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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 15, 2016 by

Using career services’ budget to connect college students

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Photo by StockUnlimited.com

College career services offices are designed to help prepare college students create career paths. Whether helping college students continue their education or finding internships and entry-level jobs, these offices have the resources and tools students need for succeeding in the job search. The career services professionals on college campuses can even share their personal experiences to give students a better idea of what to expect in the real world.

However, while having resources, tools, and professional advice is nice, how can career services offices improve to attract more college students? Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University, discusses how these offices can center their budgets around collaboration and creativity to connect students with career services offices and other events.

“Collaboration and creativity are the name of the game when it comes to ensuring our budget can be utilized in such a way that we are reaching the greatest number of college students. In a time of shrinking operating budgets, we focus our efforts on developing strong relationships with departments across campus and pool resources to have the greatest impact on students. We have also found a great amount of success in collaborating with student organizations to co-sponsor events. The student group will conduct much of the marketing of an event, as well as fund refreshments, and the career center will organize the content and/or guest speakers.

Another area of potential collaboration is with employers. Many employers are seeking ways to brand their organizations on college campuses, and career centers are seeking ways to connect their students with internship and employment opportunities. One such example was a “Fall Fest” sponsored by an employer. We organized pumpkin decorating, s’mores, hot chocolate, and a fire pit. Turnout at the event was tremendous and offered an opportunity to not only brand the employer, but also market the services of our career center. The event came at no expense to our office.”

For college career services offices looking for more advice, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University

Nichole Lefelhoc, Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University

Nichole Lefelhoc is the Director of the Career Center at Mansfield University. Nichole helps prepare college students for success after graduation and in their chosen careers. She has a responsibility to make sure the career center offers the appropriate services and resources for this to happen. This could mean anything from career exploration, professional image, and resumes/cover letters to internships, job searching, interviewing, and graduate school.

Posted July 11, 2016 by

Networking benefits entry-level candidates

Handshake between a man and a woman photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In their search for entry-level jobs, college students and recent graduates should not assume all employment opportunities are made public. Sometimes, there are opportunities available they can’t find in the newspaper or even online. Students and graduates should talk to people (including their families and friends) about the type of jobs they are looking for. This is part of professional networking. Networking is an opportunity for job seekers to engage in meaningful conversation advancing their careers.

While much of this conversation today happens online, meeting recruiters, hiring managers, or other professionals in person should not be forgotten. Speaking with recruiters, talent acquisition leaders, and hiring managers face-to-face can benefit college students and recent graduates when searching for entry-level jobs. By introducing themselves in person, students and grads can learn more about potential employers, which can help them stand out from the competition. Karen A. Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC, shares advice on networking concerning entry-level candidates.

· “If students want to set themselves apart, I want to meet them in person! I can, probably, already find them online.

· This generation already has a bad reputation for being too “connected.” Get out and see and talk to people.

· The workplace is about face-to-face connections (even in a virtual workspace), so demonstrate you can present yourself in that environment.”

Need more networking advice? Click on our blog, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young is the award-winning Founder and President of HR Resolutions, a full-service human resources management company. She has over 25 years of experience in personnel and human resources, as well as being recognized by the HR Certification Institute as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and the Society for Human Resource Management as an SHRM-SCP. Karen has worked with numerous organizations to improve workplace environments, lower HR costs, and increase the bottom line.

Posted July 10, 2016 by

Networking events on campus give students workplace preview

Hr. photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Recruiters typically head to college campuses every fall. They will be looking for the best and brightest students with the potential to fill internships and entry-level jobs. However, other recruiters will not travel to schools or may limit travel because of the costs; they would prefer job seekers come to them, find candidates online, or may recruit through other means, such as through target email campaigns and banner ads.

Recruiters who opt out of campus recruiting entirely might miss out on the face-to-face interaction with college students interested in learning more about specific employers. Attending at least some of the networking events on college campuses not only allows recruiters to make their presence known but also helps students gain a better understanding of the workplace. John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University, highlights why recruiters and employers should visit college campuses.

