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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 22, 2013 by

47% of College Grads Start Work In Field Different From Their Major

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Choosing your college major is a significant life decision, but a new study from CareerBuilder suggests it may not necessarily define your career path. Nearly half (47 percent) of college-educated workers said their first job after college was not related to their college major. Thirty-two percent of college-educated workers reported that they never found a job related to their college major. Among more seasoned workers – those ages 35 and older – that number is 31 percent.

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from August 13 to September 6, 2013, and included a representative sample of 2,134 workers across industries and company sizes who graduated from college.

“A college education will give you a significant advantage in the job market. In a tough economic climate, college graduates must be flexible and open to taking positions outside their area of study. Taking the knowledge gained in college and branching out with it in unexpected directions is common after graduating,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “In most cases, workers who went into a new field ended up liking the new industry. Odds are you won’t get that dream job right out of school, but it’s important to remember that there are many different paths.” (more…)

Posted August 16, 2013 by

10 Ways To Stand Out In Your Job Interview

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

I often speak with job seekers who tell me that they’ve applied to dozens or even hundreds of jobs yet are still either unemployed or stuck in a job they hate. Overwhelmingly they believe the problem is with their resume yet one question that I’ll ask often reveals the problem — if there is one — has more to do with their interviewing skills and less to do with their resumes. The question that I ask is whether they’re getting interviews and how often. If they’re getting an interview for every five or so jobs to which they’re applying, that’s a reasonable ratio so their problem likely has nothing to do with their resume or the jobs to which they’re applying. If they’re getting an interview for every 100 jobs, then there’s a good chance there’s a problem with their resume, the jobs to which they’re applying, or both. But what if they’re getting lots of interviews but those interviews are not leading to job offers? Then the problem likely relates to their interviewing skills.

Some job seekers believe that they must stand out to potential employers during the interview stage and, to an extent, I agree. If an employer interviews 10 people for one opening and can’t remember anything about you, the likelihood of you getting the offer is pretty slim. But just because they remember you doesn’t mean that they will want to extend a job offer to you. The key isn’t just standing out. It is standing out for the right reasons. You don’t want them to remember you as a fool or a jerk, for instance. You want them to remember you as someone who struck them as being very likely to succeed in their workplace. (more…)

Posted May 31, 2013 by

8 Worst Professions for Gaining Weight

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

A new study has found that more than half (55 percent) of workers consider themselves to be overweight, and 41 percent have gained weight at their present jobs. Of those who say they’ve gained weight, 59 percent gained over 10 pounds and 30 percent gained over 20 pounds. Conversely, 16 percent of all workers say they’ve lost weight while at their current job.

The national survey, which was conducted online for Careerbuilder by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013, included more than 3,600 full-time workers.

Professions that often involve high stress levels or long hours behind a desk had a higher percentage of workers putting on extra pounds. Among those most likely to report weight gain: (more…)

Posted April 26, 2013 by

Men Earn Average of $68,300 Versus $44,400 For Women Because Highest-Paying Jobs Dominated by Men

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

For years there’s been a lot of controversy about why men tend to make far more money than women. I’ve seen a number of studies showing that the average woman makes about 75 percent of what the average man makes. Some believe that the problem — if it even is a problem — is due to women tending to choose occupational fields which pay less than the occupational fields which tend to be chosen by men. One counter argument to that is that many occupations require similar educational backgrounds, supply and demand for the labor, skill requirements, riskiness, and other such attributes and yet the occupations dominated by women are still paid less. An example I’ve often heard to illustrate this point is that skilled production line workers tend to make more than school teachers.

Whether one agrees that similar jobs should pay similarly or whether the market will somehow sort out who should be paid more, the data is clear that men tend to earn far more than women. A new study from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) underscores the continued wage gap in the U.S. On average, men earn $68,300 annually compared to $44,400 for women, and there continues to be a lower percentage of women in the nation’s highest-paying occupations. The study also shows that while women continue to lag men in leadership roles, trends are pointing in a positive direction with women being more equally represented or surpassing men in various high-skill, specialized positions. (more…)

Posted April 11, 2013 by

15 Weirdest Requests Employees Have Received From Their Bosses

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

What is the strangest thing your boss has asked you to do? Spy on senior management? Work on her daughter’s science project? How about loan him money? Nearly one-in-four workers (23 percent) reported that their bosses have asked them to perform tasks that are not related to their jobs, according to a new CareerBuilder study.

