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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 26, 2016 by

Biggest networking mistake you can make

Asking photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

For many college students and recent graduates, networking is likely to be part of their job searches. Their success or failure when interacting with recruiters and hiring managers will depend on their approach. While securing internships or entry-level jobs is a priority, college students and recent grads don’t want to come off as too aggressive when asking about career opportunities. Job seekers should not assume that just because they are eager to work that employers will automatically tell them about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market.

When networking, students and graduates can inform professionals about who they are and what interests they have. At the same time, they can ask questions to learn more about potential employers and what they have to offer. Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, discusses a key mistake to avoid when networking and shares helpful tips for a better experience.

“The biggest networking mistake is asking people if they know of any open jobs. It’s good to be aggressive and show you’re looking for work. But why should anyone recommend you, especially if they don’t know you or your work ethic?

The best way to network is showing curiosity about what people do. Ask them and tell them you’d like to learn more about their profession; establish an interest in them. They may recommend you and say “This person is interested in…and may be good for the position.” Asking employers if they’re hiring won’t be as effective as “Hey, what do you do?” Avoid that mistake and you’ll be better at networking.”

Want to improve your networking skills? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

Marc Prosser is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, a site that provides reviews and articles for small business owners. Prior to starting Fit Small Business, Marc was the CMO of FXCM for 10 years. He joined as FXCM’s first employee and grew the company to more than 700 employees.

Posted August 08, 2016 by

Is a college degree worth it for Millennials?

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In today’s global, competitive workforce—where Millennials are the largest generation to date—jobs are tough to find and competition is more than 10 times worse than before the last economic downturn in 2008. For the past eight years, evidence shows a stalling, declining economy with pockets of hope but mostly despair. A recent poll cited that college graduates and Millennials under the age of 35 are moving back in with their parents in the homes they grew up in at alarmingly increasing rates. Other recent findings include the following factors that can hinder a graduate’s job search: taking too long to graduate while others fill jobs; going on to graduate school and delaying a career start; not being able to afford to work for less in a career start due to heavy college loan debt.

What is a newly minted college graduate to do? Is the college degree they hold in their hands worth it? Will they find a job? Will they make enough to pay off student loans and college debt while at the same time living independently from their parents?

 

Welcome to the “new normal” of what is the big Millennial challenge: Finding jobs that pay well enough to satisfy debt while at the same time affording a lifestyle.

In this brave, new world of global capitalism, government spending, and oversight, new regulations such as the new overtime mandate of paying salaried workers more for overtime…. graduates are in for a big wake up call! And more, older, qualified and more senior workers are standing in line for those jobs.

Happy yet? Keep reading. The US economy is stalled. Unfortunately, the government has decided to make it their role to tell employers how to run their businesses. Small businesses—the county’s backbone of entrepreneurship—have become stressed and many have closed or re-shifted to allow for these regulations. Some economists are predicting layoffs over the next few quarters as a result of a stalled economy coupled with higher mandated wages. Additionally, technology is often replacing workers in the workforce adding to the “do less with more” theme in many business operations.

Here are the top things you must do if you want employment in this US economy, and this includes being able to pay off debt:

Get more than one job: It may take a career start for less money combined with a job waiting tables on nights and weekends to make enough money. There is no shame in this, and in fact, future recruiters and employers will react positively to those Millennials who demonstrate a good work ethic.

Don’t expect it to be handed to you: Gone are the days of jobs awaiting. Employers want employees with “go get ‘em” work ethics. As an employer of Millennials, I am always looking for young talent willing to earn their way into my business.

We don’t care about your yoga, essential oils or feelings at work: They call it work for a reason. While some larger companies (Google, Twitter, etc) have offered amenities and benefits attractive to Millennials, these jobs are often reserved for the top few. A recent news report cited high competition for these coveted jobs. Most businesses cannot afford to “cater” to a certain type of demographic like the Millennials.

