• Leveraging diversity: CEO Faith Rothberg presents 8 organizations who are succeeding [video and slides]

    June 21, 2017 by

     

    There are more men named John and David who run big companies than all the women who run big companies.

    College Recruiter CEO Faith Rothberg has a problem with this, and made a point of offering solutions at this year’s National Association of Colleges and Employers conference. In the video below, Rothberg highlights eight organizations who are leveraging diversity to impact their customer numbers, workplace culture and profitability.

    Watch Rothberg’s presentation, and find links to her examples below, along with major takeaways.

    Study after study prove the business case for gender diversity. Increased gender diversity positively impacts productivity, innovation, decision-making, and employee retention and satisfaction. In fact, companies with the highest rates of gender diversity make more than 13 times average sales revenue than companies with the lowest gender diversity. Similarly, those gender diverse companies pull in an average of 15,000 more customers.

    The amount of gender diversity varies by industry and role. Medical and health services managers, for example, are actually more likely to be women than men, as are human resources or social service managers. But only 36% of management occupations are filled with 50% women. That includes marketing and sales, operations, transportation, information systems and much more.

    Here are eight companies leading the way to increase gender diversity

    1. Aramark became a Catalyst partner of Women’s Foodservice Forum.
    2. Bank of America has invested in LEAD for Women, an employee resource group dedicated to women’s professional development. About half of managers and executive management team are women.
    3. Enterprise Rent-A-Car named Pamela Nicholson as CEO in 2013. She joined the company 32 years ago as a recent grad.
    4. Ernst & Young opens up dialogue between men and women via Inclusiveness Steering Committees, encouraging candid discussions about critical issues and experiences, and establishing mentoring and sponsorship initiatives. They’ve increased the number of women in top management by 20%.
    5. (Two orgs here): Goldman Sachs and U.S. Department of State partner to leverage the expertise of the public and private sectors to encourage inclusive economic growth in the Middle East and Northern Africa.
    6. IBM developed task forces that focus on understanding differences and finding ways to appeal to more employees and customers. Revenues from small and midsize businesses dominated by minority and female buyers increased from $10 million to $300 million.
    7. Quicken Loans routinely ranks among the best U.S. companies for both diversity and overall company culture. Women fill 45% of all jobs and 43% of management jobs.

    Takeaways from Rothberg:

    1. Diversity and inclusion goes beyond race. It includes ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, generation, disability, personality type, thinking style, and gender.
    2. Leverage that diversity to produce better products and services.
    3. Use variety of practices including mentoring, employee resource groups, multicultural talent management, strategic partnership development, and e-learning.
    4. Senior leaders must seek diversity, create inclusion, and drive accountability.
    5. Promote cognitive diversity. Embrace differing perspectives, interpretations. Overcome unconscious bias and culture that inhibits the sharing of different opinions.

    Download Rothberg’s PowerPoint slides here.

     

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.

  • Employers: Don’t let these 5 job search scams ruin your reputation

    June 20, 2017 by

     

    Employers beware: Job seekers aren’t the only targets of hackers, scammers, and thieves. Thieves are also conducting sophisticated job search scams targeting HR professionals, recruiters, and hiring managers. The goal of these malicious attacks is to steal identity, personal information, financial information, data, and to disrupt business.

    “Job hunters aren’t the only ones who are vulnerable to recruitment scams,” says cybersecurity journalist Maria Korolov, of TheBestVPN.com. “Companies looking for new staff could also lose money, or suffer  reputational damage, if they’re not careful.”

    As with real estate, location matters in recruitment advertising and marketing. When considering where to place a job ad or who to partner with in recruitment advertising, make sure that the job board you choose puts your company in the best light, says Korolov.

    “You want your help wanted ad listed alongside those of well-known, reputable companies, not next to scam, work-from-home offers,” says Korolov.  “Craigslist, for example, while it is one of the least expensive options, is also flooded with iffy job postings. Some sites, like College Recruiter, manually vet companies who post ads on their platforms to ensure that scammers can’t get in.”

    College Recruiter recently published The job seeker’s guide to identifying and avoiding job search scams, which highlighted the fact that the team at College Recruiter takes the threat of job search scams, recruitment advertising scams, and fake job postings seriously, and has implemented a multi-step process that identifies and blocks the vast majority of identity thieves and other scammers from ever posting a job to College Recruiter. In fact, every single job advertisement placed on College Recruiter goes through an in-depth verification process to prove the job posting is legitimate, and all ads are verified through actual contact with a human with the employer posting the job ad – something not every job board can claim.

    “Here at College Recruiter, we take these fraudulent attempts very seriously and work daily to ensure all the jobs that are posted on our web site are from verified employers to protect our job seekers from applying, interviewing, and becoming victims of identity theft,” says Dani Bennett, Sales and Client Services Manager at College Recruiter.

    To combat rising efforts of employers being the target of job search scams, College Recruiter’s CEO Faith Rothberg moderated a panel discussion on this topic at the 2016 TATech Industry Congress event in Orlando. In the panel discussion, and in this video, Rothberg and members of TATech, the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions, discussed solutions for employers looking for ways to confront recruitment advertising and job search scams head on.

    There are five kinds of scams HR professionals should be aware of:

    1. Job search scams targeting employers’ campus recruiting efforts

    Alisha Barton, University Relations Program Manager for Kerry, a leader in the food, beverage, and pharma industries, with 23,000 staff and 100+ innovation and manufacturing centers across six continents, has a sister who is a junior in college who received a phishing email from someone claiming to be a recruiter from Google.

    “A common phishing scam on campuses that affects both an employer and job seekers is one where the scammer uses an email address that is similar to a company’s real email domain,” says Barton. “When scammers contact students, they often email with a list of positions and indicate that the candidate is a fit, or even hired, for these openings. They might even include real job descriptions. The email directs the student to a third party website, where they’re asked to enter in their personal information to obtain employment. The phishers use this information to steal the job seekers identity.”

    In a recruiting scam like this, the college student would be the one most greatly affected, but this also affects the brand and reputation of the employer, because college students will surely talk about a potential scam that happened when applying to certain companies, which could scare off other college students or recent college grads, from applying from open jobs. It could lead to that recent college grad going to social media to share the phishing/scam story, and that could then alert future candidates who may be hesitant to apply for a job with that company.

    Barton said the HR team at Kerry works closely with campus career centers to ensure job seekers are aware of Kerry’s hiring process, to prevent these type of phishing scams to affect both job seekers and employers. It’s important for other employers to do the same.

