ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 13, 2016 by

Balancing academics and work as a college student

Photo of Anthony Taylor

Anthony Taylor, guest writer

Students go off to college, but it’s not the rosy life they see in the movies. There are bills to pay, tuition to afford, books to buy, and honestly, balancing finances at a young age is hard. Studying in college and concentrating on getting good grades is tough enough without throwing in a job into the mix. But the money has to flow in to either support the family or to support getting an education. Whatever the reason, here are a few tips to help college students juggle their working and studying lives.

1. Find a job with flexible hours: Let’s face it; students are in college now. There will be coursework and assignments with tight deadlines, and studying should always be a priority. An education will serve as the building blocks for the future so students shouldn’t push it in the backburner. They should find jobs where they can easily accommodate their studies, too, so neither one suffers. These jobs could be within the college campus, as those kinds of jobs understand the balance between work and study, and they can help college students manage their homework.

2. Manage time wisely: With so much on the line, it is wise to have a good time management schedule. College students should know where they spend their time. Many successful people plan nearly each moment of their day to get the most out of their 24 hours. Many times we end up wasting time and not realizing it when we could be putting it to good use. Use lunch breaks to catch up on math homework, or grab a few hours of work during a long lunch break in college. Those few hours can add up during the week. Students need to keep checking in to see if they’re on track per their schedules to know they’re not overcommitting themselves or falling short of their goals. If students know they function better in the mornings, they should get evening jobs so they can do coursework or assignments when they’re fresh and vice versa.

3. Have family support: This goes without saying; without a support system, college students will find it very hard to adjust both lives alone. Students should inform their managers at work, friends, or family to support them in this decision, and help them both personally and professionally. This kind of support will help students infinitely when they feel the pressure is too much, or they need help with managing homework.

4. Know what they want: College students should choose jobs wisely if they can. Students should think about how what they do now could benefit them in the future. Remember, everything can be added to their portfolios. If working in a store, think of inventory – managing time and stock. All of this could and should be interpreted as work experience, and this could boost entry into the working world by gaining experience, references, professional growth, and of course, the money.

5. Be creative in getting homework done: By having a job, college students are effectively cutting down on their study hours. Students must be smart about juggling their time, and try listening to lectures while working. They should also keep their managers in the loop so they get that support system. This way, students can learn, revise, and perhaps even do homework during work hours, which don’t require much brain activity like sorting mail, etc.

6. Take a mental break: It is important to have some time out from studies. Always having studies/ homework on the mind will stress students out, especially if they know they can’t do it during work hours. Allow a study free zone while at work. Know there is nothing students can do about it, so they should give themselves permission to relax. Many times we block ourselves, and take on more stress over things we cannot control. Those moments students are not thinking about studies could benefit them in the long run. This way, they can approach their assignments with a fresh mind.

Smiling college students holding hands at graduation courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

7. Stay focused on the end goal: The end goal should be graduating. Many times, once students start working, they find it hard to stay focused on education. It becomes easy to forget about studies and think about short term benefits, such as getting paid. This spending power lets many people forget about graduating. College students must find ways to motivate themselves. Keep pictures of graduates at their ceremonies or photos of people who managed to reach the pinnacle of their careers to have an aim and a goal to reach.

8. Research on future courses: Students should find courses relevant to them and their future interests. Don’t choose a random course because friends are taking it, or because somebody else has a strong opinion about it. Students need to discover what they are passionate about and what they see themselves doing in the future. Doing some research on courses will help them achieve their future goals.

9. Be smart financially: Money can flow through college students’ fingers like water if they’re not careful. Keep track on spending and where the money has to be allocated. If there are bills to pay, keep that money aside, or pay off debts before doing anything else. This helps students become more financially independent. This not involves their weekly paycheck, but also their tuition. Most colleges have hefty fees so be sure to enroll in a program where there are future benefits. Don’t get a job and go into debt due to careless spending, as this will cause a downward spiral.

10. Be passionate: Happiness can only come from within. College students should be passionate about the courses they will be taking; passion will get them through tough times. If students truly do something they love, they will excel in it. Be happy at the workplace. Find a job that is mentally stimulating or has a good work team. This makes a huge difference in students’ mental health and happiness, and when they’re young and balancing their work and study lives, this is very important.

The balance for managing studies and work can be a fine line, and one that should be carefully monitored so college students don’t end up suffering by their decision to work. This has become a recent trend, as many young students have bills to pay, and this enables them to gain work experience while also getting homework help and inspiration from their coworkers or family.

Need more tips for college students, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Anthony Taylor is a writer, student and editor on student’s writing website. He loves reading, writing motivational stories and spending the time with his family. You can follow him on Twitter and Google+ for more interesting stories.

Posted April 09, 2015 by

Saving on Schooling: Slick Tips to Stick to a Budget in College

Chalkboard with "Budget" written on it.

Chalkboard with “Budget” written on it. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Who has the time and energy to work, earn money, and study while attending college? Here are some slick tips to help you stick to a budget in college and give you a leg up when it comes to figuring out first time finances.

Write a Budget
You listed expenses and income, set priorities in case funds run short, and allocated an amount to each item, right? If not, do this today. Use free, online budget software and worksheets you can download, or make your own.
Account for expenses students often overlook:
Tithing and charitable contributions.
Auto maintenance and repair.
Savings – List as an expense each pay period. Use only for planned purchases like books or travel home.
Gifts, cards – Don’t be robbed of the joy of giving.
Emergency savings – Covers out-of-pocket expenses like ER co-pays, major car repairs, or a lawyer should you need help fighting traffic tickets, for example, but not that college students are ever in a hurry, of course.
Fun money – a set amount to spend as you please. (more…)

Posted May 12, 2014 by

Just Had a Vacation from Those Recent Graduate Jobs? Don’t Post Photos that Might Harm Your Career

While you might be tempted to show off your vacation photos, be careful not the rub anyone the wrong way on those recent graduate jobs.  Learn more in the following post.

You’ve been endlessly plugging away at work for months; spending late nights at the office and wishing that someone would invent a coffee IV already. Impressing your boss at every turn can be exhausting, so you start desperately counting down the days to when you can finally get some R & R and your skin can

Continue at source:

Continue Reading

Posted September 12, 2013 by

College Freshmen, Avoid These 15 Financial Errors

College student holding money and books, upset by tuition cost and debt

College student holding money and books, upset by tuition cost and debt. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you are a college freshman who wants to make the most of your financial situation, be sure to avoid the 15 mistakes mentioned by Kiplinger in the following post.

·         Spending without a budget—students might not have much experience tracking their spending, but their checking account balance could quickly hit $0 if they don’t take the time to find out where their money is going on a day-to-day basis.

·         Paying for a checking account—it’s become harder to find free checking accounts with no strings attached, but many banks offer free student accounts with no minimum balance. (more…)

Posted August 09, 2013 by

Embezzling Employees are a Problem in the Workplace

Employers may be shocked to know that their employees are stealing from them.  How so?  Learn more in the following post.

Coupa Software, a leading provider of cloud-based spend optimization solutions for finance, recently announced the findings of it 2013 Employee Spending Survey, fielded among 500 American office workers, aged 18 and older, conducted online by uSamp in June.

The survey found that employees believe so-called “maverick spending” is costing their companies a lot of money.  58% have estimated that it is as much as $25,000 a year in waste, fraud and abuse, with many who say it is much more, including 9% who believe it is in excess of $100,000 and 6% who say it is more than $200,000 per year. (more…)