Communicate the old fashioned way: Look people in the eye, shake hands, talk persuasively, and send a hand-written thank you note. In a recent report by DC-based, NRF (National Retail Federation), communication skills place last on a list of training wants for Millennials. Placing first on the employer’s list? Communication skills. Millennials who understand what corporate recruiters are seeking will be those better able to get employed.

Secure a job that you know you can achieve in and take it: Work hard to prove yourself. My friend, Patti Clauss, Sr. VP of Global Talent for Williams-Sonoma and related companies says to “follow my lead and communicate with me like I communicate with you. Stay put in your job long enough to learn something valuable and transferable,” says Clauss.

Stay in your first job long enough, and work hard to generate results that are good enough to brag about: You must achieve results, get good feedback and move the ball down the field. Only then will people notice you and want to promote you or hire you away.

Don’t be a quitter: The problem with Millennials is they don’t stay put long enough to learn enough to make them valuable to the next employer: Hopping around in jobs is not a career enhancing practice. Employers will take note of a graduate who has moved around more than once within a two to three year time frame. Nobody wants to invest in someone if they know they won’t stay long enough to add value.

Reach out and engage with older, more established mentors in your job or career who can give you advice you won’t get anywhere else. Listen to those who have forged their paths before you and learn.

Read the local paper and read blogs by those in your area of work.

Know that your college degree is only as good as the paper it is on: While we believe a degree is a door opener, it is just that. What you do with it is what matters. A degree (or many) will not convince an employer to select you over others. We see many smart, degreed people out there looking for any job—often an entry level job.

Amy Howell, Author and Founder of Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC

Amy Howell, Author and Founder of Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC

Times are so different and it is critical that Millennials get into high gear and work to get ahead. They must understand that getting a degree is just one quiver in their pack of arrows. Today, they must have many other weapons with which to compete.

Amy D. Howell is founder and owner of Memphis PR firm, Howell Marketing Strategies, LLC, a mother of a college student, high school student and author of two books, “Women in High Gear,” and most recently “Students in High Gear.”

Posted February 12, 2016 by

Interview questions recruiters can ask job candidates

Every company has its own interview process designed to learn more about job candidates. How college students and recent graduates answer questions from an interviewer can make or break their chances of landing entry-level jobs. Recruiters and hiring managers can ask candidates a variety of interview questions during the hiring process. Dennis Theodorou, Executive Search Expert and Vice President of Operations at JMJ Phillip Executive Search, discusses his company’s interview process and offers questions recruiters may ask candidates in general.

Job applicant answering interview questions courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

“December and May are peak hiring times for the majority of employers, and that allows us to hire directly out of several of the top-ranked colleges. In a strong hiring year, well over 100 recent graduates are interviewed, and we’ll hire as many as 10. Some of the top qualities we’re searching for when hiring for any one of our workforce and recruiting companies are listed below.

We consider our first interview a fairly easy process; the first round interview focuses more on general knowledge, passions, goals in life, etc., and that allows the job candidate to be less anxious and communicate freely. The second interview, which some have dubbed “the beat down session,” is where we dive into behavioral economics and reasons why people do the things they do. What we’re seeking from college graduates at this point in the interview process is whether or not they will fit into our culture naturally.

Employers want to know if the job candidate can operate autonomously. As a college graduate, can you honestly work well within a team when needed? Are you motivated? Are you a hustler in your work ethics? Are you naturally curious and willing to learn something new every day? How well do you deal with adversity? Do you have the ability to develop customer service skills in order to deal with client? These are questions employers should ask to really understand who they’re hiring. For some of our positions, we look for signs and ask if they possess the business acumen and creativity to develop and contribute to profitable ideas. We may be hiring a college student, but one who has the skills and qualities of a professional ready to take on the workforce!”

Interested in learning more about interview questions, go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Mr. Dennis Theodorou has more than 15 years of operational excellence and executive experience across multiple industries including: executive search, supply chain, manufacturing, retail and hospitality. Mr. Theodorou graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Supply Chain Management from the leading supply chain management college in the world: Michigan State University. He has continued his education through graduate-level course work at Harvard University. As a development agent for Subway, he managed and led an entire region of store locations including the management of self-owned stores, franchise development, real estate and area management. As a national expert in hiring, he has hired more than 700 employees over his entire career span and works hand-in-hand with companies to help on board top talent. Currently as Vice President of JMJ Phillip, he manages a portfolio of executive recruiting and employment service brands, spanning multiple locations and across nearly all verticals.

