ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 19, 2016 by

6 part-time jobs for college students in 2016

Looking for part-time job message courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Constantin Stanciu/Shutterstock.com

Are you a college student who needs a little bit of extra money? Sometimes, students can find a work-study position or other type of on-campus job, but those are sometimes few and far between, especially at colleges with large student bodies. If students haven’t found jobs on campus they like, it’s time to look elsewhere. Fortunately, there are a number of great part-time jobs out there college students are ideally suited for. Here are six highly remunerative part-time jobs college students may be interested in.

1. Non-profit charity fundraiser

Charities are always looking for young people to help them out, especially in the fundraising department. This type of job often entails manning donation tables at various events, which means college students are going to be talking to a lot of people. They’ll need to be able to memorize facts about the charity and who it helps, be personable, and be able to smile and chat for hours. It’s not a job for introverts, but for those who are outgoing and want to gain experience working for nonprofits, it’s a great option. It also pays well—students can make up to $30/hour!

2. Social media assistant

Everyone is on some form of social media these days, but not everyone has mastered it. Some small business owners don’t even have time to really develop their social media because they’re so busy handling everything else, and they don’t have the money to hire someone full-time. However, many can budget money for a part-time social media assistant. If college students love Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms and don’t mind putting in the time to learn how to truly harness these sites for a business, then this is a great job for them. It can pay as much as $21/hour.

3. Academic tutor

If college students are peculiarly sharp in one particular subject area, they might want to offer their services as academic tutors to other students. Sometimes, these jobs are available through the university, but there’s nothing stopping them from doing private tutoring. Students will need to be sure they thoroughly understand the subject, and know how to explain it to others. They will be able to set their own rate and schedule, which is nice, but there’s no guarantee being a tutor will be steady work. Tutors make anything from $15 to $30 a tutoring session, but the rate and the length of each session has to be negotiated.

4. Freelance content writer

Many websites, blogs, and online publications are in need of content, and while some do have writers on staff, many look to freelance writers for new content. College students can find a number of these jobs online, and many don’t require much experience in writing, as long as they can show them a few well-written sample articles. Their pay will be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Sometimes, students will be paid per word, while other clients may want to set a flat rate per article. On the upside, they’ll be able to work when they want and can do so from home.

Receptionist wearing a headset and glasses smiling courtesy of Shutterstock.com

CJM Grafx/Shutterstock.com

5. Office assistant

It may not sound glamorous, but being an office assistant is a good, steady job for college students. Students get to see first-hand how an office environment works, and the skills they develop can be useful in their own careers. Here are some of the tasks they may do as an office assistant:

• Answer the phones

• Do filing and organization

• Do light computer work

• Schedule appointments

• Assist employees with various tasks as needed

Students’ duties may vary depending on where they work, but those listed are fairly common. Through the job, they may learn about various computer problems, organizational methods, and more. During off-job hours, students can easily stay connected with their customers via cloud phone systems. If they get office assistant jobs at a business in their fields, they may even be able to turn their part-time gigs into full-time jobs when they graduate.

6. Guest services coordinator

A guest services coordinator assists customers with all of their needs. They may do returns, help customers find products, or do special orders in a retail setting. However, guest services can be found in many different industries. Some may actually do more office work, while others may work in support roles. No matter what industry students are working in, however, they’ll be dealing with customers, so this is another job in which being a people person is a must. It’s possible to make as much as $21 in one of these positions.

Want to learn more about different jobs, visit College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Sandra Lambert

Sandra Lambert, guest writer

Sandra Lambert is a CISCO certified computer networking specialist. She has a keen interest in writing about her knowledge and experiences. She writes about technology as well as about business. She has also developed interest in public speaking. You can follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

Posted October 22, 2015 by

Everything you need to create a winning LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn is no longer optional. It’s an indispensable component of the modern job search. Unfortunately, the effective use of LinkedIn is not intuitive. In this webinar, you will learn everything you need to know to create a winning LinkedIn Profile to gain attention from employers. The webinar is conducted as a step by step demonstration to illustrate site functionality and empower you to utilize the enhancements you need to create your own LinkedIn Profile.

The webinar Everything you need to know to create a winning LinkedIn Profile features social media consultant Chaim Shapiro (https://www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro), moderated by College Recruiter’s former National Account Manager Andrea McEwen-Henderson (https://www.linkedin.com/in/andreamcewen).

Key takeaways:

  1. Create a LinkedIn Profile featuring a consistent and winning brand.
  2. Learn how to promote yourself via LinkedIn.
  3. Discover what to include and what not to include in your Profile.
  4. Master the tips and tricks to really make your Profile stand out.

 

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly

click here

    .