The national survey, which was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013, included more than 3,600 U.S. workers across industries and company sizes. Additional results draw from a similar study conducted in November 2012 among more than 3,500 workers.

Grading the Boss

Most workers like reporting to their current boss. When asked to grade their boss’s performance, the majority (66 percent) gave an above average rating: (more…)

Posted January 24, 2013 by

70% of Workers Say Increased Pay Key to Their Retention

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

If you could have one perk – any perk – in your workplace, what would it be? If you had the choice, would you rather have a bigger title or a bigger office? If you were thinking about leaving your company, what would make you stay? A new survey explores which job factors are most important to today’s workers. More than 3,900 full-time workers nationwide participated in the survey conducted online by Harris Interactive from November 1 to November 30, 2012.

Nearly one-third of employers (32 percent) reported that top performers left their organizations in 2012 and 39 percent are concerned that they’ll lose top talent in 2013. While most workers (66 percent) stated that they are generally satisfied with their jobs, one in four (25 percent) said they will change jobs in 2013 or 2014. (more…)

Posted January 10, 2013 by

6 Worst Interview Mistakes Job Seekers Make

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

One-in-four workers (25 percent) reported they plan to change jobs in 2013 or 2014. While outrageous actions by candidates in job interviews can result in lost opportunities, so can other behaviors that are seen more frequently. When asked to identify the top detrimental mistakes in job interviews, hiring managers reported: (more…)

Posted November 29, 2012 by

80% of Employers Call References and 16% of Those Call Before Job Interviews

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

A new study cautions job seekers about the references they cite when applying to companies. Three-in-five employers (62 percent) said that when they contacted a reference listed on an application, the reference didn’t have good things to say about the candidate. Twenty-nine percent of employers reported that they have caught a fake reference on a candidate’s application.

The study was conducted by for Careerbuilder by Harris Interactive© from August 13 to September 6, 2012 and included 2,494 hiring managers and human resource professionals and 3,976 workers across industries and company sizes.

“You want to make sure you are including your biggest cheerleaders among your job references,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “Before choosing someone, ask yourself ‘Did this person understand my full scope of responsibilities? Can he or she vouch for my skills, accomplishments and work ethic?’ You also want to make sure that you ask your former colleagues if you can list them as a reference. If someone is unwilling, it helps you to avoid a potentially awkward or damaging interaction with an employer of interest.” (more…)

Posted November 02, 2012 by

How to Discuss Politics at Work

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Politics are on everyone’s mind, but workers may feel more comfortable keeping it out of the office. Sixty-six percent of workers don’t share their political affiliation at work, and 28 percent of workers said they feel like they need to keep their affiliation secret around the office.

The national survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive© on behalf of CareerBuilder among more than 4,100 U.S. workers ages 18 and over between August 13 and September 6, 2012.

The study also found that men are more likely than women to share their political beliefs at work, with 37 percent of men sharing their affiliation compared to 31 percent of women. (more…)

Posted September 28, 2012 by

10 Recommendations for Job Seekers With Criminal Records

Prisoner behind chain link fence

Prisoner behind chain link fence courtesy of Shutterstock

While having a run-in with the law can have long-term repercussions for job hunting, a new study from CareerBuilder shows organizations are open to giving people second chances. Fifty-one percent of human resource managers reported that their organizations have hired someone with a criminal record.

The study, which was conducted by Harris Interactive© and included more than 2,000 hiring managers nationwide, also looked at what job seekers with criminal records can do to help their chances of getting hired.

“The number one recommendation hiring managers have is to own your past and focus on what you learned from it to grow professionally and personally,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “You also want to stay active. Taking classes, volunteering and tapping into social networks can be good ways to help overcome obstacles associated with job hunting with a criminal past.” (more…)