    “An employer’s reputation is on the line, and developing campus relationships are key to avoiding and preventing these types of scams,” says Barton.

    It’s important for companies to be aware of these situations to protect their brand image, says Tony Sorensen, who has over 20 years of experience providing strategic advicee on recruiting strategy, and is CEO and Founder of Versique Search and Consulting. “Companies thrive off of credibility and trust. If companies are not aware of these scams, something like this can severely damage a company’s integrity.”

    2. Job search scams where thieves steal company logo and creating fake career sites

    Some scammers go as far as stealing a company logo, and creating a job site similar to an employers online career site. HR professionals and recruiters need to watch for these types of scams. It happens to the biggest companies too, not just small employers. In July, Shell Oil, one of America’s largest oil and natural gas producers with over 22,000 employees, posted a notice on its careers site warning job seekers that scammers were using the Shell name and logo to recruit for positions. These scammers can create some serious mistrust and reputation damage.

    3. Ransomware targets HR departments, posing as job applicants

    Another scam: GoldenEye ransomware targets HR departments, seeking new/inexperienced HR professionals or recruiters, or those not trained on the latest cybersecurity threats, phishing, or other job search scams. Employees end up opening emails and attachments from unknown sources, without much thought. These hackers pose as job applicants, complete with cover letters and resumes, and can infect target computers or companies with malicious software via Excel files supposedly containing an application form. Once the spreadsheet is opened by the victim, and macros enabled to run as prompted, GoldenEye executes a code that encrypts the user’s files and presents them with a ransom note. This happened at the Berlin headquarters of one large recruiting and staffing firm, and hackers demanded a ransom of approximately $1,000, or 1.4 bitcoins, in order to retrieve the now encrypted files.

    When this happened, all HR personnel – and other staff – were advised not to open emails with Excel files attached or to enable macros, unless the sender was known and confirmed. The situation prompted a company-wide re-evaluation of security holes, especially in the HR department, in order to prevent the loss of critical files, downtime, and disruption that can be caused by an aggressive ransomware attack.

    4. Fake resumes/fraudulent video conference calls

    Fake candidates also are likely to submit over-exaggerated resumes, with too many skill sets that seems too good to be true, or a resume with fake education or certifications. Some will even make up colleges or universities. Other scammers may advance to an phone interview stage, but persist on a video conference interview where they can send harmful click bait through a video conference line, says Sorensen.

    That’s why it’s especially important for HR leaders and recruiters to educate all employees about potential phishing scams, especially those in HR who may receive hundreds of emails a day or week.

    Sorensen says employers and HR professionals can ensure they are not victims of recruitment advertising scams or job search scams by understanding that if an email attachment, or job inquiry seems suspicious, do some extra digging or research. “When in doubt, Google the company, position or candidate, and check social media profiles,” says Sorensen.

    5. Tax scams targeting HR professionals

    One common phishing scam targets HR and payroll staff during tax season. That’s why now is the time to start educating employees – not in a hurry before tax season. According to the SHRM article HR Beware: ’Tis the Season for W-2 Scams as tax deadline nears, HR should be aware that cyber thieves typically target new HR workers. According to SHRM, “between January and March of 2015, more than 55 businesses had reportedly been tricked into emailing criminals sensitive payroll data, according to the security blog Cloudmark. HR professionals—some of whom were fired for exposing private information—were duped when they received spoofed or fake e-mail messages, like the one above, from thieves posing as senior company officials. Crooks obtain W-2s with Social Security numbers, salary data, birthdates, addresses and other personally identifiable information. They then file fake federal tax returns and claim refunds from the government. Employees may not realize they’ve been victimized until after they file their taxes.”

    The bottom line is all employees, especially HR and recruiters who are dealing with sensitive, private data, and who use technology tools frequently to do their job, need to be educated and trained on Cyber threats and scams, says Robert Siciliano, an expert in identify theft and CEO of the security firm IDTheftSecurity.com.

    “We should teach workers how to handle data to minimize the potential of its falling into the wrong hands,” said Siciliano. Siciliano also said that every employee—new and old—should get thorough training, and that each worker’s access to sensitive company data should be limited in accordance with his or her role in the organization. “And new employees, before they officially begin work, should complete this training before accessing the company’s network.”

    “It’s important that not only the company, but the employees as well, are actively aware of scams and taking precautions so they aren’t exposing themselves or the company to cyber threats that could harm its reputation,” says Sorensen.

    Says Korolov: “A bad experience that leaves an applicant with a bad taste in their mouth – or, worse yet, costs them money – will damage your company’s reputation.”

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.

     

  • Pre-hire assessments: pros and cons

    June 19, 2017 by

     

    Pre-hire assessments are becoming increasingly more common in the recruiting world — but that might not necessarily be a great idea for the HR space.

    The rise of pre-hire assessments

    Traditional hiring processes involved an HR-led screen of candidates, followed by phone screens, then in-person interviews, perhaps full-team meetings, and ultimately candidate selection.

    As recruiting increasingly became digital, though, there was a bit of a supply-demand problem here. For example, in 2012 7 million people applied for 260,000 British call center jobs. Companies in multiple industries began seeing a need for lower-cost, less-time-consuming hiring processes that yielded quality results. (Additionally, some statistics indicate 50% or more of candidates — it varies by country — embellish their resumes and reflect skills they don’t have.)

    Several hiring trends came from the low-cost/less-time-spent focus, and one of them was clearly pre-hire assessments.

    What are pre-hire assessments?

    Typically based on hiring/retention case studies and analyses of employee data, pre-hire assessments are tests (often short, web-based, and psychometric) designed to predict employee effectiveness (and ideally longevity) in a role.

    In recent years, large companies like Macy’s, PetSmart, Bloomingdale’s, Walmart, Burger King, Neiman Marcus, and Luxottica Retail Group, have begun using pre-hire assessments on top-of-funnel (early stage) job candidates.

    What are some examples of these tests?

    If you want to become a customer service rep at T-Mobile, for example, one test involves dealing with fictional customer James Easton. He’s cranky, he’s been on hold one hour, and he is livid about his bill going up. The job candidate must walk through a conversation with “James” — and ultimately decide whether he qualifies for a rebate.

    Marriott shows housekeeping applicants a photo of different landscaped areas, and they need to identify what’s wrong.

    The Dependability and Safety Instrument test is 18 questions long, conducted online, and used by a variety of (primarily British) companies to assess candidates for more blue-collar work; it’s designed to see if their rates of absenteeism or accidents might be high.

    Do these tests work?

    There is a mixed bag of research here.