“I think it is important for recruiters to actively attend networking events on university and college campuses to assist with developing college students’ understanding of the working world, and begin identifying the marketable skills and abilities essential in that specific area of employment. Employers who attend networking events on university and college campuses have immediate access to college students from various economic and cultural backgrounds while connecting information to students about opportunities for the company or organization they are representing. This information can be helpful for short and long-term career goal setting and connecting students to professionals in the fields of work they are interested in.”

For more advice on professional networking, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University

John Link, Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University

John Link is the Assistant Director for Career Development at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri. An Indiana native, John spent time working at Indiana State University’s Career Center in career programming before making the move to St. Louis. Prior to working in higher education, John worked as an elementary teacher in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and served as an instructional coach to assist teachers in further developing their math and science teaching skills. John enjoys working in career development and helping define students’ career goals through personalized career coaching.

Posted July 09, 2016 by

The art of writing a perfect resume

Laptop, student, boy photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In the realm of job hunting, a resume is the best weapon to help you achieve your goal of landing a great job opportunity. Resumes showcase your skills and virtues in a concise and crisp manner. It helps you sell yourself and impresses your prospective employers. To flaunt your attributes and strengths, and focus on career highlights, your resume is the only document that catches the reader’s attention. To create the best resume, keep certain points in mind, as they will make your resume stand out from others.

Your resume needs a summary statement that briefly summarizes your career and details the kind of work you have done. This summary statement will help recruiters understand your transferable skills and your background. You can resort to infographics as well to make your resume appear more appealing. Infographics give new appeal to your resume and make the information catchy. This helps recruiters see your highlights in a single glance, which improves your chances of being shortlisted as a job candidate.

You must focus on a few other aspects as well to create the best resume. You must take care of the layout, font, and length of the resume. Do not make it too verbose, the font unreadable, and the length of the resume more than two pages. This will help your prospects focus on the job advertisement for the specific role. Keeping your resume concise and free of grammatical errors is a basic check that you must perform. The structure of the resume must mention your personal information and summary statement in a proper layout. So take care of all these points while creating your resume.

The Art of Writing a Great Resume Template

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.template.net/

Find more resume tips on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Lisa Smith, guest writer

Lisa Smith, guest writer

Lisa Smith is a designer by profession, has love for creativity, and enjoys writing articles for almost all topics. Also, she is a regular contributor to Successstory.com, where you can find her favorite topics related to self-improvement and motivation.

Posted July 08, 2016 by

Hiring managers value first impressions and referrals

Friendly woman in business formal outfit photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When attending your next career networking event, remember that hiring managers are watching your every move from the moment you enter the door until the second they begin networking with another job seeker. You can separate yourself from the competition by making the right first impression with recruiters. In addition, you should tell potential employers if you know someone at the particular company or organization. Referrals improve your chances of getting a foot in the door because a current employee can vouch for you, which hiring managers will respect. Internal referrals—referrals made by employees working within the organization—are the best kind of referrals to obtain. Never pass up an opportunity to mention people you know who work for an organization, particularly if you have genuine relationships with those individuals. This isn’t name dropping; it’s networking.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, shares his opinions on networking to find jobs and how networking influences hiring managers.

“Networking is the best way to find a job no matter what industry you are in. Those of us in hiring positions are constantly receiving resumes from recruiters and job applicants, and it’s really impossible for us to sift through the good resumes from the bad ones. When either meeting someone personally who impresses us or getting introduced to someone through a trusted friend, we’re much more willing to look at a resume and contact the applicant, and we also have social pressure to do so.”

Find more networking tips on our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen is the Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, one of the fastest growing software development agencies in the US. Eden is a serial entrepreneur and heads up various other startups including Knife and Fox (design agency), Ctrl Collective (co-working), Glo Bible (app with 3 million+ downloads), Zolo Studios (game studio), and Dev Crew (international software development).

Posted July 07, 2016 by

How to network in the workplace

Two businessmen talking and smiling photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Congratulations on landing your new entry-level job or internship! Perhaps you landed it through networking. If so, that means you understood how to approach interacting with family, friends, and/or recruiting and talent acquisition professionals during your job search.

