• International Internships

    September 30, 2006 by

    If you’re like me and you like to travel, then the possibility of doing an internship abroad might be right up your alley.
    Boston College has a link on their Web site that takes you to an informative site generated by the University of Michigan. There are a lot of things to consider when contemplating an internship over seas. Let’s take a look at some of them:
    The first thing the University of Michigan’s International Center recommends you ask yourself is Why? Why do you want to do an internship abroad? Do you just want to travel to a foreign land or do you really want to have a career-related experience?
    The next question you want to ask is Where? Where would you want to go? As a journalism major, I wouldn’t be averse to interning in any industrialized country. The Peace Corps has never held any fascination for me. I am shamefully spoiled and completely abhor the idea of living anywhere that lacks indoor plumbing.
    Why? and Where? are the two most important questions you need to ask yourself before filling out any applications or considering the costs involved. An internship that is career-oriented is important, whether it’s done domestically or in a foreign country. Think carefully about what you hope to gain from doing your internship somewhere other than the U.S.

  • Headhunter‚ĶHere‚Äôs My Recipe For My Dream Entry-Level Job‚ĶCan You Make It For Me?

    September 29, 2006 by


    You can have your very own job cheerleader, although it won’t be free, and its name is a headhunter. These people are job consultants and advise all sorts of job seekers with catching their “dream job.” For you entry-level job seekers out there, if you decide to hire a headhunter make sure to have them find you all the best opportunities out there.
    In addition, headhunters go door-to-door to find you that job opportunity. They go to different companies and sell you to the companies in question. A headhunter is an entry-level job seekers best friend! I’m not sure how much these job goldmines cost but if you are so inclined, do some more research on it. There are some articles written by headhunters and columns where you can “ask the headhunter,” so you may not have to pay anything at all and still get some good job searching advice.
    I did read an article that had a sort of “beware of the headhunter” feel and cautioned job seekers who want to utilize the talent of a headhunter. The article states that job seekers should be sure they have a legitimate headhunter hunting for them. As in anything you do, research it thoroughly before committing to it. I provide a link below that has tips and tricks to help you spot a good or bad headhunter so read up. Next, have fun, learn new things and get your headhunter to find you that entry-level job!!
    Recognizing Headhunters:
    http://www.esquiregroup.com/about_news_02.cfm
    Headhunter Resources:
    http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=headhunter&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

  • Diesel Tech Jobs For Entry-Level

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    Your first stop should be the Diesel Technician Society where you can find articles written by real life diesel techs, forums and even the “employment hub,” which has all your job search needs (like resume posting).
    Once you find those entry-level diesel tech opportunities and receive your formal training, you will be able to move into more skilled work in the future. There are automotive systems and diagnostic equipment that an entry-level diesel tech will learn to use effectively so that they can eventually specialize in a variety of disciplines. These disciplines include body repair work inspecting and maintaining vehicles as an automotive technician (and the list continues). There are also a variety of departments that someone with the job title diesel tech can operate in. There are not only jobs, such as the ones listed above that are labor intensive.
    There are a variety of web resources at your disposal for entry-level diesel tech jobs in all disciplines so look into them. While you’re at it, have fun, learn new things and find that entry-level job!!
    Diesel Technician Society:
    http://www.jobvertise.com/members/fddts
    Additional Resources:
    http://msn.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Jobs/JobDetails.aspx?IPath=JRGT&job_did=J8C6NY6P6DPF77GRP3Y&cbRecursionCnt=1&cbsid=fa9eb0b7aba944afa533627206b8dee2-212836676-VO-4
    http://www.careerexplorer.net/jobchoices/automotive.asp
    http://283.careersite.com/candidate/processcandviewjob?docid=LA14295172&source=search

  • Statistic college grads need to know!

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    You’ve re-written your resume more times then you’ve gone to keg parties (slight exaggeration). You searched the employment section of the newspaper for the last four Sundays. You’ve sent out three resumes snail mail and you’ve sent out 30 via e-mail. Then one day, just when you decided you really didn’t want a job anyway, the call comes. “We can interview you tomorrow at 11am.” says the professional voice on the other end.
    You agree. In the back of your mind you’re thinking, damn, that means I‚Äôll have to wake up by 9am tomorrow. So much for spending the evening on My Space. You make a few calls. The telling of friends and parents goes like this, ‚Äú Yea; just like that, I got an interview.‚Äù After you hang up; the panic sets in. How do I sell myself? Why would anyone hire me?
    I’ve come across a great statistic that will give you more confidence on any entry-level job interview. Only 30.1% of men in the United States and only 28.8% of women in the United States have four or more years of a college education. (Blau,Ferber and Winkler, pg161) So you see, you are better educated than 70% of the total population. Now think about this, if you were interviewing employees for an entry-level job would you rather hire someone who has proven they can achieve more education than 70% of the total population? Of course you would.
    Even if, the classified ad stated in bold “College Degree Required“, you can bet that over half the resumes that were received over looked the college degree required information. Throw your shoulder back and stand proud. You are already ahead of 70% of the population. Use this information to your advantage. Go on the interview. Your odds of getting the job have increased by having the diploma. Yes, that diploma really does mean something! You’ve worked hard for this interview now go for your dream-a pay check..
    Blau, Ferber,Winkler. The Economics of Women, Men and Work. Pearson Education, 2006. UpperSaddle River, Nw Jersey

  • Entry level job statistic every college grad needs to know.