    Consider the T-Mobile example above. Last year, they had 1 million applicants for 14,000 eventual hires. While they are careful to say that a variety of factors go into hiring, Jared Flynn (their head of HR) admits that most managers “go to the top of the barrel,” i.e. look for the best scores on the pre-hire assessments. Continue Reading

  • How entry-level assistant jobs can lead to long-term career success

    June 15, 2017 by

     

    Recent college grads seeking the opportunity to develop a wide variety of job related skills can do so by pursuing entry-level assistant jobs.

    That’s what Amanda Ponzar did in her first job as an administrative assistant.

    “It taught me business skills, computer skills, organization, project management, and how to work with others,” said Ponzar, who is now the Chief Marketing Officer of Community Health Charities, an Alexandria, VA-based non-profit federation that raises awareness and funds through workplace campaigns and strategic partnerships.

    From that job, Ponzar moved to a marketing assistant role with the Franklin Mint, a worldwide provider of fine art and collectibles.

    “I learned about marketing and advertising, and demonstrated curiosity, competence, dependability, and initiative, so I was soon asked to edit management letters and collateral marketing materials, and then was recommended by my colleagues for a copywriter job at The Franklin Mint’s in-house ad agency,” said Ponzar.

    That is when Ponzar’s career took off. She moved into advertising copywriter and marketing management roles, went back to school to earn a Master’s Degree in advertising and marketing, and is now a CMO of a non-profit.

    She credits her varied experiences as an assistant for her career growth and success.

    “I wouldn’t be where I am today without those first entry-level jobs as an assistant that helped me define my career path,” said Ponzar.

    College students, and recent college grads should consider assistant jobs as a way to get their foot in a door at a company they would like to work with, or to build important job skills. While most college grads don’t get a degree aspiring to be an assistant, think long-term. Assistant jobs help provide a paycheck to start paying off school loans or debt (and help achieve financial independence to not live at home), and/or provide real world experience and a chance to build important job skills. In addition, it’s a great opportunity for the recent college grad considering grad school to gain work experience before taking the next step of their career. Many assistants could also work with companies as they pursue advanced educational opportunities – and maybe the employer will also help pay for it through tuition reimbursement programs. Building a variety of marketable skills is important, and assistant jobs provide a great opportunity to do just that.

    Assistants have unique opportunities to be exposed to all facets of a business, says Brandi Britton, District President of OfficeTeam, a leader in the placement of highly skilled office and administrative professionals into administrative assistant and front office jobs. Assistant jobs are in demand at small and large companies, non-profits, startups, Fortune 500 and Silicon Valley firms. Companies like Google, Facebook, and other leading tech firms all succeed because of good assistants.

    “Entry-level assistant can learn valuable technology skills from constant exposure to Microsoft Office, enterprise resource planning, database management and customer relationship management software,” says Britton. “You may even build experience with social media tools since administrative staff are often tasked with monitoring and managing their company’s accounts.”

    Recent college grads seeking assistant jobs, whether it be an administrative assistant, marketing assistant, office assistant, personal assistant or executive assistant (which often do take more advanced skills), can also learn these important career skills, says Britton:

    • Time and project management: Assistants often have to keep on top of executives’ schedules as well as project timelines. Let’s not forget that assignments come their way from every direction. That’s why assistants are masters of time and project management, organization, multitasking and adaptability.
    • Continual learning opportunities: You become well-rounded because you’re able to work on a variety of tasks – everything from event coordination to presentation decks. Once you figure out the types of projects you like most, you can hone your skills and consider moving on to a more specialized role in the organization.
    • Budget and negotiation: When you frequently speak with vendors and make purchases on behalf of the company, you quickly become skilled at budgeting and negotiation.
    • Verbal and written communication skills: Assistants are in constant contact with any number of internal and external contacts. If you’re in the role long enough, you’ll develop strong verbal and written communication skills.
    • Specialized skills based on organization/industry: Being an assistant in a specific department or industry exposes you to the day-to-day operations and provides insight into that area’s lingo, processes and technology.
    • Inside company knowledge: You gain knowledge into colleagues’ work styles and the corporate culture, which gives you an advantage at the company if you hope to advance there.

    Alissa Carpenter founded Everything’s Not Ok and That’s OK Coaching after over a decade in higher education. She has advised Millennials and GenZ students at institutions such as The Wharton School and Penn State.

    “As a recent graduate, being a personal assistant can be beneficial to your long term career goals,” says Carpenter. “You have the unique opportunity to work on numerous tasks and learn transferrable skills. You are often on the front line and are able to build relationships and rapport that can provide valuable connections.”

    The three skills organizations believe millennials are lacking can be developed in a personal assistant role, says Carpenter, including:

    • Interpersonal skills: You will be working with people from various levels both in and outside of your organization. You will learn to ask appropriate questions to find the most effective way to complete your tasks at hand and build strategic working relationships.
    • Teamwork: In one of the key positions that is crucial to putting events and tasks together, you will learn how to delegate and how to work with people with varying personalities.
    • Communication skills: As a key point of contact you will quickly learn the most effective ways to communicate with individuals and how people like to receive communications.

    Utilizing a role as an assistant to get where you want to be later in one’s career can really be a asset to entry-level jobs seekers, says Lori Williams, Recruiting Coordinator for College Nannies, Sitters, and Tutors of Edmond, Oklahoma.

    “Not only does it help build credibility and experience on your resume, but the people you often meet in that role can be sourced as references in the future,” says Williams. “You can develop many skills in this role, including project management, event planning, client relations, and administrative duties. All of these skills are transferable into future roles in just about any industry. Being able to develop these skills on the ground floor will help you add a good section to your resume entitled skills or career highlights and you can translate these into the job description for future career goals.”

    Said Ponzar: “Never underestimate an assistant job as a way to get your foot in the door and show what you can do, learn about the company, develop relationships, and new skills.”

    Look for assistant jobs right now on College Recruiter! Want more tips and advice on how to build career and job skills? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Combating bias in the hiring process [video and slides]

    June 14, 2017 by

     

    Last week, College Recruiter co-organized an in-person and live stream event, “Eye Opening Tactics for Better Diversity Recruiting,” alongside WCN and Stinson Leonard Street. Presenters spoke about four topics: why and how diversity matters, combating bias, big data, and non-discrimination employment law. This blog post shares what Ann Jenrette-Thomas,  Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer of Stinson Leonard, presented in part 2: combating bias in the hiring process.

    Scroll down to watch the presentation and download Ann’s slide deck.

