ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 30, 2006 by

Internships vs Co-op Programs

An internship can be defined as “a period of apprenticeship when students work off-campus, under supervision, in a school, factory, hospital, business, laboratory, or government agency or program. It also allows students to learn practical applications of classroom material.” (CollegeInColorado.org) A co-op program, which most people would regard as being different, can be defined as a “college sponsored work/internship program.” (College Counseling Guidebook) So what’s the difference?
Even though you can’t readily tell from those definitions, internships are generally short-term relationships. They often last just weeks or perhaps a few months. Co-op relationships often last for years and are typically long-term relationships during which the student attends classes, takes a break for weeks or months to get practical training, goes back to classes for weeks or months, back to practical training, etc.
In the May 2006 issue of Campus Career Counselor, Co-Editor Peter Vogt asks why aren’t all schools co-op schools by requiring their students to participate in several full-fledged co-op experiences in order to graduate. He adds that he can’t find any downside to co-op programs other than they sometimes extend the period of time during which the student is enrolled in school, but that downside is easily offset by the phenomenal and vital practical experience that participating students accumulate by the time they graduate, contacts, and more. Employers love co-op programs because they lead to great hires (60 percent of co-op students accept jobs with their co-op employers). The same questions could be asked about why schools don’t require students to have fulfilled several full-fledged internships in order to graduate. Co-op or internship, I can see more and more schools requiring students to obtain such experience before they graduate. But would it be a good thing for schools to require that?

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Posted June 30, 2006 by

Resume May Lead To Higher Salary

How does everyone feel about their current resume? Have you ever thought that your current salary may depend on the quality of your resume? Many people, like myself, may not realize that prospective employers start negotiating your salary once they review your resume, not once they make you a job offer. Employers believe resumes make their first impression of you and decide how soon they should contact you before someone else. A prospective employee may have all the skills in the world, but sell them short on a resume. I certainly don’t want to miss out on the big money for this reason. I recently updated my resume and will keep everyone posted on any new developments.

Posted June 30, 2006 by

Internships: Paid or Unpaid?

When you’re in college your professors always tell you take an internship, whether it’s paid or unpaid. But how many students really want to take an unpaid internship? Some people say that there are really good benefits to taking an unpaid internship versus a paid internship. I have had both and the benefits were similar but yet different. During one of my unpaid internships at a local television station I learned a lot about how the entire station works and how each department interacts with the other. Since the internship was unpaid I was able to work more hours and really get some hands on experience in the field of communications. The next semester I ended up with a paid internship at another television station, in which I learned even more about the industry. On occasion, there would be stories and events that would take place after my scheduled work time and I was unable to attend because I was considered a paid employee and every hour I worked was recorded. If I went over my allotted hours before the semester ended, I would have to explain why my internship didn’t last as long as it was supposed to. But those were just two of my experiences. There are some companies that will offer unpaid internships to students who can receive college credit for their internship. While other companies do not give students college credit but will in return issue them a stipend. Every once in a while you will come across a company/organization will give you college credit and a stipend for being their intern. Do you see any differences in taking a paid internship versus an unpaid internship? Does the amount of money help you determine whether or not you will take an internship?

Posted June 29, 2006 by

Holding on Too Tight — The Best Way to Kill a Relationship

One of the things I do is provide career development advice and coaching to job seekers and those who are employed. One of the other things I do is provide evaluation and then advice on various internal business issues that need a solution or a better way of getting the work done. Yet another thing that I do is network. Actually, it’s simply chatting with people about this, about that, and just getting to know them.
So it was that I had an interesting opportunity to do some organizational development as well as career coaching.

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Posted June 29, 2006 by

It’s Time to Turn the Tables

So many times, I’ve reviewed the Interns’ posts and heard just about the same thing at any time. The post is about how they’ve been contacted by a recruiter for a job opening. The trouble is, the job doesn’t seem to be open any more. In the alternative, they go on the interview and the job seems to have vanished. Interesting, that.

