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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 05, 2016 by

4 interview preparation tips

Did you know that employers site lack of preparation as the most common interview mistake made by candidates?

Don’t allow yourself to make this common and costly mistake. Check out this five-minute video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, for four quick tips to help you prepare for upcoming interviews.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Before recruiters even select which candidates to interview, they conduct what are referred to as initial screening sessions. These are often conducted over the phone or online. Many recruiters weed out 50% of candidates during the initial screening process. This means you need to prepare not only for your actual interview; you need to also prepare for the screening process! Once you begin applying for jobs, be prepared and expect to receive emails and phone calls which may require you to respond quickly and in a thoughtful, meaningful manner.

1. Be prepared with interview skills.

This sounds like common sense, but many candidates overlook the need to brush up on interview basics: common interview questions, your own selling points, reflecting on your work history and educational background, and thinking about how you’ll respond if asked why you want the particular job (this question will most likely be asked).

If you feel inadequately prepared for your interview and are lacking basic interview skills, don’t panic. Search our blog for articles on the topic you’re curious about and be sure to visit your local career services office for advice, assistance, and to sign up for upcoming mock interviews or interview workshops.

2. Be prepared with questions for the employer about the position and company. Research; do your homework!

This step is vital. If you’re going to skip one of these four steps in the preparation process, do not skip this step. With access to company websites, you really have no excuse to arrive ill-informed about the company you’re interviewing with and to know nothing about the position you’re interviewing for. Nothing irritates a recruiter more than to interview someone who asks the exact same questions the candidate can easily find answers to on the frequently asked questions (FAQ) page of the company website. Don’t be that guy.

3. Be prepared with interview gear.

Print out your resume, reference page, and cover letter on quality resume paper. Bring at least two copies in case you’re interviewed by multiple recruiters/hiring managers. You should carry your documents in a leather-bound binder or neat-looking folder if possible, along with a pen and notepad with your prepared questions. It’s completely acceptable to take a few notes during the interview about main points made by the employer; avoid scribbling or writing so many notes that you avoid eye contact, though.

Be sure to prepare your interview outfit at least one day in advance as well. Dry clean your outfit or wash/iron your clothing to ensure you look your best. Shine/polish your shoes if necessary.

Make transportation arrangements if you do not own your own vehicle.

4. Prepare yourself.

Remember the tips your elementary teacher provided you with during standardized testing? Recall those tips when preparing for job interviews. Get plenty of rest. Don’t stay up all night partying or playing video games the night before interviews. Eat well, but don’t stuff yourself. Drink a little coffee if you like, but not too much. Drink plenty of water. Try to avoid exposure to cigarette smoke or any strong scents or odors before arriving on site for your interview.

Just remember when preparing for interviews that you’re investing precious minutes in your own future; you’re never wasting time.

For more tips to help you land a fabulous entry-level job, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

 

Posted January 20, 2014 by

Hot College Majors in 2014

Using a pencil to choose a major on questionnaire

Using a pencil to choose a major on questionnaire. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most of us were told as children that we could be whatever we wanted to be when we grew up. As time goes on, most of us tend to realize that the truth is slightly more complicated.

We’re all free to follow our dreams and passions, but our trajectory in life, particularly where college is concerned, can have a great deal more to do with pragmatism than with the far-off dreams of our childhood. Quite simply, our choice of college major should take a number of factors into account, including the state of the job market. (more…)

Posted October 22, 2013 by

Bring the Best Out of Your Workers with Entry Level Jobs. 3 Management Tips Employers Can Learn from the Gaming World

Employers, how can you get the most out of your young professionals with entry level jobs?  Consider three management tips to apply from the gaming world in the following post.

Is your company experiencing poor engagement, performance and retention among your Millennial workforce? You could turn things around if you embrace training that uses the dopamine reward system. Yes, I’m serious. If you’re responsible for training Millennials, you need to get smart about dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter released as a response to everyday events like completing tasks, eating

See the article here –

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Posted February 25, 2013 by

How to become a game designer

You’ve been called a “gamer” for as long as you can remember, so you might as well make a career out of it, right? Well, it might all sound like fun and games, but game design has evolved from the days of scribbling a great idea on the back of a napkin into an elaborate process involving a  specialists trained in a variety of disciplines who collaborate and sometimes work long hours to create great computer or video games replete with state-of-the-art animation and visual effects. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 59 percent of multimedia artists and animators, which includes computer and video game designers, are self-employed, often working from home but also in offices. (more…)

Posted December 22, 2008 by

How Would You Like to Write for a Video Game?

If you’re a gamer, how many times have you sat down and read the bio of one of the characters you wanted to use? Did you ever wonder who wrote the back stories for characters like Sonic the Hedgehog, Lara Croft, or Super Mario Brothers? Did you ever think you’d like to be one of the people who wrote the story lines for video games like Resident Evil or the Final Fantasy series? Well, guess what … if you’re a writing major, that idea isn’t as far out as you might think.
Interactive-media writer, Carol Handler Miller, tells writers and aspiring writers how to expand their professional horizons in a really cool way. In her article for the December 2008 issue of The Writer magazine, Miller explains the job and advises on how to break into the industry.

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