    Implicit bias: slow brain vs fast brain

    Implicit bias is the underlying thing that ends up creating problems in the hiring process. Another term for this is unconscious bias. Think of it as shortcuts in your brain. We use mental processes to quickly categorize information so that our brains can function optimally.

    We receive over a million pieces of information per second. This is information we gather from all of our senses. Our brains are detecting so much, but in order to function well, we can’t focus on a million pieces of information. The prefrontal cortex in the front of the brain is the slow brain. And it’s the slow brain that actually is necessary for critical thinking.

    If you repeat a slow-brain activity enough, it gets buried into the reptilian brain, otherwise known as the fast brain or the unconscious brain. Because these processes happen so rapidly, your conscious mind can’t even detect when something unconscious is happening. Take breathing—unless you make an effort to focus on it, you are not thinking about breathing. Another example if how we all learn to drive. When you first started to drive, you focused on putting your hands at ten and two o’clock. As experienced drivers, we’ve all had the experience of getting in the car, somehow arriving home and not even remembering the trip. When you learn to drive, you use your slow brain. When you’ve gotten to the point where it’s automatic, that’s your fast brain.

    This has everything to do with hiring. Some of the things that are embedded in the unconscious part—the fast brain—are cultural norms. Different cultures place value on different styles, of for example, leadership. When Americans think of leadership, we often think of someone who is decisive and confident. Herein lies a challenge for many international employees of multinational corporations that are headquartered in the U.S. In order to advance in the company, many international employees do a stint in the U.S. so that they can have the right qualifications and move up the corporate ladder.

    In Asia, they call that stint the “killing field”. Because in many Asian cultures, a valued leader is someone who is collaborative and who builds consensus, often someone with a much quieter leadership style and different type of confidence. This looks vastly different than an American version of “leadership”. So these particular employees are in a double bind. They have to come here in order to advance their careers. But once they come here, their leadership style prevents them from climbing the corporate ladder.

    There is more to how the unconscious mind affects hiring. We process everything from body language to eye contact, in order to assess whether someone is a good hire.

    Various types of bias in the hiring process

    • Affinity bias means we tend to gravitate toward people who we perceive as similar to ourselves.
    • Confirmation bias is when you magnify things that confirm what you already thinking. Or, you minimize things that contradict what you already think.
    • Attribution bias is when you give a more favorable assessment to somebody that is in your ‘in-group’. Now, what defines an in-group could be a variety of things, and that’s where individuality comes into play.
    • Availability bias describes how we prefer the quick and easy. When we mine for information, we grab what is readily available. Quick: imagine a fire fighter. It’s unlikely you had the image of a woman in your head. The readily available image of a firefighter is a man.
    • Groupthink is very similar to affinity bias. The notion of groupthink is where people are not willing to go against the brain of the homogeneous group.

    Combating bias starts with you

    It’s time to get to get to action and it all starts with you. If you don’t know your own biases or the fact that we are prone to them, then you’re not going to be able to help the system at all. And you have to also educate the people around you in the hiring process. Here are some suggestions for moving forward:

    1. Take the Implicit Association Test. There’s a variety of tests out there: go to projectimplicit.org. It’s free. This just gives you a baseline of where you are on these issues.
    1. Take some time to become socially confident. Learn about any particular cultures with which you are working, for example what leadership looks like.
    1. Assess your hiring process with the assumption that implicit bias is there. Why? Because statistically speaking, it’s there. It could be present where you post your jobs, how the descriptions are actually written, who and how the resumes are reviewed, how the interviews are conducted and who conducts the interviews.
    1. Review your job descriptions for bias. There are certain words and phrases in a job description that could lead to fewer diverse applicants because they will self-select out. For example, women are less likely to apply for a job where there are masculine coded language, like “aggressive” or “adventurous.” Interestingly, men are negligibly affected when it they read feminine coded language, like “collaborative”. When diverse candidates read job descriptions that are more neutral, they are less likely to scrub out any identifying information, for example clubs and organizations that might be specific to an ethnicity. You want to make sure that your job descriptions only include information that is absolutely necessary to perform the job well.
    1. Get used to operating outside your comfort zone. This is ultimately a relationship game. Recruit from a broader circle, go to different places. Ensure that you are also posting on sites that cater to a diverse community. Make sure you understand what other comparable programs are out there beside your core recruiting schools.
    1. Evaluate every resume the exact same way. There are programs out there that can strip demographic information from resume, so that’s one way to try to make things anonymous. It’s also important to develop a standard evaluation form with detailed metrics so that everybody is evaluated on the same criteria.
    1. Identify what you want before the interview begins. If you are clear about the skills, qualities, credentials, etc. that best suit the position, then you can craft questions that speak to those specific skills, credentials, etc. You can develop a checklist of these factors and give them to the interviewers beforehand so that everybody is clear. Prepare the interviewers. Make sure they are aware of the potential for bias. Use a diverse panel of interviewers.

    Finally, don’t get overwhelmed by the challenge of combating bias. Your unconscious biases are going to pop up. It takes effort and time to keep trying to change these things. Be patient, keep at it, and know that you’ll get there.

     

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.

    Download the slides from this presentation here.

    Watch the presentation of this content by Ann Jenrette-Thomas at Stinson Leonard Street from “Eye-Opening Tactics for Better Diversity Recruiting”:

  • Recruiting solutions: How EY is helping prepare students for a future workforce [video]

    June 12, 2017 by

     

    The skills gap has been well researched, particularly surrounding tech skills. Most employers, however, don’t need researchers to tell them that their recruiting strategies still aren’t attracting the skills they need for their future workforce. As the gap threatens to get wider, employers must consider big recruiting solutions. EY decided to face this challenge head on.

    College Recruiter recently spoke with Natasha Stough, Americas Director of Campus Recruiting at EY. EY was facing this very challenge, and they wanted to help prepare entry-level hires right out of college so that they would be able to succeed in a fast-changing industry. Employers with a need to increase the skills of their new hires entering the workforce can learn from EY’s solution.

    Through the Ernst & Young Foundation, EY created an Academic Resource Center (ARC), which now serves as their one-stop shop for college faculty in accounting and related disciplines across the country. With collaboration of university faculty, it provides access to relevant and timely curricula materials on cutting edge topics that are developed specifically for use in university classrooms, helping to prepare students in skills like analytics.

    Scroll down to watch the video of our discussion with Natasha and hear her account of EY’s success in creating the Academic Resource Center. 