Posted February 03, 2016 by

Overcoming employers’ preference for candidates with work experience

Many employers prefer job candidates to have work experience when they apply for jobs. While gaining work experience gives college students and recent graduates a leg up on their competition, there are ways to overcome not having it. Bill Driscoll, District President of Accountemps, discusses the work experience dilemma and offers advice to college students and recent graduates searching for entry-level jobs. (more…)

Posted August 20, 2015 by

6 Tips to Create a Positive Online Presence ASAP

online presence words on a computer keyboard key or button to illustrate good website visibility on the Internet through good SEO or search engine optimization

Online Presence words on a computer keyboard key or button to illustrate good website visibility on the Internet through good SEO or search engine optimization. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The start of school is now upon us and it’s important for college juniors and seniors to represent themselves in the best light possible and gain some positive networking experiences well before they go off into the world of internships and careers. It’s essential for upperclassman to make sure they have built their online presence, especially on LinkedIn, long before graduation day. Students who don’t have a professional profile are less likely to get hired in a timely manner and more likely to have trouble paying back those hefty student loans. There are a few great ways students can update their online profile in just a few minutes. (more…)

Posted May 05, 2015 by

Entry Level Job Seekers, Do You Meet the Expectations of Employers?

Whether you are a recent college graduate or other first time job seeker, there are certain skills and qualities that employers want you to have to get hired for entry level jobs.  Ask yourself what you bring to the table that can add value to a particular company.  Why should you do that?  It seems that in today’s job market, employers are having a difficult time finding what they want in candidates. (more…)

Posted April 17, 2015 by

Advantages of Greek Life in Your Post-Grad Career

Pi Kappa Alpha Greek House, Florida International University, Miami FL

Pi Kappa Alpha Greek House, Florida International University, Miami FL. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

More than nine million college students wear Greek letters as members of Greek chapters today. Whether they join to build their resumes or make friends, Greek life can change the students’ lives after graduation for the better. Greek life has become a key point of success for students after they leave campus. Studies show that Greek students have a 10% higher success rate than the non-Greek students. So why exactly do students involved in Greek life feel more prepared to enter the real world upon graduation? (more…)

Posted March 27, 2015 by

Why Graduates Lose Out on Jobs and How to Avoid It

Amy Klimek photoYou’ve taken dozens of classes and have finally graduated. Congratulations to those college graduates ready to take on the world. Although you have all the textbook intelligence, you may be lacking in everyday lay knowledge. Landing yourself a job isn’t as easy as writing out all your achievements on a resume. There are preparations before an interview and considerations to pay attention to during the meeting. If you aren’t careful, you could lose out on a lucrative position you were perfect for otherwise. Take a look at some of the reasons why interviews don’t go well and how to avoid them. (more…)

Posted March 13, 2015 by

8 Reasons Why Graduate School Is Worth the Effort

Someone wearing red sneakers heading towards his master's degree

Someone wearing red sneakers heading towards his master’s degree. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most students cease their college careers after obtaining bachelor’s degrees. However, there is also the possibility of continuing your education into grad school. The rewards can be numerous and long lasting. Below are 8 reasons why you may want to consider acquiring an advanced degree. (more…)

Posted March 13, 2015 by

Turning Volunteer Experience into Work Experience

Portrait of kitchen staff in homeless shelter

Portrait of kitchen staff in homeless shelter. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Many young people finish college successfully only to find that their resume doesn’t have everything they need to land a job in their field. Although the job market is increasingly competitive, new graduates are advised to remember that their volunteer experience is a great thing to include when building their resume. Although traditional paid jobs are the most straightforward way to demonstrate experience to potential employers, people who volunteer on a regular basis should remember that unpaid work is a valid and helpful thing to exhibit as part of their experience history. (more…)