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    You’ve re-written your resume more times then you’ve gone to keg parties (slight exaggeration). You searched the employment section of the newspaper for the last four Sundays. You’ve sent out three resumes snail mail and you’ve sent out 30 via e-mail. Then one day, just when you decided you really didn’t want a job anyway, the call comes. “We can interview you tomorrow at 11am.” says the professional voice on the other end.
    You agree. In the back of your mind you’re thinking, damn, that means I‚Äôll have to wake up by 9am tomorrow. So much for spending the evening on My Space. You make a few calls. The telling of friends and parents goes like this, ‚Äú Yea; just like that, I got an interview.‚Äù After you hang up; the panic sets in. How do I sell myself? Why would anyone hire me?
    I’ve come across a great statistic that will give you more confidence on any entry-level job interview. Only 30.1% of men in the United States and only 28.8% of women in the United States have four or more years of a college education. (Blau,Ferber and Winkler, pg161) So you see, you are better educated than 70% of the total population. Now think about this, if you were interviewing employees for an entry-level job would you rather hire someone who has proven they can achieve more education than 70% of the total population? Of course you would.
    Even if, the classified ad stated in bold “College Degree Required“, you can bet that over half the resumes that were received over looked the college degree required information. Throw your shoulder back and stand proud. You are already ahead of 70% of the population. Use this information to your advantage. Go on the interview. Your odds of getting the job have increased by having the diploma. Yes, that diploma really does mean something! You’ve worked hard for this interview now go for your dream-a pay check..
    Blau, Ferber,Winkler. The Economics of Women, Men and Work. Pearson Education, 2006. UpperSaddle River, Nw Jersey

  • Management Training Course Video

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    A tip of the hat to Jason Davis of Recruiting.com for spotting this Monty Python classic management training course interview video. For anyone who has ever been subjected to ridiculous psychological interview techniques, this is a must see.

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  • The Opportunity For Consulting At The Entry-Level Is High

    September 28, 2006 by

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  • Simply Marvelous: Entry-Level Fashion Jobs

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  • Accounting Cover Letters Beyond The Ordinary

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    The salary levels and the demand for accounting jobs are both going through the roof. All companies need accounting personnel, whether they are pharmaceutical manufacturers, automotive companies, hotels or colleges; this is the reason for this job’s evergreen outlook. Given this background, writing the “Get Noticed” cover letter for accounting has been the biggest challenge for candidates.
    Accounting Cover Letter Intricacies
    The cover letter can be made noticeable by including the three fundamental qualities demanded of an accountant. The first one being the knowledge of the field of accounting; your proficiency in handling different accounting software and your educational background. Your reason for interest in that particular company and a willingness to take on the workload will demonstrate your keenness for the job. You should use action words/phrases such as “Reduced non performing assets by 25% within a quarter”, which will project you as a results-oriented person. Another important aspect of writing a good accounting cover letter is that you should match your qualifications to the job for which you are applying. HR managers will always appreciate those who research the company beforehand and before taking action. From your point of view, research may also reveal a few points that you may not like about the company, so you may also end up saving yourself some time.
    Don’t Be Boring
    Include in your cover letter any extra training or certificates you have had in the past, your job responsibilities and achievements. Many candidates who search for an accounting job forget that they are seeking a position which bestows upon them great responsibility – and their cover letter becomes boring and routine as a result, which fails miserably.
    Don’t Forget Formatting
    The above points must be made in the second paragraph of your cover letter. The first paragraph should be reserved for opening the letter; self-introduction, job-code references – if applicable, and greeting. Thank the addressee in last paragraph and end on a positive note. Proofread the letter a couple of times for logic, flow, and spelling and grammar errors. Give your contact information in full at the top of the letter, matching the header of your resume.
    On first glance, the field of accounting may seem to be boring and routine. If you look more deeply, you will find that it is an area of great responsibility and good potential for growth. Recruiters are accustomed to seeing boring, drab accounting cover letters. By following the steps above, you can give them something that they aren’t expecting and enhance your chances for an interview.

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  • Career Fair Mistakes

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    I’ve caught several articles in the past few weeks about career fairs and how to make the most of them. I particularly liked a piece by Tracey Minor who suggests using job fairs as practice interviews among other things. Throughout my career in the staffing and recruiting industry, I’ve been involved in many, many job fairs representing Spherion and seeking prospective employees. Although there are many new, innovative venues to use for job searching (such as this blog), career fairs still offer candidates a number of benefits, not the least of which is landing a job. I won’t list the benefits here, there are a number of articles you can check out that cover them very well including "Guerrilla Tactics for Job Fairs," and Ian Ybarra’s post with three important tips.

    I do have a collection of “what not to do’s” that I can share with you. They are:

    1) Never attend without a resume
    2) Please don’t hand out a resume with errors/misspellings
    3) If you’re not dressed for the part, don’t go. Remember, this is an interview
    4) Approaching employers/booths when it is overcrowded – you’ll never stand out – wait until they are less busy
    5) Don’t drop off and run – avoid the urge to simply hand out as many resumes as you can – that isn’t the goal. Make sure you take the time to talk to the employers, ask questions and appear genuinely interested and not just another company on the receiving end of your resume rampage.
    — Tim Gorman is a group vice president for Spherion, a leading provider of recruiting and staffing services. He oversees the operations of 28 staffing offices in Central Florida.