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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 18, 2016 by

3 tips for getting the most out of part-time jobs

Retail, portrait, clipboard photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As a college student, it can often feel like your part time job is purely for bringing in the cash you need to splash on your expenses and social activities. This, however, is not necessarily the case. The experience gained from working a part time job can be invaluable towards assisting with your selection of a future career, as well as contributing to landing your first full-time entry-level job later down the track.

1. On-the-job experience

As far as choosing a career goes, you may have already decided. Obviously you’ve enrolled in a college degree, and now it’s just a matter of time before you land your dream job and get started, right? Well, actually, using your choice of part time work to gain particular experience that will assist with your career selection is a good start. Sometimes when you gain on-the-job work experience in a particular field, you may actually change your mind about thinking it’s the perfect career for you.

Part time jobs can be tricky to land, but if you are presented with choice, why not select one that’s closest to the type of job you’ll work once you’ve completed your degree? For example, work as a veterinary assistant while studying to become a vet. Use this opportunity to test the waters and see if you feel comfortable working in a similar environment in which you’ll soon be qualified.

2. Future benefits

As well as using your part time job as an opportunity to test if you enjoy a particular type of work, you can also leverage it to land yourself your first ‘real’ job sooner. The work experience you gain during college will be included on the resume you submit for prospective full-time jobs once qualified. An empty resume won’t impress a prospective employer, nor will having one that fails to contain any outstanding information.

Separate yourself from future competition by using time worked in your part-time job to earn credit for future job applications. Accomplishments such as taking on higher duties, greater responsibility, winning awards, and being promoted will all look fantastic on your resume. Ask your manager if you can take on new work so you have the opportunity to learn different job skills and gain broader exposure to the work environment. You could also assist with designing a strategy to save the business money or increasing the level of customer satisfaction, for example.

3. Expand your network

Holding down a part-time job will also help you to expand your professional network. You’ll create connections and relationships with people that may be able to assist you with finding work at a later date. Your manager may be willing to provide a reference for you, or your colleague may recommend you to their employer at such time as they gain full-time work.

Working hard now will pay off in the future, as you present a resume and work experience that demonstrates your commitment to work and your enthusiasm to achieve beyond minimum expectations.

Searching for a part-time job? Visit College Recruiter and follow our blog. Also, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Joe Flanagan, Senior Resume Consultant at Velvet Jobs

Joe Flanagan, Senior Outplacement Consultant at Velvet Jobs

Joe Flanagan is the Senior Outplacement Consultant at Velvet Jobs, offering outplacement services and a search facility for job seekers of all ages and industries. His expertise include resume writing, job search tips and hiring issues. When he’s not trying to improve the unemployment rate you can find him traveling the world and learning new languages.
Posted February 09, 2016 by

3 online networking tips

As a college student, you might be an expert at using social networking apps like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and Whisper for connecting with friends and communicating about day-to-day life, but do you admittedly need guidance when it comes to networking online for professional reasons? It’s one thing to post pictures of your weekend adventures with your best friends—it’s another to reach out to your social network for assistance when conducting your first full-time job or internship search.

This brief video featuring Career and Disability Services Coordinator, Rebecca Warren, of the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville, highlights three simple tips for making the most of social media when networking online for professional purposes.


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1)      Clean up your social media pages, profiles, and online presence before becoming active in your job search.

Networking online via social media for professional purposes is a different animal than using social media for personal reasons.  Make sure everything you post (or have visible and set to “public”) is appropriate; would you feel comfortable with the content being seen by an employer or by someone listed as a job reference? If not, delete it. Delete statuses and posts including curse words and long rants, Tweets with awful grammar, and photos portraying you in a negative or scandalous light. The rule of thumb is to always yourself positively and professionally, particularly when conducting a job search. Don’t begin the online networking process until you’ve taken this first step.

2)      Let your existing network know you are preparing to begin a job search.

Let your contacts—friends, family, and other contacts you are already connected to online– know about your career field (which is probably related to your college major), where your interests lie, where you have completed internships, etc.  Be careful when reaching out; when networking online, you never want to demand assistance or seem pushy, arrogant, or nonchalant. When asking for assistance in your job search, attempt to come across as gracious and patient. Remember, your social media contacts are under no obligation to assist you—expressing gratitude for any act of support or assistance is always a good idea!

Your social network will grow based on the people your existing connections know.

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

“If your existing network online doesn’t know you’re conducting a job search, they can’t help you,” says Rebecca Warren.

If you build the support of your initial contacts, you already have many people cheering you on before you even begin.

3)      Connect online via social media with professional groups in your field.

Many professional organizations host pages or groups on social media platforms, including LinkedIn and Facebook, and some even host weekly online Twitter discussions. Connecting with professional organizations and getting involved in discussions requires effort on your part, but this work pays off. You never know when a member of a group might know about an unlisted job opening or an upcoming job opening within his organization. If you are regularly participating in online discussions and making intelligent contributions to discussions, the member may reach out to you about the job opening.

