholarship more than anyone else.
    9. When in Doubt: Not everyone graduates on time, and not everyone is certain of what they want to do after graduation, or if he/she is in the right major. To help you better decide be real with yourself. Find out what really interest you. If you like fashion or Reality TV maybe you should major in Communications, Marketing, Film, or Marketing. If you love to read magazines maybe you should major in Journalism. Don’t major in something that doesn’t interest you or just because the pay seems ok. Chances are you’re going to either Hate your job or
    10. INTERN-INTERNS: make sure that you get an internship before your senior year. This way you’ll get hands-on experience and can decipher whether or not this career move is the right one. Also, getting an internship is the best way to get your foot in the door. This usually determines whether or not you’re going to have a job after graduating. Keep in mind that the job market isn’t looking too hot right about now so do yourself a favor.
    11. FRATS/ SORORS: Don‚Äôt get me wrong, I‚Äôm all for the Brother/Sisterhood but make sure that you‚Äôre joining for all the right reasons. Do not join because you think that the organization is going to help you find great jobs after graduation: WRONG!!!! Most of my friends are in Greek Organizations and I haven‚Äôt heard 1 say how they received a job hookup from them. It‚Äôs basically there to help your college social years; nothing more nothing less — so don‚Äôt expect the world from them either.
    12. Last but not least; RECOMMENDATIONS – get in real good with a professor that teaches a course in your major. This way you can have a professor as a referral and what better resource to have then someone who knows this stuff. For instance, my cousin majored in Accounting and got in good with an accounting professor (at a community college). Not only did she refer him but she helped him land a job with well-respected Fortune 500 Accounting Company Straight after graduation from a 4yr university. Don’t ever underestimate your resources. He could’ve been working as a tax accountant with H&R Block but instead he’s traveling the world to audit major companies and making boucoupe $$ at that. Go figure

  • New Job Envy – Do You Have It?

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    Your closest co-worker just got a new job…and it makes you crazy because that could have been you. You’re as qualified as her; you have the same background and experience…why weren’t you the one who got a new job? Oh yeah, because you actually have to apply for a job in order to be offered it.
    How many times has this happened to you? You are technically job searching but you only casually look through job postings not having any intention to apply for any of them and you haven’t really gotten your resume and cover letter in the best shape possible. So what do you really expect to happen? It seems that many people are waiting for the Job Search Fairy to come and drop the perfect job in their lap. As you may have guessed, it doesn’t work that way. So, what can you do?
    Get Out of the ‘Wish Mode’
    Stop wishing for a new job and start actively looking for one. It’s a common situation: you look through job postings and picture yourself with that company, doing that job, earning more money. Sound familiar? Or someone close to you got offered their dream job and you’re still sitting on the sidelines wishing it was you who was moving onto bigger and brighter career endeavors?
    You need to take your job search into your own hands and be proactive. Don’t sit and wish each day away. Work doesn’t have to be such drudgery.
    You just have to…
    Buckle Down and Do It
    You’ve been putting off getting your resume and cover letter up to par and that can be a huge force that holds you back. If you’re not confident with your job search documents you send out, chances are you’re not going to get a whole lot of calls for interviews.
    If it’s a task that you don’t want to tackle yourself, don’t. There is no law that says you have to write your own resume and cover letter. In fact, a professional resume writing service can garner very positive job search results, in most cases. It is money well-spent if you choose the right company for you.
    It’s a win-win situation: you don’t have to stress about writing your resume package and you can be assured that the package you send out is above average…exceptional in many cases.
    Now, It’s Time to Get Excited
    You’ve got everything in place and you’re ready to start applying. So, instead of just daydreaming about the jobs you see listings for, apply for them. Today. Don’t wait until tomorrow or next week. Take the time to apply right now and you’ll see that you’ll get into a pattern of acting immediately. It’s a good habit to get into. You’ll get a lot more results that way. Why? Simply because you’ll end up submitting your resume package more often.
    Every time you submit your resume, just think: “This could be it. This could be my new job.” Isn’t that exciting? You never know what will come of your applications right away but the possibilities are endless. That alone should get your blood flowing and your heart pumping.
    Now get out there and take charge of your job search. There’s no time like the present.

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  • Learn Basic Office Skills

    November 29, 2006 by

    Jim Durbin is an employment blogger and former recruiter whose claim to expertise including once being a college student and graduate.
    I hired over 20 fresh college graduates from 1999-2001 as a recruiter in Los Angeles. Their skills and aptitude varied, as did the pedigree of the institutions they attended, but a few things stick in my head to this day as a cautionary tale.
    The following is only anecdotal, but the more distinguished the school attended, the less likely the graduate had mastered basic office skills.
    One young lad from Berkeley is probably the best story. We hired him because he was smart, ambitious, negotiated well, and well, he went to Berkeley. There was a strategic (and wrong-headed) assumption that we could improve the quality of the office personnel by increasing the number of people who graduated from private and top-ranked colleges.
    It was insulting to the number of highly successful state school graduates we had in the company, but it was a mistake many companies made (and still make). Anyway, our young graduate was a recuiter, and back in those days, we made paper copies of the resumes that people brought in.
    The copier we had was relatively new, but pretty straightforward. It had a top-loading section for automatic copies and you could lift the lid for manual copies. It also had the occasional problem of jamming….

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  • Where to Send Your Resume?

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    This is picking back up on my previous resume blogs. I took a look at my CollegeGrad.com newsletter today, which focused on where college students should send their resumes. I wish I had this newsletter before I graduated from college back at Tech (Florence-Darlington Technical College). Since I didn’t, I thought it was important to share it with all of you in college or either going back to college.
    According to my newsletter, the first place to send your resume is your school’s career center. This should be done as soon as possible at the beginning of the first semester in your final year. There are three reasons why. The first is that the majority of campus career centers establish a set of paper or electronic resumes to be sent out to potential employers. Reason number two is that your college will send your individual resume to employers who ask for those resumes of prospective graduates in a given major. The list of employers includes some who are pre-screening candidates for on-campus interviews. The last reason is that normally, you won’t be able to sign-up for on campus interviews without completing the second step.

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  • Everybody Loves a Free Lunch

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    If you’ve ever wandered around Whole Foods at lunch (why, oh why is the Nashville Whole Foods not yet built??) you know that the plethora of samples can equal a free lunch.

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  • High School Students Have Unrealistic Career Expectations

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    In my conversations with employers of Gen Y students, many complain that their high school and college aged employees have unrealistic expectations about the type of work that they are qualified to do and how hard they need to work in order to succeed. While I’ve often chalked that type of talk up to the perennial tendency of older generations to look with disdain upon younger generations, there is some empirical support for the concerns being expressed about Gen Y.

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  • The One Skill You’d Better Look For

    November 28, 2006 by

    When employers talk about desirable skills they look for in new hires, they usually mean things like writing, data analysis, interpersonal communication, and project management. But what about the ability to LEARN?

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  • Don’t Go There: Taboo Topics in Job Interviews

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    interview photoWhen interviewing for a new job, it is important that you walk the walk (look professional) but also that you talk the talk (ask the right questions and give the right answers). In order to do the latter, avoid topics such as sex, politics, and religion unless they are directly relevant to the position (they almost never are) as well as the following:

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  • Why IT Recruiting as a profession?

    November 27, 2006 by

    Sometimes people in our industry can get a bad repetition or make someone mad. But, is that because what the industry is or what they did?

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  • Your Daily Commute Means More Than You Think

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    “Location, location, location,” is not only a relevant phrase when shopping for a prime piece of real estate but it is also a key determinant when conducting a job search.

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