  1. What are some of your best tips for students and others who are creating LinkedIn Profiles?
  • Promote your brand visually by selecting key photos.
  • Carefully select industry, headline keywords, etc., featured at the top of your LinkedIn Profile and in searches.
  • Provide links to your other social media pages or profiles so your contacts on LinkedIn can connect with you elsewhere.
  • Take advantage of the opportunity to showcase academic or professional publications. Future employers and recruiters and your peers may find your publications interesting and impressive.
  • When selecting which skills to feature on your Profile, be picky, and list them in order of importance. Use the “above the fold” rule. The higher up it is on your Profile, the more likely it is to be noticed by recruiters, employers, and contacts.
  • Only feature contact on your Profile that presents you in the best possible light.
  1. When should students start reaching out to people on LinkedIn?
  • Students should create a solid LinkedIn Profile before networking on LinkedIn (before adding contacts).
  1. What is the deal with endorsements?
  • Endorsements were originally a great idea on LinkedIn, but they are often misused. Many people endorse everyone and do not use discretion. It’s best not to endorse people unless you truly have knowledge of their skill base, however, so that your endorsement really means something, and you can stand behind it.
  1. How do I choose which skills to feature on my Profile?
  • Identify people who are leaders in your field (using various search options on LinkedIn). After determining which skills those leaders feature on their own LinkedIn Profiles, mimic their selections.

Bio: Chaim Shapiro, President of Zorach Consulting, is a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn workshop at National Conferences, universities, public libraries and for communal organizations across the country.

Chaim is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College in New York. He earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University Of California Riverside Graduate School Of Education. Chaim has more than 15 years of experience working in organizational administration.

 

Posted June 24, 2015 by

Make Your CV Work for You

CV icon isolated on white background

CV icon isolated on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you have applied for a position and have been asked to submit a CV, you might be asking, “What is a curriculum vitae?” In the past, you only submitted resumes, so you are in for a new experience, and one that may take quite a bit of time and reflection. Hopefully, what follows will give you some good insight into CV writing and some of the things that you can do to make yours stand out. (more…)

Posted April 16, 2015 by

Own the Room at Your Next Networking Event as a Student, Intern and Recent Graduate

Networking Event words on a wall calendar to remind you of the day or date for a business meeting, celebration, conference or seminar

Networking Event words on a wall calendar to remind you of the day or date for a business meeting, celebration, conference or seminar. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

We live in a busy world, and college students are no exception. Today’s young adults have hectic schedules and are often times running between classes, work, extracurricular activities and social time with friends. It may seem tough to fit one more thing into this schedule, however, it is important to make time for networking as well. Networking will help you to gain experience now and will be beneficial in the long run for your career. As a student, intern or recent graduate, it can be intimidating to stand in a room full of unfamiliar faces that have more professional experience than you do. Here are a few quick tips to help you own the room and stand out like a pro at your next networking event. (more…)

Posted December 16, 2014 by

College Students: Can You Use a Resume Template?

Mark Slack

Mark Slack

Getting ready to find your first internship or job? You probably have a lot of questions about how and where to begin.

Allow me to answer the following question, which will save you time and effort for the rest of your career: can you use a downloaded resume template?

The answer is yes, you absolutely can. Here are some myths about resume templates that need to be dispelled so that you don’t waste your time formatting a resume, or buying one for an outrageous price. (more…)

Posted July 18, 2014 by

How to Craft a Killer Post-Grad Resume

Erica Wolfe

Erica Wolfe, Marketing Associate at Greek Streak

Graduating from college is an incredible achievement filled with excitement, but it also comes with questions and uncertainties about the future. Beginning the job application process can be overwhelming, as college grads are competing with thousands of others for entry-level positions. With the right resume, landing that first job might come easier than expected. Here are a few tips on how to craft the perfect post-grad resume so that you can stand out from the competition. (more…)

Posted March 14, 2014 by

How to Find a Job That Not Everyone’s Applying To

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement Sales Recruiting

Often, it’s not your resume that’s hurting you.  It’s not that your LinkedIn profile is preventing you from job search success.  It’s not where you went to college, either.

Rather, it’s the number of other applicants going for the same openings.  For instance, if you’re applying to the same positions as a 1,000 other qualified applicants, you have a 0.1% chance of getting that job.

As an intelligent job seeker, you should automatically recognize that when you utilize the mainstream avenues such as LinkedIn and Monster, you’re often competing with the masses.

As a result, you have less options, more rejection and lowered confidence from non-responsive hiring managers. (more…)

Posted February 06, 2014 by

Getting Over a Job Search Slump

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement Sales Recruiting

If you think of your job search like a sport, then it is natural to expect peaks and valleys in your own performance.  Still, there is nothing more draining, humbling and dispiriting than consistent rejection and non-responsiveness during a job search.

I’ve learned that when interviewing, challenges or problems will always arise and there are two ways to deal with them: the effective way and the ineffective way.  The effective way is to assess where you are, determine where you want to be in your career, identify and implement creative solutions, and remain resilient. (more…)

Posted February 03, 2014 by

Take Your Internship and Turn It into an Entry Level Job

If you have enjoyed your internship and want to boost your chances of turning it into an entry level job, the following post includes an infographic with some helpful tips.

Internships are now essentially mandatory to get a real-world job. Employers want to hire candidates that come with skills already in hand, ready to go from day one. And many employers hire their current interns. Recently NACE reported that 69% of employers with 100 or more employees offered full-time

Link to article:

Continue Reading