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Posted June 29, 2006 by

Graphic Designer Resume

TITLE
graphic artist/designer -> 5 yrs exp
OBJECTIVE
Position as graphic artist/designer working with multimedia
projects. Five years of experience. Diverse software skills,
including HTML.
KEYWORDS
graphics, design, graphic artist, graphic arts, graphic design, graphic designer, multimedia designer, multimedia artist, visual communications, designing, publishing,
HIGHLIGHTS
* Special expertise includes pen and ink, watercolor,
prismacolor pencil and graphic design software; able to learn
and teach new software skills.
* With other artists, won Cox Award for Turner Field Graphic
(1997).
* Software skills include PhotoShop 4.0, Freehand 7.0,
Illustrator 6.0, QuarkXPress, Adobe Acrobat 3.0, Dimensions,
Fetch 1.2, PageMill 2.0, and Streamline 3.0; BBEdit 4.5,
Deltagraph Pro 3, GIFbuilder, Satellite 3D and Typestyler.
* Experienced meeting quotas and deadlines consistently.
* Assistant Managing Editor for News Art and Photography
noted my skills, citing my knowledge of computers and
technology.
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Graphic Artist/Designer: The XYZ Journal-Constitution,
Any City, Any State (1993-present).
Create informational graphics, charts, sigs/logos and illustrations
for various departments.
* Work closely with editors, reporters and managers in fast-
paced, deadline-driven atmosphere. Position demands effective
verbal, written and electronic communication throughout
complex organization.
* Provided coaching and on-the-job training for more than 10 co-
workers on multimedia and graphic software.
* Immediately hired as full-time employee after 10-week
internship (beating out more than 12 applicants nationwide).
* News Arts Graphics Editor noted my dedication and reliability
on the job.
Paste-up Artist: XYZ Corp, Any City,Any State (1993).
Handled paste-ups and four-color separations. Worked closely with
other department members in preparing color advertisements for
print in local telephone directories.
* Required working with advertising managers in high-output
environment.
EDUCATION
AA: Visual Communications, Art Institute of XYZ, Any City, Any State (1992).
OTHER FACTS
* Budgeted resources to financially assist brother attending
university (five years).
* Volunteer to illustrate church bulletin (two years).
* Enjoy finding more efficient ways to do the job, without
sacrificing quality.

Posted June 29, 2006 by

Cheesy Analogy or Profound Words of Wisdom?

Indulge me for a few minutes. Some of my colleagues often compare the process of choosing a career/job with that of buying a car. While it might be a little cheesy, it can be actually quite accurate.
When you buy a car, one of the first things most people do is read about different cars. You can find tons of information online, in magazines, or in the newspaper. What kind of mileage does it get? What are some of the features included? How many doors? And so on. Then, you learn more about it by asking other people. You might talk to your friend who has the same car; what do they like about it? You might ask your mechanic about how reliable it is. You might even ask the car salesman questions about options, financing, and some final technical questions. But the last step is usually test-driving it. You want to actually take it out on the road, see how it handles, and get a feel for how comfortable it is. So as a whole, you read about the car, talk to others about the car, and finally test-drive the car.
The same goes with exploring different careers. One of the first things you should do when deciding on different career options is to read about various occupations. What are the work tasks like? What are the hours like? What is the job outlook? Who does this type of work? There are many great resources for finding out this information. The Occupational Outlook Handbook is a great starting point, as are professional associations and libraries. And of course, there are tons of websites detailing different careers.
Once you’ve read a bit about different careers to narrow down what seems like a good fit, it’s often great to talk to people about the job and career field. That’s where networking and informational interviewing come in. Actually ask people who are doing what you want to do about their experience. What do they like and dislike about the position? What are the common entry-points, and what are the options for advancement? Let’s get first-hand expert advice.
But even after reading about options and talking to people, you still aren’t going to know for sure what careers would be the best fit. The last step is to actually try them out. Take an internship, volunteer, or work part-time in the field. These are all great ways to “try out” the career field and experience it. And even your first, second, and maybe third full-time positions will be a sort of trial experience for you. Often you won’t know for sure if it’s a good fit until you’re doing it day in, day out, with the same people.
Cheesy analogy? Maybe. But if you approach a career decision in a similar manner, you will hopefully lessen the probability of getting “stuck” in a career you absolutely hate. You will have already done enough research to avoid a job you hate.

Posted June 29, 2006 by

Video Job Descriptions

We’ve been working on this for months so I’m pretty excited to announce that we’re starting to roll out a brand new feature for CollegeRecruiter.com: video job descriptions. Job seekers who want a sneak peak at what it is like to work in a particular job have always been able to job shadow, but it can be difficult to find employers who are willing to allow outsiders to follow an employee around for a day or even part of a day. Now, in just a few minutes, job seekers can get a taste (well, actually see and hear) what it is like to work in a particular field.
We’ll soon have hundreds of these videos available to visitors to CollegeRecruiter.com and any other site. That’s right, we’re putting these in the public domain so college career service offices and any other web site will be able to run these videos on their sites at no charge. The first video is about Advertising and Promotions Managers:

Posted June 29, 2006 by

25 Best Corporate Employment Sites

It is often said that you don’t get a second chance to make a good first impression. That is especially true with respect to trying to recruit high quality candidates. These candidates almost always visit the employment web sites of the organization for which they are interested in working. CollegeRecruiter.com recently published a white paper on the best practices for corporate employment web sites, but even more recently Gerry Crispen of CareerXroads released their 2006 list of the 25 best corporate employment sites. Listed alphabetically, they are:

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Posted June 28, 2006 by

Research & Development Resume

SUMMARY
Highly accomplished R&D Director with extensive
Fortune 500 technical and business development
experience. Skilled in identifying winning and
losing projects in early phases of development.
KEYWORDS
XYZ director, manager, technical director,
research, technology, engineering, technical
service, business development, manufacturing,
product development, process development,
market analysis, business analysis, strategic
planning, sales, marketing, negotiating,
chemicals, petrochemicals, PhD, chemistry, BA.
PROFILE
Extensive R&D/engineering management background
includes broad technical knowledge/judgment,
ability to drive bottom-line performance in
developing products/processes and
manufacturing.
Strong business development expertise includes
business acumen that brings focus to strategic
areas, market/business analysis, strategic
planning, sales and negotiating.
Created $150 million+ in new revenue while
saving more than $100 million; promoted nine
times and received numerous awards/patents
during career with XYZ Corp. (1979-2000).
Exceptional leadership skills. Experienced
building world-class teams of 120+
professionals, establishing vision, setting
goals, communicating, motivating, empowering
and developing people.
Manager said: “As a leader, he is the best.
He has a vision of the future and a clear
strategy to get there. He inspires his people
to achieve that vision. He uses all of his
skills in managing the business and gets
results.”
EXPERIENCE
Senior Technical Advisor, XYZ Corp., Any City, Any State 2003-present
Provide technical sales and sales force support
for $70-million specialty chemicals business.
Created $3 million in new annual revenue by
turning around failing friction modifier
project.
Increased revenues $7 million annually by
developing new opportunity in fuel additives.
Developed strong relationships with top
technical people at key clients.
President, XYZ Laser Marking,
Any City, Any State 2001-2002
Completed working sabbatical while creating
Internet business based on unique products.
Produced proof of concept by generating $50,000
in first full year with effective marketing
efforts.
Research Director – XYZ Assets, XYZ
Technology Company, Any City, Any State 1998-2000
Hand-picked to direct, engineering and
technical service for $3-billion petrochemicals
business, including technical support of 75
plants worldwide.
Brought focus to department and created high-
performance manufacturing support teams.
Saved $39 million in annual manufacturing costs
by introducing several new petrochemical
processes, process models and advanced control
systems.
Technology Director, XYZ Chemical Company,
Any CIty, Any State 1993-1997
Directed R&D, technical service and product
stewardship for $600-million specialty
chemicals business.
Grew income from $34 million to $100 million
and directed development of 50+ new products.
Led multi-functional business team responsible
for $200-million poly alpha-olefin business.
Grew sales 15% annually by driving industry
acceptance of PAO derived from mixed olefins
and despite strong competition from new market
entrants and major raw material supply
disruptions.
Manager, Strategic Planning & Financial
Analysis, XYZ Chemical Company, Any City, ANy State 1992
Led strategic and financial planning group.
Analyzed markets/economics associated with new
businesses.
Saved $40-million investment by analyzing
market, showing that previous analyses were
flawed and convincing Executive Committee to
stop construction of plant to make new chemical
intermediates.
Led development of flagship product line after
recognizing potential for abandoned technology
and convincing leadership team to produce new
family of synthetic base stocks.
Promoted to Technology Director as result of
ability to identify potential winning and
losing projects.
Manager-Business Development, XYZ Research &
Engineering, Any CIty, Any State 1986-1991
Appointed to newly created position to develop
Mobil’s licensing business. Created business
model for licensing technology. Developed
business and marketing plans.
Grew licensing and catalyst sales income from
$40 million to $110 million annually.
Identified 10+ major opportunities, negotiated
licensing deals and initiated joint ventures to
complement internal skills and technology.
Manufacturing Manager, XYZ Solar Energy
Corporation, Any CIty, Any State 1983-1985
Established solar cell manufacturing line and
consolidated gains made in research.
As Manager, XYZ Growth Operations, turned
around group that was cornerstone of business.
Developed teamwork/established goals to
challenge operators of photovoltaic production
facility (1984).
Increased productivity two-fold in one year.
Eliminated costly purification and raw
materials inspection, shifting responsibility
to suppliers.
As Head of XYZ Planning, developed
business/marketing plans and presented them to
Executive Committee. Convinced leadership team
to change strategic direction (1983).
Group Leader, XYZ Synthesis, XYZ
Research Lab, Any CIty, Any State 1979-1982
Led catalyst research program to develop
innovative new catalysts and manufacturing
processes.
Catapulted company to lead position in critical
new area by negotiating research agreement with
University of Illinois. Won $75-million patent
infringement suit in part based on this work.
Awarded 13 US and foreign patents.
Promoted from Research Chemist position within
first year (1980).
EDUCATION
PhD, Chemistry, University of XYZ,
Any CIty, ANy STate 1979
Discovered often-cited family of metal cluster
compounds in dynamic equilibrium that provided
unique model of hydrocarbon transformations on
metal surfaces. Authored six publications.
BA, Chemistry, cum laude, The College of
XYZ, Any City, ANy State 1975
Received departmental honors
Prize, XYZ Award, American Institute of
Chemists Award and XYZ Xi International
Scientific and Engineering Honor Society.