    Changes in workforce demands requires a big solution

    EY developed the ARC when the organization was advocating the adoption of a single global set of accounting standards, the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). According to Natasha Stough, EY “immediately started hearing directly from faculty around their concerns that there weren’t a lot of textbooks and information around IFRS to help prepare their students for when they join the workforce.” The Foundation created the EY ARC as a one-stop-shop to offer free curriculua materials in response to faculty’s needs, particularly given the highly regulated public accounting environment in which EY operates, allowing them to “upskill their students and help better prepare them for the fast pace of change in the global marketplace.”

    Colleges and universities may not know what skills are required in practice, until employers help them. Schools want to advance their programs but as the cost of college goes up, they must evolve and stay relevant, or their program will just die off.

    The ARC relies on relationships. EY’s approach is to share timely information about what is happening in practice with EY leaders, who often sit on advisory boards of business schools. It’s important for faculty to approve the curriculum, and in turn, information comes back to EY about the needs of the schools. EY gathers these insights and develops materials on topics where there is the most need.

    “For the good of the profession”–demonstrating the ROI of a faculty resource center

    Building a center like EY’s ARC is a significant investment, especially when you consider the collaboration needed—with faculty and with the experienced professionals—that requires an enormous amount of time and financial support.

    First, Stough says that EY can track who uses the ARC and how much. It is only open to faculty from non-profit, higher education institutions. In addition to being able to the number of users, EY can also measure which materials are used the most, and from which schools across the country.

    In addition, however, EY gets direct feedback that supports the ROI. Stough says, “We hear constantly from faculty about the value the materials bring to them to help enrich the experience they’re providing to their students in the classroom to ensure they are learning the most current and relevant knowledge. We also hear how helpful it is for students to be able to gain insights into the pace of change in the accounting profession.”

    The obvious benefit is that faculty improve their understanding of where employers hold the bar in their field. Ultimately, says Stough, “We want to help them develop future employees. It’s for the good of the profession.” The brand building is not insignificant either. By providing meaningful resources, EY knows they are positioning themselves to faculty as a thought leader.

    Given how technology like AI and robotics changes the workforce and education, “we have to help,” says Stough. The technology skills that students learn in year one of college will change in four years; employers need students who will be life-long learners.

    A good resource center has a variety of materials

    EY provides a lot of different content in the ARC. There are user guides, lecture notes, presentations, data sets, analytic workbooks, webcasts, how-to videos, cases, and homework assignments for students. EY even offers to bring their own professionals into their classroom.

    One key in creating good content is to keep the dialogue open. Faculty should provide feedback about the materials available, and what might be missing, considering leading-edge topics and technology. Stough says, “Our goal is to make it real. We want to give good examples and bring this content to life through these different formats.”

    That’s key too: bringing it to life. Without making the content easy to find and navigate, users will likely disengage. EY decided to even color-code some of its content and provide competency frameworks as well. That way, says Stough, “faculty can use chunks of content, or the entire thing, and understand how the material correlates to competencies they want to focus on.”

    It’s no secret that employers demand soft skills, and public accounting firms are no different, so EY has made sure to include non-accounting skill sets in the ARC. “We consider leading-edge topics to enhance life skills, of soft skills, for the future of the profession. We recently built materials around an Analytics Mindset, that is critical for frankly anyone,” says Stough.

    EY’s Academic Resource Center is an overall recruiting solution

    While an employer can track employee performance, “at the end of the day,”Stough says, you may not be able to draw a direct correlation between one individual’s performance and their association with the resource center. Students take so many classes, and building a resource center must stay focused on engaging faculty to understand the future skills needed. However, Stough does say that she’s seeing a change in the students she meets. Two major areas of EY’s focus have been soft skills and the importance of analyzing and interpreting data. “We’re now seeing more students come in knowing the difference between communicating via email or text.” Additionally, her team is “starting to see a diversification in the skills that students are bringing to the world of where we’re at, like concepts like an analytics mindset and the importance of data.

    Addressing the challenges of a resource center

    Developing a resource center full of relevant materials won’t stay relevant for long. The biggest challenge for EY, says Stough, is remaining current. She says they must ensure that they continue to integrate new content. “We want to make sure we’re meeting the needs of faculty. We are not going to tell them what they need to teach but we will provide resource that we believe to be valuable.”

    To achieve this, Stough stresses the need to maintain strong relationships with faculty, because they provide critical feedback. They want to know how useful their center is, and other topics where “faculty may be looking to gain more information.”

    They also keep doing outreach to build and maintain relationships. They engage with the American Accounting Association and many of their sub groups. As people like Stough travel to college campuses, they make sure to spend time with faculty, deans and department chairs, highlighting the ARC as a resource for them.

    “We want to be at the forefront,” says Stough. “Because it is our job to partner and support the universities to help them drive the curriculum so that their students are ready to join the workforce.”

    Watch our discussion below with EY’s Natasha Stough to hear about how their Academic Resource Center is preparing students for a future workforce:

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.

  • Strategies for recruiting data analytics and related skills

    June 09, 2017 by

     

    Do employers truly understand their own dire need for data analytics, or more broadly, data science and analytics skills? A new report says that by 2020, new job postings that require these skills will hit 2.72 million. There is a concerning gap between the expectations of educators and the expectations of business executives when it comes to getting students ready for the job market. That is according to a study released by the Business-Higher Education Forum and PwC.

    If you are like most employers, in the next several years you will prefer job candidates with data science and analytics skills. And yet, only 23 percent of educators believe their graduates will possess those skills.

    The report makes concrete suggestions for both employers and higher education. Here, we will highlight the recommendations for employers who need to harness skills in data science and analytics.

    What exactly are data science and analytics skills?

    According to the report, “The term analytics refers to the synthesis of knowledge from information. It’s one of the steps in the data life cycle: collection of raw data, preparation of information, analytics, visualization, and access. Data science is the extraction of actionable knowledge directly from data through either a process of discovery, or hypothesis formulation and hypothesis testing.”

    People who need to make data-driven decisions include directors in Human Resources, Marketing, IT, and the C-suite. Data science jobs include systems analysts, data administrators, business intelligence analysts, data engineers and much more.

    This skills gap affects much more than just data scientists. Jobs from the C-suite to the frontlines are increasingly affected by the need for analytics. According to the report, this is a revolution. “As with the revolution in work brought on by the personal computer (PC) 30 years ago, data science and analytics, hand in hand with machine intelligence and automation, are creating a new revolution in work.”

    Businesses who do not attract and retain talent in data science and analytics will eventually be outcompeted.

    What does a business do to attract and retain skills in data science and analytics?