Now it’s time to transition from networking to find a job to networking in the workplace. This is an opportunity to demonstrate your skills and qualities and learn from established employees who can help you along the way. Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services and LEEP Center Adviser at Clark University, explains how new hires should approach networking in the workplace.

“The first step is to establish yourself as a hard-working, competent, young professional. Making a good first impression in your new role will get your colleagues’ attention and increase the likelihood they will be willing to assist in your career development. At the same time, you need to assimilate into the culture of your organization and begin to create collegial working relationships. If you begin networking too early, it may appear you are too focused on your future rather than your current role.

Once you have established yourself, identify someone one level above you whose position or career path you’re interested in. Start with people you already know. Your goal is to secure an informational interview where you ask questions about the professional’s career trajectory and solicit advice on your potential goals. People generally like to talk about themselves and like to give advice, so you should get a positive response as long as you are polite and professional.

Another goal of that conversation should be expanding your network by asking the professional for names of other professionals they can introduce you to. Etiquette is important in this process so remember that written communication should be formal and professional, and follow-up thank you notes are essential. Above all, be willing to listen and be open to the advice you receive.”

Need more help with networking? Learn more on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon is Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center at Clark University. Cox-Lanyon provides career and academic guidance to students and alumni throughout their career development process. She has been in the field of career services since 1997 and is a member of the National Career Development Association, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, and the Liberal Arts Career Network, through which she participates in annual professional development activities. She holds a BA in Psychology from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and an MS in Psychology from the University of Rhode Island.

Posted July 04, 2016 by

How college students can network professionally

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Photo by StockUnlimited.com

While obtaining a higher education, it’s a smart idea for college students to gather some contacts along the way. Building a professional network in college can be helpful when searching for internships and entry-level jobs. Don’t underestimate classmates, professors, or anyone else who can assist with your job search. John Moriarty, Director of the Career Development Center at Barry University, gives advice on how college students can build a professional network in school.

“The old adage, “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know” is as true today as it was 50 years ago. Building a professional network is the key to unlocking the secrets to success and scores of unknown opportunities. The internet makes it possible to identify professionals in your chosen field; passion, persistence, and determination will enable you to connect with those professionals.

The first and most obvious place for college students to find professionals to connect with while still in school is LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a professional social media platform where professionals create profiles detailing their professional experience, expertise, and education. Using the advanced search feature in LinkedIn, students can search various criteria to find the right person to connect with.

Armed with a list of professionals who are working in college students’ desired fields, it is now time for students to contact the professionals about conducting an informational interview. Ask to meet with professionals (15 to 20 minutes) to learn more about what it takes to succeed in their professions and get advice as job seekers just beginning their careers. Request a face-to-face meeting, but if that is not possible, ask for a phone interview. This is an excellent opportunity for students to build a rapport with professionals and impress them with passion, enthusiasm, and a desire to succeed in the industry.

Besides LinkedIn, college students should take advantage of other internet resources such as industry association websites, news articles, and blogs to identify connections. In addition, students should use the resources of faculty, staff, and the career development center to build their networks.”

Learn more about building a professional network in college on our blog, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

John Moriarty, Director of the Career Development Center at Barry University

John Moriarty, Director of the Career Development Center at Barry University

John Moriarty has an M.B.A. from National University in San Diego, California, and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Florida. A native of South Florida, and a Marine Corps veteran, John spent nine years recruiting employees for various local and national companies before joining the Barry University Career Development Center staff. John has served as a Career Counselor, an Assistant Director, and is currently serving as the Director of the Career Development Center.

Posted July 03, 2016 by

Networking tips for introverted job seekers

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Photo by StockUnlimited.com

While being shy is not a crime, it is something job seekers need to overcome to network. For introverted college students and recent graduates, networking might seem impossible or intimidating when trying to find internships or entry-level jobs. However, that doesn’t mean introverts can’t interact well with people. Knowing what to do ahead of time and practicing it can make introverted job seekers more comfortable when networking. The more confident they are networking, the better their chances of learning about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market. Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant, shares networking tips to help introverts with their job search.

