ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted June 05, 2015 by

How to use the secret language of job postings to supercharge your resume, cover letter and interview

 

Job postings have a secret language all their own and understanding this can supercharge both resume and cover letter, plus your performance at job interviews.

There are half a dozen keywords and phrases that you see in almost every job posting. These words and phrases are so commonly used that most people say they are meaningless – that you could put any job title on top of them. These people are missing the point. Far from being pointless, these words represent a secret language that most job hunters never grasp but should include in their job application. Those that elaborate on these keywords and phrases are the ones who get the job offers and the subsequently promotions that help them achieve far greater levels of long-term success.  (more…)

Posted October 20, 2014 by

3 Steps to Marketing Your Working Abroad Experience on Your Resume

Work abroad sign

Work abroad sign. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Attention TEFL teachers: remember the excitement you felt a year or two ago, when you were preparing to jet off to a foreign country for exotic adventures and easy money?

If you’re the driven type, that excitement has probably been replaced by nagging worries and questions like: Will my TEFL experience help me get a job back home? Should I include my teaching experience on my resume? When I was a teacher in Taiwan these questions always popped up at expat get-togethers.

As time goes by, many expats begin to feel themselves sinking into to the quicksand that can become teaching abroad. They know that they don’t want to teach forever, but they fear that their time their time spent teaching will be seen as a negative to employers back home. (more…)

Posted September 08, 2014 by

Does Your Resume Have the Skills that Recruiters Want?

If you want to impress recruiters with your resume, make sure it shows the skills that will attract them.  Learn more in the following post.

Sitting down to write a resume is an intimidating experience. You need to decide on a format, a branding statement, how to list your work experience, and of course, how to highlight your skills. It is the latter, highlighting your skills the right way, that seems to give job seekers the most trouble. In

Link –

Continue Reading

Posted September 08, 2014 by

Looking for an Entry Level Job in a New Career? How You Can Sell Yourself to a Potential Employer

Are you tired of your current entry level job and want to start a new career?  If so, find out how to sell yourself to a potential employer in the following post.

You graduated college, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. You envisioned the position you were going to pursue. You began working in an entry-level position and were promoted a few times — either earning that desired position or feeling as though you were on track for it. Five years deep into a career

Read the article:

Continue Reading

Posted June 09, 2014 by

Straight out of college? Here’s how to turn your degree into a job

Smiling female college graduate with her classmates

Smiling female college graduate with her classmates. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

There you are, the day of your graduation ceremony, celebrating as though tomorrow isn’t the first day of unemployment. And, before you know it, you’re out of college, wide-eyed, shaking and cradling your degree like it’s the child you never wanted.

But leaving those vast halls of learning needn’t be like a scene from Apocalypse Now. Instead of falling into an unemployed rut, have a look at your degree and consider its practical applications to really make the most of it.

Here are a few of the more popular degree qualification areas and what you can do with them. (more…)

Posted May 27, 2014 by

Tips If You are Searching for an Entry Level Job with a Liberal Arts Degree

If you need some help searching for an entry level job with a liberal arts degree, check out the following post for some tips that can make a difference.

Like me, you might have realized once you got to college, choosing a major was scary. Like me, you might have felt panicked, because it can seem like a major determines not only what you’ll be studying, but also what your career track will be, and what direction your adult life will take (and that’s hardly a

Visit site:

Continue Reading

Posted March 21, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Use Transferable Skills to Show You’re the Right Candidate for a Position

If you want to be an internship finder who works in a specific career field, but don’t have experience in that field, the following post has advice on using transferable skills to prove you’re the right candidate for a position.

Featured: Not Featured I met a great student at a WISE networking event at UCLA end of February. She emailed me and told me that her dream internship is in the sports industry. She explained that she had some great work and internship experience on her resume but didn’t have any work within the sports industry. She

Visit source:

Continue Reading

Posted March 06, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Here are 10 Things to Keep in Mind During Your Experience

The following post shares 10 things an internship finder should keep in mind during his or her experience as an intern.

I read a few posts recently, with poignant advice, the gist of which covered “Top 10 Things I Wish I Knew In College.” (If I was the author, however, I’d include a good hangover cure! Just sayin’…) The subject got me thinking about questions I get from interns, and some of

View original post here:

Continue Reading

Posted February 20, 2014 by

How to Find Your Value When Searching for Recent Graduate Jobs

If you believe you do not have enough experience for a particular job, think about what you have to offer a potential employer.  The following post shows you how find your value when searching for recent graduate jobs.

Do you doubt the value you may bring to a potential employer? If so, I want to show you a wonderful technique to get past the “I don’t have a lot of work experience” barrier; a tool that will enable you to focus on where you do have experience that translates into something

Follow this link:

Continue Reading