    The report details four recommendations to employers:

    1. Look beyond the diploma and hire for skills, too.

    It’s time to admit that a degree is only a proxy for skill sets. While recruiters can argue the effectiveness of using proxies, it just doesn’t work with DSA skills. The market for these skills is full of disconnected dots. STEM grads are not necessarily prepared to use DSA in business, and business grads are not necessarily taught DSA skills. There is a growing number of DSA degrees, but they haven’t been around long enough for many recruiters to trust their viability, let alone assume they will make the list of annual campus visits.

    Where does this leave us? According to the report, “It is left to hiring managers and recruiters to determine how candidates meet skill requirements in this changing environment. To do that they need two things: 1) a common nomenclature to trade in DSA competencies and skills; and 2) a closer, more collaborative relationship with higher education aimed at creating programs that will provide job candidates with the skills they need.”

    Researchers have identified skills common to data science jobs across broad skill groups. Those are:

    • Applied domain skills (research or business)
    • Data analytics and machine learning
    • Data management and curation
    • Data science engineering
    • Scientific or research methods
    • Personal and interpersonal communication skills

    Employers shouldn’t expect to find all of the above skills in one individual. Rather, they should use these skill groups as a guide to forming teams whose members collectively have a full skill set.

    These skills fall into three categories that employers should assess: data analysis, decision-making and problem-framing: Continue Reading

  • Writing an engineering resume: Tips from Intel for female students and grads [video]

    June 08, 2017 by

     

    How are you supposed to stand apart from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice for preparing an engineering resume, specifically for female students and grads who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 1 of our conversation. Next time we check in, Jeff will share tips for preparing for an engineering interview.

    Scroll down to watch the video of our discussion and hear Jeff’s insight into what he looks for when recruiting engineers.

    Jeff is a member of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is a group of professional around the country that regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers.

    Find what is special about your story

    Before you do anything else, Jeff stresses the importance of the top half of your resume’s first page. That’s the first place you’ll get noticed. You need to include something that will impress the reader, like a statement that makes them want to find out more about your story. Have a good objective to show focus and to show your goals. It’s also good to have a summary of skills, says Jeff. As a student or recent grad, he recommends putting your education right up front so he knows whether you’re looking for an internship or a full-time position.

    The key is to think about what makes you special. Maybe you have some internship experience in the field. For others, it might be that you’ve taken relevant course work. Perhaps you’ve been a project leader several times, or your GPA is outstanding. Whatever your best strength is, says Jeff, should be right up front.

    Don’t compare yourself with candidates with 10 years of experience, because you’re not competing with them. Employers like Intel, says Jeff, know that you are relatively inexperienced, but everyone has strengths. “So I always tell students not to apologize for experience or things they haven’t done yet. Be proud of what you’ve done. You’ve taken coursework. If you’ve taken engineering that’s cutting edge for the level you’re at, be proud of that. Promote what you’re good at. Promote your strengths.”

    Red flags that will put you in the reject pile

    If your resume has typos, that looks really bad. But more commonly, Jeff sees a lack of specifics. For example, a generic and un-compelling objective would be: “looking for challenging opportunity where I can grow my career.” Jeff says that tells him nothing about where you could fit and grow at Intel.

    Further, he often sees resumes with positions or experience listed like a laundry list, with no indication of the quality of that candidate’s work. “It would be like if Michael Phelps said he’s a swimmer.” You need to speak about the quality of work you have done.

    So the key? Be specific, and use numbers when you can.

    What to put on your engineering resume besides work experience

    At this point in an entry level job seeker’s career, everything counts. Jeff says “you can put community or volunteer work. You can put team projects that you’ve done. Certainly the relevant coursework that you’ve done. Awards. Anything that helps you enhance your skills.”

    Specifically for engineering candidates, Jeff likes to see that you’ve given some thought to where you want to go. “So for example, if you’re a computer engineer, are you more interested in hardware or software?” Are you good at coding? Testing? Validation? “Narrow it down, and that tells me what relevant positions and what managers to connect you with.”

    A narrow focus doesn’t imply that you have to know everything before your first day on the job. “Any employer is going to train you in some areas,” says Jeff.

    Overall, your resume should tell a story of what you have achieved and accomplished. However you have succeeded—as a team leader, in your grades, community work, any skills you’ve taught yourself—belongs on your resume.

    How to get past the machines that scan resumes

    For engineering recruiters, the key words that they (or their systems) look for are all technical. Jeff says that at Intel, they don’t program their system to look for resumes with words like “aggressive”, which might end up preferring male candidates. Instead, Jeff says his systems scan for skills like C++ or architecture, or grad degrees.

    Many employers are starting to gain awareness of possible biases that would deter females from even applying. For example, there are software tools that help organizations analyze their job descriptions and make them more likely to appeal to both women and men. Jeff makes more salient point, however:

    “Males are more likely to apply to jobs when they only meet 50+% of the requirements.”

    Women are more likely to apply only when they believe they meet nearly all requirements. Considering that employers like Intel truly want more gender diversity among their engineering teams, there is a lesson here for women. Apply for jobs that list more requirements than you think you meet, and make your case for why you deserve to be hired.

    To get “out of that black hole of a database,” says Jeff, the key is to use the right keywords. To find the right keywords, check the job description and use the language that the employers uses.

    Once a human being pulls your resume from the database, then they’re looking at the whole thing.  “The technical words will get you the attention of my computer. But what I like to see,” says Jeff, is “the whole person. So not just the technical side, but how they are going to fit within the culture.” Employers like Intel will likely appreciate people who can work with minimal supervision, who are self-starters, can take initiative and not just wait for things to be done. Make sure you explain on your resume (and in an interview) how you demonstrate those skills. Think of situations when you’ve stepped to get a job done.

    After you’ve been on the job search for a while, take stock of what’s working. Jeff’s advises, “If you’re sending out resumes and you’re not getting interviews, you want to keep changing the resume until it gives you those results.”

    Finally, remember not to rely entirely on your resume. A big key to finding a job is to always follow up after you apply. For example, search on LinkedIn to find some connections within the company. A real person who can refer you or at least put your resume in front of the hiring manager can make a big difference.

    Search for jobs and internships today! Stay informed of career advice by connecting with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

    Watch our discussion with Intel’s Campus Relations Manager Jeff Dunn, who provides excellent advice for female engineering students and grads, and any entry level job seeker:

  • 7 free marketing strategies that can lead to job search success

    June 06, 2017 by

     

    Are you a recent college grad trying to figure out how to best market your skills and fit your job search into an already busy life? Are you concerned that it’s summer and you’re still trying to find a paid internship? Are you wondering how parents can appropriately – or inappropriately help your job search? Are you a female college grad who aspires to become a leader in your field?