Networking online is similar to networking face-to-face; it’s an ongoing process, and it’s about relationships. Whether you’re using social media apps or participating in professional groups and discussion boards, simply treat people professionally and with common courtesies, and you’ll find your online network growing exponentially.

To begin practicing these three great tips for using social media to your advantage in your job search, visit College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

 

Posted June 18, 2015 by

Hunting for Your First Job in IT? Here Is How to Land It!

Young engineer business man with thin modern aluminium laptop in network server room

Young engineer business man with thin modern aluminium laptop in network server room. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Although there are tons of open job positions for IT specialists all over the world, that doesn’t mean it’s easy to get your first job in this sector. There are many professionals with better skills, greater experience, and more recommendations that will attract an employer’s attention. How do you get the right people to notice you?

It is hard to get a job of this type with no previous working experience, but you cannot gain the needed experience if no one is willing to give you a job. That’s a paradox we’ll never solve. Don’t despair; there is always hope for everyone with the right set of skills needed for success in this industry. After all, you can attract attention with your own projects, right? Read on; the following tips will teach you how to get that first job in the IT sector. (more…)

Posted June 17, 2015 by

An essential thing almost everyone forgets when applying for a job

Midsection of a businessman shaking hands with a female interviewer in office

Midsection of a businessman shaking hands with a female interviewer in office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most of the applicants forget it because they think this is only for creatives. The portfolio. “Oh come on”, you’re ready to say, “I’m not a designer. A portfolio for an accountant – are you kidding me?” Truth to be told, there can be a portfolio for almost any kind of job. Only in some cases, you don’t send it to the potential employer and don’t put it on a table during the interview. But if you’ll definitely benefit from having it for yourself; here is why and how.

In fact, once your resume is considered and you are invited for an interview, your potential employer will most likely ask you the questions that every good creative asks him/herself when making a portfolio. Why not get prepared and sketch out your portfolio? (more…)

Posted June 20, 2014 by

Did You Find an Internship or Summer Job? Your Performance Can Affect a Future Job Search

Congratulations on your search to find an internship or summer job!  Now that you have found a position, you must prove yourself to your boss.  The following post explains that your performance could impact another job search in the future.

We are in the midst of summer. A lot of students are working. Many are in jobs that are not internships in their potential future field. Plain and simple, millions are working to sock away some money. So let’s say you have ‘a job.’ You don’t love it. Maybe you don’t even like it. It

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Posted May 21, 2014 by

Searching for Recent Graduate Jobs? How Mere Exposure Can Benefit Your Ability to Network

When it comes to networking for recent graduate jobs, mere exposure could make the difference in your job search.  Learn about this concept and some do’s and don’ts of it in the following post.

As young professionals, we’re taught to network like our careers depend on it. Your professional network can open just about any door. All we have to do to capture that holy grail of networking is put ourselves out there, and then we’re golden. We’re told to just “start networking,” but in reality it’s

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Posted April 28, 2014 by

Reputation Management Starts in College

Reputation management on a chalkboard

Reputation management on a chalkboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Reputation management might not be something that you start thinking about when you are still in college. However, it is never too early to start thinking about building your reputation up. Maintaining a reputation as a hard working college student will carry over into your career since many of the same students you go to school with might be people you work with in the future, and they even might influence whether or not you get a job. Your professors in college can have a direct influence on your future hiring possibilities. Therefore, employing reputation management tips and maintaining a professional persona throughout college can help you secure your dream job once you graduate. (more…)

Posted April 11, 2014 by

Writing Cover Letters for Recent Graduate Jobs? 5 Tips to Put Forth Your Best Work

If you need some cover letter tips when applying for recent graduate jobs, the following post has five that will help you produce your best work.

Ask two people for career advice, and one set of advice will likely be far different from the other. Cover letters (are they a critical element of your job search, or are they just discarded?) are no exception. Despite all the differing opinions, people in both camps agree on one point: If a prospective employer

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Posted March 06, 2014 by

Need References for Recent College Graduate Jobs? Make Sure You Choose Carefully

If the time comes when you need references in search of recent college graduate jobs, be careful about who you choose.  The following post has some advice on how to select the right people as references.

You’ve completed your interview… and can finally breathe a sigh of relief. It is now time for the interview panel to go to work. They will review their notes from the interview, your work experience, and any testing you’ve completed. References will be checked. It may seem like this part of your interview process is

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Posted August 30, 2013 by

Entry Level Job Seekers, Do You Want to Stand Out to a Hiring Manager? 6 Ways You Can Distinguish Yourself as a Candidate

As an entry level job seeker, you have probably heard about standing out from the competition.  This is important because employers are looking for the best candidates available in the job market.  If you want to distinguish yourself from everyone else, the following post has six ways that can help.

One of the worst things that can happen after an interview is to be forgotten. Things happen. Sometimes a great candidate can be lost in the endless stack of resumes. Malcolm Gladwell coined the phrase “the stickiness factor” in his book The Tipping Point.  With these six tips, you can become sticky in the mind of

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