“Tip 1: Smile and have a positive attitude, which is displayed by projecting inviting body language, a.k.a. don’t cross your arms over your chest.

Tip 2: Ask the other person questions first after you introduce yourself to reduce the level of your nervousness. Ask questions like, where do you work and what role do you play in the organization? These are just some easy questions to start the conversation.

Tip 3: Don’t sit with or follow your network at an event. Break away and meet someone new.”

Want to learn more about networking? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant

Peter Margaritis, Chief Edutainment Officer of The Accidental Accountant

Peter A. Margaritis, CPA, is a speaker, educator, trainer, humorist, and self-proclaimed Chief “Edutainment” Officer for The Accidental Accountant™. Partnering with the Business Learning Institute, his firm helps accountants and other business leaders to increase their profitability by strengthening their business success skills and improving morale through better communication. He is a member of the Ohio Society of CPAs, Georgia Society of CPAs, National Speakers Association, and the American Institute of CPAs. Peter is also the author of Improv Is No Joke: Using Improvisation to Create Positive Results in Leadership and Life. www.theaccidentalaccountant.com

Posted July 01, 2016 by

Having lunch with new hires while onboarding

Businesswomen having conversation over lunch photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Making new hires feel comfortable is the responsibility of companies during the onboarding process. One way employers can do this is by reflecting their company values and/or culture to new employees. Companies can use the onboarding process to emphasize qualities they want all employees to represent. Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions, discusses why his company provides lunch on the first day to new hires.

“We welcome new teammates in such a way that it communicates part of our culture is not only being prepared, but we’re welcoming because we really want them here.

One thing we do is provide lunch on the first day. New hires may not be familiar with the area or your cafeteria if you have one. More importantly, it gives us a chance to relax, sit down together, and immerse new teammates into our company culture. At Ramsey Solutions, our Executive Director of Culture, Rick Perry,  joins us and tells stories about the company so new hires get a sense of who we are, what we are, and why we are.”

Interested in welcoming new hires to your company? Visit College Recruiter and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 

Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions

Armando Lopez, Executive Director of Human Resources at Ramsey Solutions

 

Armando Lopez has been an HR professional for 23 years working at Cracker Barrel, American Blue Ribbon Holdings, and now Ramsey Solutions.

Posted June 30, 2016 by

Networking on college campuses builds relationships

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Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Building a relationship with anyone requires time and effort. Once a relationship is established, both parties must work to maintain it. If recruiters and hiring managers want to really connect with college students, they should consider showing up on college campuses. These are networking opportunities not only for students but also for employers. Employers can create connections by personally interacting with college students, answering their questions, or by handing out business cards or other company information. Recruiters and hiring managers who spend time and energy on college campuses can not only network with students but also potentially build long-term relationships with schools. Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific, shares his thoughts on the importance of recruiters attending networking events on college campuses.

“It’s important for organizations with ongoing hiring needs at the college degree level to build and maintain excellent working relationships with their target institutions. Many times, it takes a year or two for given organizations to begin building strong brand reputations at colleges and universities that will attract the top caliber talent they (and other employers) desire.

Creating good recruiting relationships means you want college students talking to and talking up your organization to other students. Nothing is more powerful than trusted friends making a referral based on their own first-hand experience. Approved sponsorship opportunities with key student groups can also help cultivate student recognition of your organization.

Developing a strong partnership with the college’s career services operation is probably the most important thing an organization can do. Doing so can open all kinds of opportunities to engage students and even faculty potentially. In my 20 plus years doing this, I have seen time and again those employers who commit to long-term relationships with schools (i.e., don’t abandon the relationship even when employers are not hiring or there may be a market downturn) will be the most successful.”

Learn more on the importance of networking on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione is the Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific. Tom earned a Ph.D. in Counseling from Ohio University, specializing in college student career development. Tom has 22 years of progressively, responsible experience in career services/placement and university student affairs and works extensively with employers seeking to hire college students or alumni.