    If so, then read on. Because we have tips and advice for all those questions – and more.

    1. Develop a focused job search

    Many recent college grads simply read job ads and send in resumes, without a plan. Francis says coming up with a job search plan, which includes a list of requirements one would like in a particular job/field, can help created a more focused job search, and target specific jobs or employers. Making a chart that outlines previous experience – part-time jobs, college coursework, clubs or organizations, project work, or previous internships, and jotting down successes from those experiences can help a job seeker realize the successes they have, and then, when they understand those successes, they can start perfecting how they discuss them with employers.

    That also builds confidence.

    Don’t think that part-time college job in retail or the restaurant industry, or other field, matters? Think again.

    “Check back in with previous managers and colleagues to brainstorm all the things you’ve done and skills you’ve developed that may allow you to feel more confident in your abilities,” says Francis.

    Once you have a clearer sense of your own experiences, what you desire in a job, company and what job titles to look for, now you can start your search. If you start before then, you’ll be wasting time.

    2. Ask your career development center for advice

    Meet with a career counselor at your college or university. Even if you have graduated, these professionals are here to assist with job search tips, connecting graduates to a mentor, interview prep, and more.

    “Different schools have resources that are specific to their students and their majors,” says Christine Francis, Career Counselor at Hamline University’s Career Development Center. For example, if you graduated in data science, “the counselor may be able to connect you to alum who studied data science who may be able to help brainstorm next steps and get you connected to companies of interest or great internship programs.”

    Francis offers these tips for recent grads seeking to find an industry specific internship:

    • Post on social media that you’re seeking a paid internship in data science. “The more specific you are in your request, the better your networks will be able to help you,” says Francis. The key is to be as specific as possible, no matter the industry/career one is pursuing.
    • Check job boards to search for internships and job like College Recruiter, recently named #1 job search site for students and recent grads.
    • Use LinkedIn to connect with your school’s LinkedIn alumni group, and see where students or current alums are interning, or currently working. If there is a connection at a target company, reach out to that person and connect.
    • Once connected, start to develop a relationship. Don’t make it all about your needs, and be willing to return any favors to help the new connection. Eventually though, the goal should be to meet with these connections to conduct informational interviews.

    3. Practice, practice, practice, to develop career confidence

    It’s easy for recent college grads to be timid in the job search. That’s only natural. In addition to writing a great resume, practice interviewing, conducting mock interviews (many college career centers also offer these services), informational interviews, or getting involved in networking events and industry associations can help a recent college grad develop confidence in the job search. Many people are timid or fearful because of the newness of being in the job search for the first time. Getting involved and becoming active can help recent college grads develop confidence over time. In addition to working with career development professionals, recent college grads could also consider working with a career coach.

    “Figuring out where your low confidence is coming from is essential in determining how to overcome this,” says Francis.

    4. Start building a professional network

    The first steps to marketing your skill often starts by understanding what employers want. Unfortunately, in some instances or fields, women need to figure out how to get past male-sounding job descriptions. In addition, many female college grads may be timid if they are not finding other females, or leaders, within their chosen field, to learn from. This is where networking, or finding organizations/opportunities to volunteer or participate in industry-related events can help make connections and open doors, while also building career confidence. For example, a new grad seeking a data science career may not know where to find a female data science mentor or leader.

    “There are plenty of women in leadership types of groups or roles for STEM occupations,” says Francis. “These groups are set up to give women support and to feel more confident in their roles.”

    Remember, good old fashioned networking is still very effective.  Inviting professionals in your network for coffee or a quick lunch is good for building relationships and getting others interested in working on your behalf to help you find your next position says

    “You can start small, with just a few people and ask them to consider introducing you to others you may connect with and send your resume or portfolio to,” said Melissa Greenwell, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of national retailer The Finish Line, Inc., and a certified executive coach who helps women understand how they can leverage natural strengths to become business leaders, discussed how female college grads can become future leaders. “You will be surprised at how quickly your professional network will grow,” said Greenwell. “It will also take time. People are busy, so be patient. And don’t let your new networks go stale after you’ve landed the job. You may very well be able to repay a favor and you never know when you may need to reach back out to them in the future.”

    In a previous College Recruiter article, 6 rules for women who want to become corporate leaders, Greenwell said some job seekers, especially those just starting their career, focus on job titles versus opportunity. Don’t sacrifice doing what one loves for the sake of a title. Instead focus on the work itself.

    “People who succeed in whatever they’re doing are people who have aspirations and goals, are willing to work hard and put forth extra effort, communicate clearly, consistently and often, and most importantly, work for the good of the enterprise and bring others along,” says Greenwell, also the author of Money On The Table: How to Increase Profits Through Gender-Balanced Leadership. “Women specifically are driven to work for a purpose and can capitalize on that special drive.”

    5. Ask for helpful parents, not helicopter parents

    Many college grads have parents who are ready to help their child with the job search. That’s great, if done correctly. The main thing to remember is, this is the real world now, and employers expect recent college grads to take initiative, and own their career/job search. Read this article to learn how helicopter parents hinder college grads in detail.

    “Believe it or not, recruiters and hiring managers are seeing a surprising influx of parental involvement in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process,” says Brandi Britton, district president for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. “As a staffing firm, we’ve heard our share of helicopter parent stories and experienced some unique situations with moms and dads ourselves.”

    The reasons for mom and dad getting involved are simple, says Britton: Recent college grads may not have as much job search experience and therefore turn to their parents for guidance.

    “The job search process can be extremely challenging and daunting,” says Britton. “Parental support and advice throughout the process can help you stay positive and on track.”

    But…

    “Although most parents mean well with their efforts, they need to know where to draw the line to avoid hurting their son or daughter’s chances of securing a job,” says Britton.

    6. Find a mentor to develop as a professional

    Anyone can learn from a mentor. However, there are students who can especially benefit by having a mentor help tap them into a network that might normally be just beyond reach. For example, some studies show that entry level women with a mentor show faster career growth than women without mentors. How can one find a mentor?

    “Think about past professors, staff at your school who have supported you, or maybe a new contact – someone you admire in your field,” says Francis. “Set up a meeting to ask for help and tips on how to market yourself.” And when you land that first job, ask if the organization’s has mentorship program.

    7. Try something different: Find a way to stand out in the job search

    Don’t be afraid to try something different in the job search. Employers like creativity, and those who take risks. And while this seems old fashioned, it’s inexpensive, and different. In addition to applying online for a job, mail your resume to the employer too. (Don’t skip the online part–following the directions of every job ad is important.)

    “I’m often asked if sending paper resumes is a thing of the past,” says Greenwell. “In general, it is. However, you never know when one will make it to someone’s desk and cause them to take notice. It’s a relatively low effort and low cost marketing strategy to implement, so my advice is to send them.”

    Once the resume is mailed in, take it even further.

    “The follow up is important, which I would recommend come in the form of a follow-up email,” says Greenwell. “That email shouldn’t necessarily ask for action to be taken, but rather an invitation to reach out to you if they would like to learn more about your qualifications. Personally, I believe phone calls are relatively ineffective, though leaving a voice mail message to thank someone for reading your resume can’t hurt. Again, the goal is to stay visible.”

    Another option to consider? Build your own web site. It’s a built in marketing tool.

    “Building your own website is another interesting marketing strategy,” says Greenwell. “There are many tools available to build your own in a cost-effective and simple manner. This is a good way to display your experiences and interests, and to bring your resume to life. Highlighting educational accomplishments, learning adventures and volunteer experiences is critical. Aside from email, phone and a link to your LinkedIn profile, other personal information should be omitted.

    It’s normal for recent college grads to fear the unexpected, or not know how to approach the job search soon after college. Follow these tips, and over time you will become confident, connected, and in time, hired!

    Want more career advice and job search tips? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube

  • Video interviewing: best practices for employers [video]

    June 05, 2017 by

     

    Recruiters who spend precious time on the time-consuming administrative task of scheduling telephone interviews should seriously be looking at video interview software. College Recruiter recently spoke with Martin Edmondson, CEO of Gradcore, about the trend in asynchronous video interviewing. Gradcore is based in the UK and helps employers understand colleges and their graduates, and they help the graduates understand potential employers. Here, Edmondson provides tips for employers who are considering using video in their interview and hiring process. He has seen this trend on the rise and believes employers can save time and otherwise benefit by implementing video interviews.

    Edmondson is part of College Recruiter’s  Panel of Experts, which is a group of experts around the country who regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers.

    Scroll down to watch the video of our conversation with Edmondson about how to best use video interviewing in your hiring process.

     

    More employers are conducting video interviews to save time.

    More employers are using video interviews, and the opposite trend is true for telephone interviews. Edmondson says he is “seeing a big growth, especially in UK and Europe, around asynchronous video, particularly that second phase of the interview that replaces telephone interviews.”

    In fact, a recent survey by the Association of Graduate Recruiters (the national body in the UK for student and graduate recruitment), showed that in the last year alone usage has gone from 29% to 43% of graduate recruiters using video interviews as a selection tool.

    They are not meant to be the first or final stage of interviewing. A video interview should be used in the middle of the process, especially for employers who have high volume of student or grad recruitment. A video can give a good picture of a candidate at that stage.

    Video interviewing saves time and is a trend

    Source: AGR Annual Survey 2016

    Edmondson adds, “There isa wide range of providers of asynchronous video interviews out there. Many of them carry the same functionality, but with the intense competition in the field there is a constant flow of innovation to improve the technology. The initial battle for market share led to low pricing,  but there is growing differentiation in product and pricing.”

    Pros and cons of an asynchronous video interview

    First, the pros. An asynchronous video brings the advantage of efficiency, much greater flexibility for both the candidate and the recruiter, and it cuts down the overall process time. This improves candidate experience and saves time and money for the recruiter.  In addition, Edmondson adds, “video interviews are really useful for multinational organizations recruiting internationally.”

    “They are best deployed when looking to reduce a large pool of applicants down in a short space of time whilst still using a robust process.” In the middle stage of the process, when  you still have a big pot of candidates to get through, an asynchronous video interview gives you pretty good picture of someone without being too time consuming.

    Recruiters are used to using telephone interviews, where they can lose days just scheduling them. However, with an asynchronous video interview, you “literally just get your question into the system, send it off to 500 or 1,000 graduates, and you give them 48 hours to respond. They come back with their responses that they film themselves. You can then send it out to the recruitment team to review. So it’s very efficient.”

    Edmondson says there is one disadvantage. “They have some drawbacks in comparison to telephone interviews as they don’t allow as much drilling into answers, but the other benefits tend to outweigh this.” That’s why he says it’s meant for  a middle stage, not a final interview. The quality of results from video interviews, adds Edmondson, “as with telephone interviews, is down to the quality and experience of the assessors rather than the medium.”

    How video interviews impact bias in the hiring process

    An asynchronous video can, on one hand, reduce bias because it is structured and remains a standard in the hiring process that is unchanged for every candidate, as opposed to the bias that is introduced by “winging it” with small talk, for example. On the other hand, introducing a video in the middle of the hiring process may introduce new bias because now the recruiter can see the candidate’s face.

    “Bias is in the hands of the person watching the video,” says Edmondson. “If you’ve got well-trained recruiters watching, who are conscious of bias, then you shouldn’t have a problem. If you distribute it to managers who aren’t as well trained in bias, then you may have some more issues.” That is to say, it is the organization’s responsibility to manage and control bias more generally in their interview process, be that through video interviews, face to face interviews or any other form.

    “When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

    To control for bias, the video interview offers another advantage in that they are recorded. “So if you have a concern or if a candidate raised a concern, you can just go back and rewatch it to see if the candidate was reviewed fairly.”

    Considerations while reviewing a video interview

    “When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

    Another consideration is background interruptions, and recruiters may decide to expect some level of interruptions as just par for the course. “The flexibility of the medium allows them to record day and night, but does mean you sometimes get unexpected interruptions from a friend or parent inadvertently appearing in the back of shot.”

    Videos allow interviewers to take into account how the candidate is communicating. However, Edmondson warns of coming advancements in assessing communication. Video interviews may soon be subject to assessing candidates using biometrics, facial expressions, “but for me,” adds Edmondson, “that gets slightly dangerous” and needs more exploration.

    Finally, Edmondson advises that employers considers cultural differences if their organizations operate in multiple countries. There are lot of different suppliers out there, so get a feel for the demos. It’s possible that videos may not be considered totally appropriate in certain areas. If that’s the case, consider not using them at all, or introducing them gradually. If certain candidates can’t access he media for any reason, you have to work around that too.

    Video interviews shouldn’t be used in isolation, and are really at their best in the mid stages of a large scale selection process.

    Watch College Recruiter’s discussion with Martin Edmondson from Gradcore, about how employers can use video interviews:

     

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.